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How to Share Sensitive Information Over the Web

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How to Share Sensitive Information Over the Web

When people think about sending “sensitive” information, they usually associate it with one of two things: work stuff or inappropriate pictures. With that being said, there are a bunch of reasons you might want to share sensitive information over the web.

We are going to talk about a few ways to do just that, but let you decide what the “sensitive information” actually is.

Common sense

Sending important information to the wrong person can be a big problem so the first thing you will want to do is make sure you have the correct contact information. No matter how you plan to send someone information, make sure you have the correct email address or phone number for them.

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Not putting all of your eggs in one basket

Not many people consider breaking up messages or sending them through different services. For example, you can share a file or folder with someone via Dropbox with an encrypted zip file in it and text them the password key. If you send everything, including the password, in a single file, what’s the point in password protecting it?

Browser check

Depending on what exactly you are sending, you might want to consider using a secure browser — a browser like Dell KACE based on Firefox or one that’s more geared toward privacy like SRWare based on Chromium. These can help you be a bit more at ease when you are browsing or logging into your accounts.

Lastpass is a browser add-on that can share passwords and secure notes with other Lastpass users easily. This is a great way for you to send bank information or other things like Social Security numbers. Remember the common sense rule: you need to make sure you have the right user information before you start sending info to some random person.

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    Encryption methods

    Dropbox users have some choices. You can share a folder, letting you add any kind of information to the folder for the other person to receive. Another option: if the person is not a Dropbox user, you can send them a link to the folder or file. This way they can view or download it right from the web vs. you sending the file via email.

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    send-securely-share-dropbox

      To add a little more security when sending a file, you can send it as an encrypted zip file.Then if someone intercepts your email, they will need the password key to open it. If you send the password separately, someone is less likely to know what the password is or what it is for. A great app for making a secure compressed folder is 7zip. You could also add the encrypted zip file to your Dropbox shared folder for a little added security.

      When you want to email something but need it to be secure, you can try Sendinc. Using this web-based service will not only let you send secure emails, but you can have the message self destruct Mission-Impossible-style anywhere from 1 day to 365 days later.

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      send-securely-sendinc

        Another cool way to send files securely is to use something like File Camouflage. In a nutshell, you can use File Camouflage to hide and encrypt a file within an image. If someone accidentally sees the email, unless they know there is a message in it, they will think it is nothing more than an image.

        Mobile sharing

        snapchat 3
          snapchat 1
            snapchat

              Sharing information while mobile is a lot trickier. Some of the apps out there like Lastpass remove the sharing feature from their mobile app. Apps like Snapchat are available and the image can be deleted after a certain amount of time, but the image can still be easily intercepted or copied with a screen capture.

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              Final words

              There is always the chance something you send electronically can get intercepted by someone other than the intended receiver. It is best to break up the messages, send the password separately, encrypt what you can whenever you can, and do your best to only send people images of what you aren’t afraid to have your grandma come across in the internet.

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              Last Updated on November 25, 2021

              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

              There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

              Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                What Does Private Browsing Do?

                When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                The Terminal Archive

                While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                Clearing Your Tracks

                Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                dscacheutil -flushcache

                As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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