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Slogger 2 Turns Your Day One Journal Into an Automated Social Log

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Slogger 2 Turns Your Day One Journal Into an Automated Social Log

    We’ve been talking alot about journaling lately and the benefits that it can bring to your life, as well as the lives of your loved ones. But, what if you could turn your digital journaling into an awesome, automated digital tracking and logging system? Well, with a little geekery, the new Slogger 2, and Day One for the Mac, that automated digital logging system can be yours.

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    So, what the heck does this do?

    You can go check out Brett Terpstra’s site (the creator of Slogger) if you want the in depth explanation, but Slogger is basically a command line utility that allows you pull all of your data from different social networks and services like Flickr, GoodReads, Instapaper, Pinboard, Twitter, etc. and have it easily and beautifully imported into your Day One journal. If that sounds too good to be true, then you are in for a great surprise.

    With just a little bit of setup and execution (you will have to get into the command line) you can make Slogger start slogging it’s way to logging all of the stuff that you do online and is important to you. Something else to mention is that Slogger 2 has a plugin architecture that allows developers to add their own type of automated logging to the Slogger system.

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    Setup

    You need to be running a Mac with Day One installed on it. You can either be syncing your Day One journal with Dropbox or iCloud; Slogger 2 works with both. Next, go to the Slogger 2 github site and download the the archive and extract it. Once you have the files extracted to wherever you downloaded them, you can either keep them there or better, move them to your home directory in a folder called ‘slogger’.

      After moving all slogger files to my user directory

      Next go through the README.md file that Mr. Terpstra provides. It will give you some detailed instructions on how to make this work. I’m not going to reinvent the wheel here, just follow the steps inside of the README and you will be up and running in no time.

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      After doing the minimal setup and running Slogger you can go to your Day One journal and take a look at your well-formatted publicy accessible data.

      OK, so now what?

      It’s never good to just “hack” something together for the sake of hacking it together. So, what does this necessarily give you that can benefit your journaling habit?

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      1. A log of your online interactionsBeing able to log your Twitter interactions alone with Slogger is something that I feel is totally worth the entire setup process and continued use. One only drawback is that you can’t see the other end of a conversation (at this point). But, you can at least see what you have posted and favorited in the past, what music you were listening too, stories you were saving to read later, etc. This can be something very useful to look back on and link it to what you were thinking and writing about at that time.
      2. Track your development workWith the Gist logger integration, developers that use Github can take advantage of having a nice list of their commits in their Day One journal. If you don’t know what that means, then it isn’t for you :)
      3. Use the power of RSSOne of the best loggers that is included in Slogger 2 is the RSS logger which allows you to take any public RSS feed and have Slogger write out the day’s activity to your Day One journal. There are a lot of cool things you could do with RSS integration like log NASA’s photo of the day, log your completed tasks with Remember the Milk, keep all of the posts that you have made to your own blog, or even log all of your starred items in Google Reader. When it comes to the RSS integration with Slogger, you are limited to only to what you can come up with (as well as public RSS feeds).
      4. Logging it all automagicallyWhat I find to be the best part of Slogger is that all of this logging can be done automatically with little to no effort or work on my end. This is exactly what I want when it comes to logging and/or journaling my day; as little resistance as possible.Because of this automatic type of logging I get a very nice image of what I was thinking and doing on any specific day when I look back in my journal. To be able to see what you were doing, pictures you were taking, music you were listening to is a powerful and fun way to reflect.

      Slogger 2 is a very useful and awesome tool, but will prove itself to be even more useful the longer that you use it. As time passes it will be nostalgic to look through all of your data and see how it changes through the months and years.

      More by this author

      CM Smith

      A technologist and writer who shares advice on personal productivity, creativity and how to use technology to get things done.

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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