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List Your Adventures With Diddit

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List Your Adventures With Diddit

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    We make lists of everything we want to do, whether it’s the errands we need to run on the way home or the things we want to do before we turn a certain age. But what about the stuff we’ve already done? Sharing the things we’ve already done — and enjoyed is the relatively simple idea behind Diddit. Rather than making lists about the adventures you’re going to have, Diddit’s emphasis is on the amazing things you’ve already done.

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    The Diddit Basics

    Diddit collects experiences across a wide variety of categories: whether you’ve ate at a particular restaurant, visited a certain location or tried a particular sport, you can check off those adventures off your Diddit list. While that seems like a very basic site idea — and perhaps not particularly appealing for people of a certain mindset — there are layers to using the site that can make Diddit worth the visit.

    One of the features of Diddit is the ability to network with your friends. Importing a set of friends from another system is relatively easy and you can create lists of things you’ve done — and would recommend for a specific friend — and pass them along. For instance, there are several road trip lists that follow an interstate or highway across the country, pointing out the best stops and side trips.

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    Most items on your lists will be one word: a popular list of animals seen includes 242 animal names. But you aren’t limited to that simple title. You can photos and stories to give a bigger picture of the experiences you share on Diddit. You can do the same on other people’s lists. You can suggest items to add to a particular list, along with your own adventures.

    The Other People on Diddit

    Those pictures and stories shared on Diddit are an opportunity for anyone interested in finding new things to do. By digging around in the ‘Food & Drink’ category, you can find lists of restaurants in your area to try out. You can find new things to do in just about every other category, too: no matter what area your passion falls into, the odds are pretty good that you’ll find something new to do.

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    When it comes to planning out the trips I want to take, or the other goals I have outside of work, I sometimes find myself at a loss for where I should head next. Just browsing through the things that other people have posted to Diddit, though, has started me thinking about a whole list of things I want to do in the future. Diddit has made it easy to keep track of all those incoming ideas, too: if you come across something on the site that someone else has done, you can mark it ‘wanna do it.’ Diddit compiles all of items you mark as such into one big ‘wanna do’ list.

    So far, there are over 300,000 different activities in Diddit’s database. It isn’t just user-generated, either: Diddit has generated lists and activity descriptions by crawling the web. That’s definitely a benefit to a relatively new site. Diddit won’t need to work up to a level of critical mass in order to be useful for its users.

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    Even if you’re one of those people who can never find anything to do, you might just manage to come across something awesome just by browsing through all the options. Ludic Labs — the company that created Diddit — has stated on its website that “There is a 100% chance that you will find something to do at Diddit.com.” That’s a pretty big promise, but Ludic Labs seems to manage it. Much of Ludic Labs’ staff seems to have come directly from Inktomi, a company which was acquired by Yahoo in 2002.

    Even after only spending a little time on Diddit, I’ve found it addictive. I want to mark off more things that I’ve done, create my own lists and go hunting for new things to do. I’ve even got a list of new foods I want to try — I plan to add a couple of them to my shopping cart during my next trip to the grocery store so that I can move them from ‘wanna do’ to diddit. To a certain extent, I think it’s also possible to use Diddit to rate certain activities, like visiting a particular restaurant or hiking a particular trail. However, the wide variety of experiences that Diddit catalogs isn’t quite ideal as a directory to rely on for specific restaurant recommendations. For those nights when you just want to try a new place, though, Diddit can narrow down your options fast.

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    Creating a Diddit Account

    Accounts on Diddit are free and take only a moment to set up. You can spend as little or as much time filling out a Diddit profile as you want: I haven’t seen many profiles with tons of information, though. Instead, the real information is in the lists you choose to share and the adventures you can check off on your own Diddit list. You can also give and receive ‘toasts’ — comments and compliments shared between Diddit users. I haven’t quite figured out why they’re called toasts (rather than comments), but it does offer a way to comment and even ask questions on the adventures you might want to take in the future.

    If you have a Diddit account, let us know how you’re enjoying the site in the comments. Got a favorite list? Please share it!

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    Last Updated on November 25, 2021

    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

    There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

    Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

      What Does Private Browsing Do?

      When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

      For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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      The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

      The Terminal Archive

      While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

      Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

      dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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      Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

      Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

      However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

      Clearing Your Tracks

      Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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      dscacheutil -flushcache

      As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

      Other Browsers and Private Browsing

      Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

      If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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      As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

      Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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