Advertising
Advertising

Mailbox Review: The Best Email Client Ever

Mailbox Review: The Best Email Client Ever

mailbox-logo-big

    For years, my email was always a place that was bittersweet. While I enjoyed the email messages that I received, I dreaded the lack of organization that the inbox contained. As an iOS user, there wasn’t really an option that brought an optimal emailing experience. One thing I can tell you is that this has certainly changed with Mailbox for iOS. Not only has my experience changed, Mailbox has revolutionized the way that I personally look at the importance of email. Mailbox is currently accepting reservations, so let’s cut to the chase and talk about the app’s strengths, weaknesses, and potential.

    How is Mailbox different?

    The developers behind Mailbox saw how people were using email as a task manager. Think about it, if you receive an email from your editor or boss about an upcoming meeting or a new assignment. Chances are, you’ll take that task and add it into whatever tool is needed to complete that task. Mailbox prevents you from having to do that last step. When we go a bit deeper into this review, you’ll understand what I mean by this and how Mailbox has way more to offer as well. To learn more about the story behind Mailbox and why they are organizing your email workflow differently, click here.

    The Three Tabs – Later, Now, Completed

    Mailbox_ThreeTabs_1

      When you look at the interface of Mailbox, you instantly see that there are three tabs at the top. The first tab is the “Later” page where you can scoot emails off for another time or date. Similar to a task app, we can essentially remind ourselves through the email to either reply back, read later, or do what the email is asking us to do.

      Advertising

      Mailbox_ThreeTabs_2

        The second tab is the meat of Mailbox. This is where you’ll find the emails you have to take a look at now. Think of the “Mailbox” page as the stack of papers on your desk that needs to be sorted soon. All new messages come here, and all emails that you added to “Later” and that have reached their due date are moved back here for you to deal with.

        Mailbox_ThreeTabs_3

          The third and last tab is where you’ll find your completed emails. These are the emails that have been replied to, or in other words, emails you can forget about. Aside from the three tabs, you also have a button that reveals more options and a compose button on the left and right side, respectively. How do emails get to their tabs? That’s the magic of Mailbox.

          How it Works

          You interact with and place messages in their tab by swiping them. The options that sliding presents you depends on which tab you are in, so let’s go through what options you can do.

          First off, you can create Lists in Mailbox that allows you to have better organization of your email. I personally only have a “Read at Home” List, reserved for emails I want to focus more on in the comforts of – yes you guessed correctly – my own home. You can also swipe a message to read at another time. This is known as “Snooze”and sends the email to be dealt with later.

          Advertising

          Mailbox_NavigatingAround_SnoozeOptions

            Snoozing Options

            • Later in the Today
            • This Evening
            • Tomorrow
            • This Weekend
            • Next Week
            • In a Month
            • Someday
            • Or….Pick a Date

            The third swipe option is to add an email to your “Mailbox” (remember, the “stack on your desk” we equated this tab to). Finally, you can check off emails and send them off to the completed tab, or mark them with an “X” to send them to the trash.

            When are these options available?

            Mailbox_NavigatingAround_OptionsLater

              In the “Later” tab…

              • You can swipe partially to the left to adjust snoozing times, or fully to the left to add it to a List. Swiping partially to the right places the message back into your “Mailbox”, fully swiping to the right adds the message to the completed tab.

              Advertising

              Mailbox_NavigatingAround_MailboxTab

                In your “Mailbox” tab…

                • You can swipe partially to the left to snooze a message or fully to the left to add it to one of your Lists. Swiping partially to the right allows you to add a message to the completed folder, fully swiping adds the message to the trash.

                Mailbox_NavigatingMailbox_MailboxSlide

                  In the completed tab…

                  • Finally, you can swipe a message partially to the left to bring it back to the “Mailbox” pile. Swiping fully to the left allows you to snooze the message. Swipe to the right to add the message to the trash.

                  Lists and Snoozing Options can be found in the settings of Mailbox. You can also reorder messages by tapping and holding a message, then sliding it to the place you’d like. Scrolling to the very bottom of a small list of messages outside of the completed tab and sliding the bottom bar either direction can also mass manipulate the messages there.

                  Goal – Reaching Inbox Zero

                  Mailbox_ReachingZero

                    If you don’t know by now, the ultimate goal of Mailbox is for you to have an empty “Mailbox” each day. This isn’t only by ensuring that you answer back to all emails, but that they are truly taken care of. This is why Mailbox has the “Later” tab, allowing you to feel accomplished without feeling stretched thin to complete everything in one day (more about this later in the article). Once you reach zero, Mailbox presents you with a featured photo of the day from Instagram as a small treat to your success.

                    Advertising

                    A New Philosophy – Email as a To-Do List

                    Philosophy_Mailbox_1

                      I have been using Mailbox for a little over a week now and I must say that it has changed the way I view emailing. Before, I obsessively checked my email throughout the day. I felt that if I got an email, tackled what needed to get done, I could in some way make my day more productive.

                      Mailbox showed me this wasn’t the case. When looking at email as a to-do list, we learn that we don’t have to take tasks as they are given to us. We can make a list and tackle them in an orderly fashion. This allowed me to not stress over email and to take it a step at a time.

                      Philosophy_Mailbox_2

                        I found Mailbox to be a great application during my usage so far. You may not like having to wait for their reservation, however the line seems to be moving well for many individuals. It is important to remember that a waiting list is needed to keep Mailbox up and running, protecting the servers from strain.

                        Philosophy_Mailbox_3

                           

                          There are a couple of things we don’t like. Mailbox is Gmail only, prevented me from fully switching over for good. I make use of Yahoo Mail (7 years strong) and iCloud for my personal emailing, and Gmail for work emailing (and a bit of personal emailing too). Ultimately, Mailbox is free and this is a great reason to give the app a try.

                          More by this author

                          10 Meal Planning Apps You Need To Have To Get Healthier Easily The 50 Best Desktop Wallpapers for 2013 23 Awesome Travel Hacks That Add Fun To Your Trip How to Stay in Good Shape During Black Friday 9 Apps Unrelated to Black Friday That Are Helpful

                          Trending in iOS

                          1 15 iPhone Alarms That Wake You Up Right Away 2 12 iPhone 6 Tricks You Probably Don’t Know But Should 3 30 Incredible Things Your iPhone Can Do 4 21 Must-Have Free iPhone Apps You Can’t Miss 5 15 Must-Have Apps For Your iPhone

                          Read Next

                          Advertising
                          Advertising
                          Advertising

                          Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                          Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                          Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                          Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                          So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                          Joe’s Goals

                          Advertising

                             

                            Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                            Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                            Daytum

                              Daytum

                              is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

                              Advertising

                              Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                              Excel or Numbers

                                If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                                What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                                Evernote

                                Advertising

                                  I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                                  Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                                  Access or Bento

                                    If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                                    Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

                                    Advertising

                                    You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                                    Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                                    All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                                    Conclusion

                                    I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                                    What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

                                    Read Next