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Six Spam Filters for your Mac

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Six Spam Filters for your Mac
Six Spam Filters for your Mac

    Joe Kissell at EarthWeb.com has put together a good list of 6 programs Mac users can get to know if spam is becoming a problem.

    1) Em@ilCRX

    Price: $30

    Pros: Blacklist, whitelist, regular expression matching; image spam filtering; several other filtering options.
    Cons: No Bayesian filter; no IMAP support; no direct integration with email clients; cluttered interface; poor documentation.

    2) JunkMatcher

    Price: Free (donations accepted)

    Pros: Bayesian filter; regular expressions; wide variety of actions available for suspected spam.
    Cons: Complex UI; no universal binary version; nearly two years since last update.

    3) Personal Antispam X4

    Price: $50

    Pros: Bayesian filter; blacklist; whitelist; attachment checking; integrates well with Mail and Entourage.
    Cons: Adds lots of extra stuff (of questionable value) to your system; expensive.

    4) Spamfire

    Price: $40 (includes one-year subscription to filter updates; renewal costs range from $10 for one year to $35 for a permanent subscription).

    Pros: Automated setup for most clients works well; good configuration options.
    Cons: Weak IMAP support; poor integration with email clients; ongoing subscription cost is a drag.

    5) SpamSieve

    Price: $30

    Pros: Bayesian filter with adjustable sensitivity; blacklist; whitelist; regular expressions; excellent integration with email clients; nearly invisible operation.
    Cons: Limited actions available for suspected spam; some initial manual training required.

    6) SpamSweep

    Price: $25

    Pros: Bayesian filter; whitelist; domain and relay blacklists.
    Cons: No IMAP support; limited configuration options; awkward procedure for handling false positives; sketchy documentation.

    Check out Joe’s full review for each program, plus his conclusion on which is best here:

    Spam Filters for Your Mac: Six Choices – [EarthWeb]

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    Craig Childs

    Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

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    Last Updated on December 18, 2020

    Can Technology have Biases Like Humans?

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    Can Technology have Biases Like Humans?

    Technology has taken a vantage leap in providing solutions for man. Before now, technology used to appear complex and would require a great deal of expertise to handle solutions available. Today, we have technology applicable in the simplest human activities as smart products with intelligent algorithms powering them as they make error-free judgments and provide intelligent and analytic solutions.

    Does technology have all the answers?

    This article from Credit Suisse, tells us that technology does not have all the answers because it has been found to exhibit “similar biases,” as humans. No one can discredit the impact of technology, but it is not totally free of human input and this is the reason we experience these biases in many areas we have technology holding foot.

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    Creating technological solutions transparently

    This article suggests that the process of creating technological solutions be made transparent and subject to contribution from many people who would end up as users of the product – male, female, young, old, learned, unlearned and all other preferences as we have them. It also underscores the importance of having women on product development teams. This approach is not sure to eliminate all forms of bias, but it is a good way to start in order to appraise the full benefits of technology.

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    Technology as the connecting tool

    Technology so far has been a major connecting tool amongst us humans. It is used and appreciated by all regardless of race, language and sex. In order to keep it less subjective to these arguments about human biases. I believe we should gather opinions on products and solutions before making them available to the public. This could be done by gathering input from intended target users and receiving feedback across the stages of production.

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    “Recognizing the problem is a start…success will depend on inclusive technologies that meet this vast untapped market.” This cannot be more apt especially at a time when we look up to technology for solutions. We should not muzzle our progress with technology by battling algorithm bias. The first way to avoid this battle is by reading this article here.

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