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The Best Google Voice Command Hacks

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The Best Google Voice Command Hacks

Sometimes it’s nice to pretend that we’re from the future or that we’re Tony Stark (Iron Man). We have Siri and numerous other apps and utilities that we can use voice commands on, but did you know Google is one of them? Here Digital Information World and Trendblog share the best Google voice command hacks:

Today, the average web surfer can search for a number of differently phrased words or keywords related to a specific topic and still come up with a plethora of great information from a myriad of sources. However, the world wide web wasn’t always so easy to navigate; there was once a time when one had to know the exact wording of a website’s title to find what they were looking for they. A search for “social media” didn’t prompt the search engines to provide the user with related topics and keywords, and adding a URL to an engine’s index sometimes took months to complete. But, many thanks to evolving technology and the search engines’ star Google who made this process much better and easier, where you even don’t bother to type your quires, now with the help of Aladdin’s Magic Lamp you just need to command the genie with your voice and he will bring instant results that will be quite accurate according to your desire. So here are 60+ voice commands for Googlers to use the search engine giant more efficiently, go ahead, say the magic words or tap the hell out of that microphone button and try them out yourself!

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    General Voice Commands

    “Say [where is the ATM kiosk] in [Australia]?”
    “Who invented [the pajama]?”
    “What is the meaning of [Irfan]?”
    “Stock price of [Twitter]”
    “Post to Google+ [I’ll not post anything today, except cool selfies]”

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    Notes and Reminders Commands

    “Set alarm for [11 PM]”
    “Remind me to [pay bill] at [8 AM]”

    Time and Date Voice Commands

    “What time is it in [Karachi]?”
    “When is the sunset [in New York City]”
    ”What is the time zone of [Brazil]”

    Communication commands

    “Call [Bill]”
    “Send [email] to Anna, [Subject: Transaction], [Message: Thanks, I’ve got the money]”
    “Send [SMS] to Mike mobile, [Don’t forget to buy cookies]”

    Weather commands

    Say “[Weather]”
    “Is it going to rain [Saturday]”
    “What’s the weather in [Florida]?”

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    Maps & Navigation

    “Show me the nearby [Bar] on map”
    “Navigate to [Changai] on car”
    “How far is [Chao Phraya River] from [Wat Arun]?”

    Conversions and Calculations Commands

    “What is the tip for [200] dollars?”
    “Convert [currency / weight / length …] to [currency / weight / length …]”
    “How much is [28] times [96]?”
    “What is [15] percent of [9680]?”

    Sports Commands

    “How are [Grays Athletic] doing?”
    “When is the next [Los Angeles Lakers] game?”
    “Did [Bayern Munich] win their last game?”

    Flight Information

    “Flight [Jet Airways]?”
    “When will [AA 125] land / depart?”

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    Web Browsing Commands

    “Go to [Mashable]?”
    “Open [Social Media Examiner]”
    “Show me [TechCrunch]”

    Entertainment Commands

    “Listen to / play [I’m with you] by [Avril Lavigne]?”
    “YouTube [The most amazing videos]?”
    “Who acted in [The avengers]?”
    “When was [Iron Man 3] released?”

    Easter Eggs

    “Okay Jarvis, …” (Instead of “Okay Google, …”)

    “What’s the loneliest number?”

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    Infographic by trendblog.

    How To Search Google With Voice Commands | Digital Information World

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    Siobhan Harmer

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    Last Updated on November 25, 2021

    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

    There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

    Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

      What Does Private Browsing Do?

      When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

      For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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      The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

      The Terminal Archive

      While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

      Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

      dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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      Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

      Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

      However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

      Clearing Your Tracks

      Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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      dscacheutil -flushcache

      As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

      Other Browsers and Private Browsing

      Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

      If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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      As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

      Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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