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How to Cut to the Front of the Line at (Almost) Any Restaurant

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How to Cut to the Front of the Line at (Almost) Any Restaurant

We’re taught from a young age how to behave in line; to form a single file and wait our turn. Civilized society depends upon such etiquette, but eventually, we realize these rules don’t apply to everyone. Pretty people, for example, never seem to wait in line at a club—go figure.

cut into line

    Imagine how much time you could save if you didn’t have to waste it standing in line for lattes and lobster rolls? These iPhone apps will let you order ahead, so not only will you stride up to the front of the line, but your purchase will be waiting for you when you get there.

    Snap a Finger and Skip the Line

     

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    snapfinger

      Snapfinger is your ticket to the front of the line at some of America’s most popular chain restaurants. Whether your town has a Restaurant Row or Strip Mall, chances are it has one of the 561,000 restaurants serviced by the Snapfinger app. Pre-order and skip the line at fast food places including Baja Fresh, Pick Up Stix and Zaxbys, or speed up your take-out order at casual restaurants like Yard House, Outback Steakhouse and Rock Bottom Restaurants where you can send your order directly to the kitchen and have it waiting when you arrive.

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            Zingle Txt Now 4 No Lines K?

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              Zingle is so simple that even users with “dumb” phones can get in on the fun. That’s because Zingle lets users text their order via SMS to restaurants and coffee shops. The Zingle app makes it easy to find participating locations and saves your favorite orders. There’s no charge to place an order, but keep in mind that text-messaging rates may apply.

               

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                    Seamless Ordering for No Waiting

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                      If you’re in one of the 40 cities covered by Seamless, download this app. Now. Every area is different, of course, but in Long Beach, CA I found a great selection of local restaurants with reviews, ratings and menus. Another bonus with this app is you have the choice of pick-up or delivery so you can skip both the line and the traffic. Score!

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                            Use ChowNow to Skip the Line at Local Restaurants

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                              ChowNow is creating the apps that make it possible for you to cut the front of the line at your favorite burrito spot. Their tools offer local restaurants the ability to have branded apps—even without a big national marketing budget. Now, hungry people like me can order a Mac Daddy pancake from The Potholder Café, pick it up and get home to eat it while it’s still hot.

                              Tapingo Gets College Kids Out of Line

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                                The smart folks at Tapingo know that college students don’t have time to wait in line. (Toga! Toga!) They have studying to do. To help keep students on task—and on budget—the Tapingo app for Mobile Food Ordering on Campus even keeps track of payment partners like credit cards, Paypal, or student cards. The app highlights participating locations on (and nearby) a campus that accept mobile orders so students can get their orders and be on their way quickly.

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                                If your time is too valuable to wait in line, it’s time to hack your mealtime routine. From smartphones to text-only, and office lunches to campus cuisine, there are plenty of ways to get ahead of the herd by pre-ordering with your iPhone. On the other hand, if what you really need is 10 more minutes with Temple Run, then perhaps a long line is just what you’re looking for.

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                                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                                        The Terminal Archive

                                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                                        Clearing Your Tracks

                                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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