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How to Protect Your Phone From Malware

How to Protect Your Phone From Malware

Protecting your computer from viruses and malware is second nature for most people, but many users don’t apply the same level of diligence to their smartphones. In December 2011, Kaspersky Lab detected 82,000 malware variations just waiting to pounce on vulnerable phones. What is even more astonishing is NBC reported that 25% of Americans would rather surf the web on their smartphone than a computer, and 68% of smartphone owners check the internet or email daily. With the growing trend away from computers and towards smartphones, it is more important than ever to protect yourself from malware. Start the new year right with these tactics for protecting your phone in 2013.

Use Reliable App Sources

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    The number one thing you can do to protect your phone from malware is be careful about where you get your apps from. Only download apps from reliable sources—this is especially important for Android users. Most malware programs target vulnerable Android users specifically, so be sure to get your apps through reliable stores like the Android Market and Amazon Appstore.

    Research each new app before you download it: learn about the developer and any other apps they have created. Read the professional and user reviews to see if there are any deficiencies or bugs in the application, and read through the details to see if there is anything in the description of the application that raises red flags. It’s time-consuming to read the fine print with new apps, but it’s ultimately worth the effort and will help you protect your phone from dangerous malware.

    Set a Password

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      The main purpose of malware is to disrupt operations or gather private/sensitive information so one step that can be taken to protect your phone from outside sources is to set a password to lock your screen. It may not be malware protection exactly, but it is spyware protection and a great way to defend against intrusions. Passwords may seem like a hassle when you use at the device several times an hour to check messages, use apps, or play games, but it is really the best way to prevent anyone else from accessing your personal information without your permission.

      If you accidentally leave your phone in a public place, your password will make sure that no one else can gain access to your personal information. The advancement of technology has also helped improve security purposes: take the touch screen LG phone called “eXpo” for instance, which will allow you to use your fingerprint instead of a password—probably the most secure measure that can be taken to protect your phone.

      To further limit the risks associated with a lost phone, make sure you have a “find my phone” app. This will allow you to pinpoint the GPS location of your phone with a computer or other smartphone once you’re logged in to the proper program. The faster you get your phone back, the less opportunity hackers will have to play around with the device and potentially work past your password protection.

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      Install Malware Protection

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        Just as you can download virus protection for your computer, so too can you use this type of software to protect your phone.  With the movement away from computers and towards smartphones for internet use, we will begin to see a growth in cellular malware, so having a protection program for your smartphone will become increasingly important. The most popular program is Lookout Mobile Security for Android phones. This program will fill in the gaps and give you complete and comprehensive protection from malware attacks. Since the frequency of viruses is imminent, protection software is essential to prevent Malware in 2013.

        Update Your Operating System

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          Be sure to continually update your operating system as soon as a new version becomes available, as running an outdated OS is a great invitation for malware to penetrate your defenses. System developers work hard to stay ahead of malware and give you ample protection, but you can’t take advantage of this protection if you don’t take the time to update your software as often as possible. Not only does this protect you against malware, but it also keeps your smartphone running in the best state. Just as you wouldn’t drive your car around with outdated tires and brakes, you shouldn’t use your smartphone with outdated operating software.

          As the popularity of smartphones increases, so does the need to protect yourself from intrusive malware and spyware. Whether it is to fend off viruses or other forms of outside intrusion, steps need to be taken to ensure the safety of your phone and your personal information. If you’re smart about how you use your mobile device, you can protect it effectively from malware threats. Keep aware, and you can have a safe, virus-free phone in 2013.

           

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          Last Updated on May 14, 2019

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

          1. Zoho Notebook
            If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
          2. Evernote
            The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
          3. Net Notes
            If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
          4. i-Lighter
            You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
          5. Clipmarks
            For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
          6. UberNote
            If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
          7. iLeonardo
            iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
          8. Zotero
            Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

          I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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          In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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