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3D Printing: What You Should Know About This Amazing Technology

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3D Printing: What You Should Know About This Amazing Technology

Three-dimensional printing is a remarkable technology that is sure to change the world as we know it. In fact, it has already affected things in some big ways. People are making items for a lower price than ever before with 3D printing, and some are even creating things that were not even possible prior to the invention of the recent technology.

So how did 3D printing come to be? What are some examples of the amazing technology’s huge potential? Read about that and more below.

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1. What 3D printing is

The process of 3D printing is a complicated one, but here is an attempt to sum it up: a virtual design is made in a file that either uses a 3D modeling program to create something new or a 3D printer to duplicate something that already exists. The software for 3D printing “slices” the design into hundreds or thousands of separate layers. The 3D printer will then blend all those layers together into one physical object.

2. A brief history of 3D printing

It has been around for decades, but until recently, the only 3D printing option was industrial printing. Industrial 3D printing was mainly used in the creation of prototypes with a technique referred to as rapid prototyping. The industrial 3D printers cost tens of thousands of dollars, but they were indispensable to companies in need of rapid prototyping or manufacturing, and it was a quick way to produce a relatively small number of products in a short period of time.

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What’s known as either personal or domestic 3D printing started around 2011. Rapid development in the industry has led to less expensive 3D printers priced at $250 for the simpler versions to $2,500 for the high-end ones. The hobbyist market really gained ground with open-source 3D printing projects. Thanks to those, anyone could put together their own 3D printer and have access to a large number of designs, making the process extremely appealing to a wide number of consumers.

It isn’t just for fun, though; 3D-printing technology is expected to make an impact in the developing world by making it cheaper and easier to dispense crucial resources to people who are in desperate need of them.

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3. Applications of 3D printing

Among its many other potential uses, 3D printing can be utilized for such things as architecture, healthcare, education, creativity, retail, and general entertainment.

4. Stunning examples

Some things you can use 3D printing for are to improve a living situation, improve lives, and even save lives. As this article from IFLScience explains, a man named Andrey Rudenko printed a small castle with concrete through the magic of 3D printing. He hopes to expand to building medium-sized houses more affordably with the power of 3D printing.

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The tool is also commonly used to create prosthetics. Check out this delightful piece from the Huffington Post (which includes a video) about an adorable dog who was able to run for the first time because of some high-tech three-dimensional printing.

Beyond even that, though, 3D printing is literally saving lives. A newborn baby’s complex surgery was made easier when doctors were able to print out a 3D version of the little patient’s heart. With that to study, the surgeon only needed to do one (successful) surgery.

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It’s amazing all that 3D printing has accomplished in its relatively short existence. That list of feats will only grow as scientists and developers further expand the potential of the incredible devices. Be warned that some of the changes might not necessarily be good (consider its possible impact on employment; I doubt it will take as many people to build a 3D printed house than one made by hand) but it’s still going to be incredibly exciting to see where the technology goes next.

Featured photo credit: 3D Printer at the Fab Lab/Keith Kissel via flickr.com

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Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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