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LinkedIn for iOS: Stay Connected with Style

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LinkedIn for iOS: Stay Connected with Style

If you’re a LinkedIn addict like we are here — we’ve discussed ways to create an online resume and how to use your LinkedIn data to create a stunning visual resume — and have an iPad (again, like we do…and we’ve told you pretty much everything you need to know about it too) then you’ve probably been waiting for a real LinkedIn app for the iPad.

Sure, LinkedIn has had an official iPhone app for a while. Sure, you could use the app on your iPad in 2X mode. But that’s hardly fun is it?

Well, I’m happy to let you know that your long (long, long) wait is finally over.

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Yes, LinkedIn has updated their iOS app to fully support both the iPhone and iPad. Oh, and not just support the iPad, but support the new iPad with Retina graphics and a gorgeously simple UI that, well…you just have to see for yourself. So, LinkedIn for iOS is a go.

Here is what my Home Screen looks like on my iPad:

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    And here’s the News Screen:

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      Both screens look as great as they are useful. Looking for news from your connections? Yeah it’s there. Groups? Tap. Got it. Now you might expect the iPhone version of this app to be, well, similar right? Sure, you’re correct—and wrong too. LinkedIn took the right features and layout from the new iPad version and applied them to the iPhone as well. Now, some of these features appeared in a recent update to the iPhone app, but I think LinkedIn added some nice touched to the iPhone version that came from putting the spit and polish on the iPad version. In case you don’t believe me, here are some screens from my iPhone:

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          In a side-by-side comparison of the two LinkedIn for iOS apps on my iPhone 4 and iPad (3rd gen), I think LinkedIn is aiming the iPad to be more of a content consumption and creation tool, while the iPhone app more of a connections tool. For example on the iPhone you can download all of your LinkedIn connections to your address book. I couldn’t find that on the iPad (of course if you sync your contacts with iCloud it doesn’t matter, really). Reading updates and news from my connections, groups, and other sources is great on the iPad, but a wee cramped on the iPhone.

          Bottom line: if you only have an iPhone and use the LinkedIn app you have a great tool to manage and tap into your connections. If you only have an iPad, the app lets you read about your connections, and connect too. Now if you have both devices…then I think you have the total package.

          Download LinkedIn for iOS (iPhone and iPad) for yourself and let us know in the comments if these apps will encourage you to use LinkedIn more — or maybe in a new way than you did before.

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          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

            What Does Private Browsing Do?

            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

            The Terminal Archive

            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

            Clearing Your Tracks

            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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            dscacheutil -flushcache

            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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