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PS4 vs Xbox One: Which gaming console should you choose?

PS4 vs Xbox One: Which gaming console should you choose?

So, you’ve decided to purchase a gaming console. The two options you will most likely be considering are the PS4 and Xbox One, the two current generation offerings from Sony and Microsoft.

Which should you get? I’ll investigate that question, and compare the two consoles in a number of ways.

Specs

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    I could paint an overly technical picture for you, but let’s not over-complicate matters too much. The bottom line is that both the PS4 and Xbox One are about five times more powerful than their predecessors, the PS3 and Xbox 360. Each is equipped with a CPU that, for all intents and purposes, is an exact copy of the other. The only difference is that the Xbox One’s CPU is clocked faster, meaning it has about a 10% edge over the PS4’s CPU.

    On the other hand, the PS4 has a more powerful Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Truthfully, you really won’t notice the difference while playing games. At the end of the day, both consoles are around the same strength, with the PS4 taking a slight lead in some instances.

    Both consoles come with eight gigabytes (GB) of RAM, though each console uses a different format. The PS4 uses GDDR5, which is faster than the DDR3 in the Xbox One. The end user won’t really feel the difference, as the Xbox comes equipped with a few megabytes of embedded memory that allow it to match the PS4 in most instances where RAM performance is a factor.

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    If you are choosing on specs alone, there really isn’t a clear victor. For context, both consoles perform about as well as a current low-end gaming PC.

    Price

    US-E3-SONY-PLAYSTATION-PRESS CONFERENCE

      Were this article written in the fall of 2013, the PS4 would be the winner of this category. However, since then, Microsoft has shifted its strategy. Whereas the Xbox One used to be $499, $100 more than the PS4, it now sells for $349, and often comes bundled with a game worth $60.

      The Xbox One’s original price hurt it greatly, causing gamers to flock to the $399 PS4, which had greater apparent value at the time. Now that the tables have turned, you’d probably be better off choosing the Xbox One if you want to save a few bucks, especially if you can find one of the better bundles.

      Today, the PS4 is still $399, while the Xbox One can be bought for either $349 without the Kinect camera, or $449 with it included. That said, be on the look out for special deals and bundles that pop up from time to time, as you may be able to save even more by going with those.

      Design

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      Designz3

        Design is of course as much about personal preference as anything. That said, it’s an important factor in determining what you buy. The Xbox One has something of a monolithic design, sacrificing portability for a boxy, weighty, unassuming look. To me, it looks like a large VCR or DVD player. Perhaps that was the intent, as Microsoft’s hope is for the Xbox One to be the main attraction of your home entertainment setup.

        The PS4 is less generic, with a stylized design that seems to harken back to the PS2. It’s far more compact compared to the Xbox One, and looks more like a gaming machine than the Xbox.

        If you want something that will blend in seamlessly next to your DVD player and cable box, the Xbox One is a good choice. If you want to have something a bit more flashy, the PS4 will probably appeal to you more.

        Games

        Gamesz4

          By and large, the game libraries on these consoles are essentially the same. If you are mainly into sports games or cross platform shooters, like Call of Duty, both consoles will serve you well.

          Where the two consoles diverge is in their exclusive offerings. At the moment, neither really has a decent library of exclusives, but that will change by the end of this year with blockbusters like Uncharted 4 and Halo 5 being released for the PS4 and Xbox One, respectively.

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          If you grew up playing Halo and enjoy the lore and gameplay of that franchise, the Xbox One is your console. On the flip side, if you loved traversing the globe as Nathan Drake, the PS4 is for you. PS4 owners also have access to a larger indie game library, so that’s something to keep in mind as well.

          Again, it’s a personal choice, and really depends on which consoles you’ve owned in the past. Those of us who owned Xbox 360s will feel more of an affinity to the exclusives on the One, and vice versa.

          Controllers and peripherals

          Controllerz5

            As strange as it may seem, many gamers choose a console based on the feel of their controller. Having used both, I have to say that I prefer the Xbox One’s controller a bit more, mainly because my hands are pretty large and I feel a little cramped using the analog sticks on the PS4 controllers.

            Of course, your mileage may vary. Both controllers have received a lot of praise from gamers of all shapes, sizes, and experiences, so what might be a good idea for you is to test each and see what works for you.

            Additionally, both the Xbox and PS4 can be used with a high-tech camera device that you can purchase separately. If you are choosing mainly on the capability of this peripheral, the Xbox’s Kinect is better than the PS4’s offering, as it was designed to integrate seamlessly into the Xbox experience (originally, it shipped with every Xbox, which is, in part, why it used to cost so much).

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            Backwards compatibility

            backwards6

              Sadly, neither consoles have backward compatibility capabilities, meaning you can’t play your old 360 or PS3 games on the new machines. If either Microsoft or Sony figure out a way to include this feature at some point in the future, that would be a huge factor in picking one console over the other (since so many of us have a large library of last-generation games).

              Conclusion

              In my opinion, you really can’t go wrong with either the Xbox One or the PS4. To me, the most important factor is whether or not you will enjoy the exclusive games offered by each console. Are you a Halo devotee? A Fable fanatic? A Gran Turismo phenom? An Uncharted aficionado? If you picked the first two, get an Xbox. If you chose the latter, the PS4 is for you. These are gaming consoles, after all, so the other factors really don’t matter all that much compared to the joy you get from playing actual games on your device.

              I hope this outline helped in your decision making process. Whichever console you choose, I have no doubt that your craving for gaming will be sufficiently satisfied for the next several years.

              Featured photo credit: Gaming Consoles/Mark Farrell via flickr.com

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              Last Updated on May 14, 2019

              8 Replacements for Google Notebook

              8 Replacements for Google Notebook

              Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

              1. Zoho Notebook
                If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
              2. Evernote
                The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
              3. Net Notes
                If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
              4. i-Lighter
                You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
              5. Clipmarks
                For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
              6. UberNote
                If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
              7. iLeonardo
                iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
              8. Zotero
                Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

              I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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              In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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