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The 12 Days of Giveaways: Day 2 – Toodledo for iOS

The 12 Days of Giveaways: Day 2 – Toodledo for iOS

Today is the second day of The 12 Days of Giveaways at Lifehack.org where we are giving our readers some of the best productivity swag around. Mostly because we like you, but also because we love the products that we are giving away. And today is no different with one of the most ubiquitous and best to-do list apps around: Toodledo for iOS.

But first, yesterday’s Knock Knock “Hack Your Way to a Fresh 2012” winner is…

Lifehack commenter amyrosebrown with this excellent comment,

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“A guy once hit on me at a bar using the High Five Nifty Notes, so I personally like those.”

Nice. And maybe now she can return the favor in 2012. Congrats amyrosebrown!

    Toodledo for iPhone

    Anywho, Toodledo has been around for a while now and has proven to be one of the best web apps for keeping track of your tasks and projects with its insane amount of features and ways to use it. If you haven’t seen Toodledo or used it yet and you are reading Lifehack, then you may be reading from under a rock, as we have featured it on many top GTD and productivity app lists.

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    Another thing to mention, especially for those out there that haven’t tried Toodledo since the middle of this year (2011), is that Toodledo has had a complete design overhaul. Now, not only is Toodledo a functional and awesome to use application, it is even better to look at on the web.

    For today’s giveaway, Toodledo has given us 10  promo codes to provide 10 lucky Lifehack.org readers with Toodledo for iOS. The app is Universal and will work on both iPad and iPhone/iPod touch.

    I’ve personally used Toodledo on-and-off for almost 3 years now and I still think that it is one of the best apps for getting things done. Here are just some of Toodledo’s features:

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    • Use tags, folders, contexts, status, priority, due date, start date, etc. to organize and prioritize your tasks.
    • You can use Toodledo pretty much anywhere be it web, iPhone, iPad, mobile web, and even some 3rd party apps for Mac and Windows support Toodledo sync. You can check out their 3rd-party list here.
    • Toodledo also offers collaboration with shared projects
    • Import and export functions. This is important for those “data liberation type of zealot types” (like me).
    • Ability to have subtasks (pro-account only)
    • Excellent iOS app that gives you all the filtering and list “shucking-and-jiving” you could ever want. And hey, you have a chance to win this one!

    But really, the best way to check out what Toodledo has to offer is to check them out for yourself.

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      How to Enter

      In order to enter to win this Toodledo for iOS, leave a comment below or on our Facebook fan page telling us the following:

      “How will you use Toodledo for iOS in the coming year to be more productive?”

      Leaving a comment on both our Facebook fan page and here at Lifehack.org will get you 2 entries. Try not to copy and paste though, the better the comment, the better your chances of winning a Toodle for iOS promo code!

      The Fine Print

      Employees of Toodledo and of Stepcase (including current independent contractors of both) are not eligible for this contest. These promo codes can only be used on iOS (so keep that in mind when entering). The winning 10 entries will be judged by the Stepcase Lifehack editing team and winners will be notified on the platform in which their winning entry was placed (either on the Lifehack.org Facebook wall or by email through our commenting system here at Lifehack.org). Please note that by submitting an entry, Toodledo and/or Stepcase may use your comments for promotional purposes, although neither entity will use your name without permission. Entries must be submitted by 10 am Eastern the following day and winners will be chosen by 12 pm Eastern time on the same day. The winner will be announced on Monday at Lifehack.org, and will be notified beforehand.

      Good luck!

      More by this author

      CM Smith

      A technologist and writer who shares advice on personal productivity, creativity and how to use technology to get things done.

      5 Project Management Tools to Get Your Team on Track To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System How to Beat Procrastination: 29 Simple Tweaks to Make Design Is Important: How To Fail At Blogging 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 6 Unexpected Ways Journaling Every Day Will Make Your Life Better

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      Last Updated on July 8, 2020

      What Everyone Is Wrong About Achieving Inbox Zero

      What Everyone Is Wrong About Achieving Inbox Zero

      Ah, Inbox Zero. An achievement that so many of us long for. It’s elusive. It’s a productivity benchmark. It’s an ongoing battle.

