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How to Make Email Collaboration Easier with Grexit

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How to Make Email Collaboration Easier with Grexit

During my working day there are many times were I need to share an email between several people to see, or delegate emails to the right person. Likewise, they may need to forward emails for me to handle.This usually involves forwarding emails, writing new emails to explain what it’s all about. Often, information is lost from the flow of replies and back and forth ping ponging of emails between different people, particularly if it’s a group email. The context is lost because it can be locked in someone else’s email box, or you are only CC’d into the conversation half way through. Another situation that occurs when this arises is when someone goes on vacation and the emails they receive need to be actioned upon, but the email gets lost in their inbox. Auto-forwarding all emails to someone else inundates them with email, many of which may not be relevant to them.. and what happens if that person is off sick? The emails become unanswered or you end up with a long chain of auto-forwarded emails…email nightmare.

So I tried out Grexit, an email collaboration tool, on my Gmail account to try to solve this problem.  It’s a tool that lets you share email via custom tags, and has a stored central repository for all those emails that are shared between people. This means if a tag is applied to an email, anyone who has access to that tag, can see the email. Useful for splitting up work to individuals and between topics, with a good overview of who’s handing what and how it’s progressing.

How to use Grexit

After creating an account, and integrating it into my Gmail, it’s pretty easy to get going. At the end of each email I receive I see this box

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    Clicking on the Send to Grexit button reveals these options –

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      This allows me to select a tag, or create a new tag. After I submit it to Grexit, it’s saved in a repository. The repository can be configured for access on the Grexit website, this means that anyone you give access to can view these emails. You can control who sees which tags. The tags sit on the left handside of your gmail.

      Doesn’t clog up your inbox.

      One useful thing about the tags, is when emails are shared to it, they don’t all appear in your inbox. This would make it a nightmare if this were the case, in fact they sit under the tag with the number of unviewed messages displayed. It’s already segregated out, which means there is no need to manage your inbox. It’s possible to create multiple tags which means you can have different ‘inboxes’ for different shared email groups.

      Filters are your friend

      Setting up rules in Gmail can automatically place emails into the shared emailed boxes which means you don’t have to forward them. An example of how this works is in a sales organisation. People may send emails to general sales@company.com. If you create a rule that tags this email with the shared tag of ‘sales leads’, then everyone in the sales team can see this email. If you set up more tags for each sales person, when someone picks up that  email, they can change the tags to their own name. Easy to see who is handling which sales inquiry, and which sales leads have not been taken up and needs handling.

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      If the sales enquiry needs to be handed over, the whole email conversation is still stored. Simply change the tag to the new responsible person. They will see the whole email history. Delegation and shared responsibility of email actions are much simpler using Grexit. It can be used in this way for project management by assigning tasks via email and splitting the work load via tags, likewise for customer support or just freeflow of information.

      Discipline & Filters

      To use it effectively, it’s important you create a process of how you intend this to work with email collaborators. For this reason, I recommend using it with filters, because it helps to shift and automate the process of tagging. For workflow control it’s important to handle tags so that they get assigned appropriately.

      Grexit is a tool that can aid your collaboration and email productivity by taking away the hassle of forwarding, cc’ing emails, and keeps group emails organized. It helps with email workflow and making sure that the right people take action on the emails that are relevant to them,a little bit of discipline is needed to get the best out of the tool and it will save you from losing important emails that would otherwise be lost in the cc and forwarded email circus.

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       Disclosure: We were looking for this type of solution and came across Grexit. After trying it out for a while, Grexit provided us with an upgrade so that we could review the tool thoroughly. 

      Featured photo credit:  Smiling woman sending messages with her mobile phone via Shutterstock

      More by this author

      Hoi Wan

      Hoi is a mobilist who blogs about technology trends and productivity.

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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