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Kick Email to the Curb and Get Things Done with Asana and Inbox

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Kick Email to the Curb and Get Things Done with Asana and Inbox

Imagine never having to leave your task manager to check email. And having complete context and control over the communications sent as a result?

Well, you don’t need to imagine that anymore. Because today the popular collaborative task management solution Asana has delivered it in the form of Inbox.

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The goal of Inbox is to “push team communication further into the post-email world”. Many individuals and organizations are far too reliant on email applications and services as task management solutions. With Inbox, the team at Asana looks to treat email as it was initially intended – as a means to communicate.

“Organizations are starting to feel the constraints of email. With email, you’re at the mercy of the sender, Inbox makes Inbox Zero the path of least resistance.” — Justin Rosenstein, Asana

Inbox doesn’t just allow for communication, it allows for “rich” communication. Inbox gives you everything you need regarding the work that’s going on, so you have context within the communication that is easily accessible and not buried throughout in-line messages or threaded responses. Additionally, you can customize what communications you receive in Inbox, meaning that you can stay informed and not overwhelmed – something that email tends to cause. You’re no longer “at the mercy of the sender” – you have control.

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    Inbox has taken some of the better-known (and perhaps “loved”) part of email and brought it into Inbox. But unlike traditional email, archiving of mail is done by default. This can be adjusted, but through the use of “flagging” you can keep on top of deferred messages without cluttering up your communications. That is just one of the way that Inbox works towards helping you get to that elusive Inbox Zero state more efficiently and effectively.

    Asana has always been impressive in terms of its speed. It syncs and updates quickly and easily — and Inbox is no different. With Inbox, updates to tasks and projects are grouped together in a way that makes sense to the user, allowing for quick scanning of new information without having to open each thread individually. This makes the process of using email within Asana seem like it’s not using email at all. And that’s because it goes beyond email.

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    The best part of this new feature? With Inbox, you can do all of your relevant communication without opening any form of email app or website in the process. That means less distraction and more focus. There’s a flow that occurs naturally that Inbox offers that you simply can’t get from email. Keep in mind that you can go as deep into the addition of Inbox as you’d like; align it for work projects, home projects or all aspects of your life. Again, you have control – which is something that many of us tend to lose when it comes to email.

    If you’ve been looking for an all-in-one task management solution, one that allows for collaborative and individual use and keeps you moving forward instead of from side to side then there’s no better time than ever to give Asana a look. By bringing Inbox into the mix, the Asana team has provided users with the means to get out of their email app and get onto the task at hand – all without missing a message. Or a beat.

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    (For more details on today’s launch of Inbox, head over to the Asana blog.)

    More by this author

    Mike Vardy

    A productivity specialist who shows you how to define your day, funnel your focus, and make every moment matter.

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    Last Updated on November 25, 2021

    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

    There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

    Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

      What Does Private Browsing Do?

      When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

      For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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      The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

      The Terminal Archive

      While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

      Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

      dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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      Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

      Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

      However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

      Clearing Your Tracks

      Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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      dscacheutil -flushcache

      As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

      Other Browsers and Private Browsing

      Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

      If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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      As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

      Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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