      It’s also unnecessary.

      Don’t get me wrong, the way Inbox Zero was initially termed is incredibly valuable. Merlin Mann coined the phrase years ago and what he has defined it as goes well beyond the term itself.[1]

      Yet people have created their own definition of Inbox Zero. They’re not using it with the intent that Mann suggested. Instead, it’s become about having nothing left in immediate view. It’s become about getting your email inbox to zero messages or having an empty inbox on your desk that was once filled with papers. It’s become about removing visual clutter.

      But it’s not about that. Not at all.

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      Here’s what inbox zero actually is, as defined by Mann:

      “It’s about how to reclaim your email, your atten­tion, and your life. That “zero?” It’s not how many mes­sages are in your inbox–it’s how much of your own brain is in that inbox. Especially when you don’t want it to be. That’s it.” – Merlin Mann

      The Fake Inbox Zero

      The sense of fulfillment one gets from clearing out everything in your inbox is temporary at best, disappointing at worst. Often we find that we’re shooting for Inbox Zero just so that we can say that we’ve got “everything done that needed to be done”. That’s simply not the case.

      Certainly, by removing all of your things that sit in your inbox means that they are either taken care of or are well on their way to being taken care of. The old saying “out of sight, out of mind” is often applied to clearing out your inbox. But unless you’ve actually done something with the stuff, it’s either not worth having in your inbox in the first place or is still sitting in your “mental inbox”.

      You have to do something with the stuff, and for many people, that is a hard thing to do. That’s why Inbox Zero – as defined by Mann – is not achieved as often as many people would like to believe. It’s this “watered down” concept of Inbox Zero that is completed instead. You’ve got no email in your inbox and you’ve got no paper on your desk’s inbox. So that must mean you’re at Inbox Zero.

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      Until the next email arrives or the next document comes your way. Then you work to get rid of those as quickly as possible so that you can get back to Inbox Zero: The Lesser again. If it’s something that can be dealt with quickly, then you get there. But if they require more time, then soon you’ve got more stuff in your inboxes. So you switch up tasks to get to the things that don’t require as much time or attention so that you can get closer to this stripped down variation of Inbox Zero.

      However, until you deal with the bigger items, you don’t quite get there. Some people feel as if they’ve let themselves (or others) down if they don’t get there. And that, quite frankly, is silly. That’s why this particular version of Inbox Zero doesn’t work.

      The Ultimate Way to Get to Inbox Zero

      So what’s the ultimate way to get to Inbox Zero?

      Have zero inboxes.

      The inbox is meant to be a stop along the way to your final destination. It’s the place where stuff sits until you’re ready to put it in the place where it sits until you’re ready to deal with it.

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      So why not skip the inbox altogether? Why not put it in the place where it sits until you’re ready to deal with it? Because that requires immediate action. It means you need to give the item some thought and attention.

      You need to step back and look at it rather than file it. That’s why we have a catch-all inbox, both for email and for analog items. It allows us to only look at these things when we’re ready to do so.

      The funny thing is that we can decide when we’re ready to without actually looking at the inbox beforehand. We can look at things on our own watch rather than when we are alerted to or feel the need to.

      There is no reason why you need an inbox at all to store things for longer than it sits there before you see it. None. It’s a choice. And the choice you should be making is how to deal with things when you first see them, rather than when to deal with things you haven’t looked at yet.

      Stop Faking It

      Seeing things in your inboxes is simply using your sight. Looking at things in your inbox when you first see them is using insight.

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      Stop checking email more than twice per day. Turn off your alerts. Put your desk’s inbox somewhere that it can be accessed by others and only accessed by you when you’re ready to deal with what’s in it. Don’t put it on your desk – that’s productivity poison.

      If you want to get to Inbox Zero — the real Inbox Zero — then get rid of those stops along the way. You’ll find that by doing that, you’ll be getting more of the stuff you really want done finished much faster, rather than see them moving along at the speed of not much more than zero.

      More Productivity Tips to Get Organized

      Featured photo credit: Web Hosting via unsplash.com

      Reference

      [1] Merlin Mann: Inbox Zero

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