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How to Install Windows on a Mac

How to Install Windows on a Mac

MacOS is a very capable operating system. You can use a lot of productivity apps like Adobe products, Microsoft Office, MacOS’s native apps, and more. However, sometimes Windows is still needed for some tasks like business-specific apps, gaming, and other applications. A lot of people have trouble installing Windows on Mac but it really isn’t that difficult. In this tutorial we’ll show you how to install Windows on a Mac.

Step 1: Get the prerequisite tools

To run Windows, Mac uses software called Boot Camp. Macs come with Boot Camp pre-installed, which you can find if you go to Finder, then Utilities. Before you get started you should check this website and make sure your software is up to date. Older versions may contain bugs that could complicate things.

You will also need to get a hold of a Windows installation disc. This tutorial works for at least the last three versions of Windows, which are Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1. You can buy official discs from retail stores like Best Buy, or from online retailers like Newegg. If you have the software, you can also create your own install disc using this tutorial.

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Step 2: Run the Boot Camp Assistant

how to install windows on mac

    As I mentioned above, go to Finder, then Utilities, and double click the Boot Camp Assistant. It may ask you for your administrator credentials like your user name and password. Fill those in where appropriate. Then it’s a matter of following some instructions as the Assistant walks you through the early steps of the process.

    During this process you will likely be asked to Download the Windows support software for this Mac. If prompted, say yes. These are the drivers required for Windows to work properly. Downloading the drivers can take a very long time and be rather frustrating. The good news is the process will automatically put them on a CD, DVD, or flash drive for you so you don’t have to do that manually.

    Step 3: Partition your hard drive

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    how to install windows on mac

      The next step is to choose how much space you’ll give to Windows. This is determined by a slider. Grab the center and move it back and forth until you have a properly sized partition. There is no standard size for Windows although you should know that Windows 7 requires a minimum of 16GB, with Windows 8 and 8.1 taking about the same.

      There are two things to keep in mind. The space you give to Windows will be subtracted from your OSX partition. So if you have a 500GB hard drive and you give 100GB to Windows, OSX will only have 400GB remaining. It’s also important that you give Windows enough space for the applications you need. It’s better to overestimate and have extra space than underestimate and run out of space because re-partitioning hard drives can be difficult.

      Once you have selected a size, click the Partition button. It’ll take a little while for your computer to partition, so if it seems like it is taking a while, just be patient.

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      Step 4: Begin the Windows installation

      how to install windows on mac

        Place your Windows install media into your Mac and click the Install button. Your Mac will boot into the usual Windows installation screen. Follow each step. When you get to the screen where it asks which partition you want to install on, perform the following steps:

        1. Click on the BOOTCAMP partition.
        2. Click the Drive Options (advanced) button.
        3. Choose format.

        Other than that, just follow the prompts and once you’re finished, Windows will begin to install. If you have any unusual issues, check here for the in-depth steps in installing Windows.

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        Step 5: Install drivers

        how to install windows on mac

          This is not the most difficult part of the process but it is the part that has the potential to have the most problems. In this step you’ll be installing the drivers required to make your Mac work in Windows. Earlier in this process you downloaded the Windows drivers and put them on a flash drive. For this step, you should be booted into Windows.

          Insert the flash drive, open it, open the folder called Boot Camp, and double click the Setup.exe. During the install process you may see various errors and warnings. These are normal. Click to proceed through them. Once done, your drivers should work. A reboot will be required.

          Step 6: Clean up and enjoy

          At this point you should test your new installation to make sure everything works properly. If you find any issues, Apple has an FAQ on how to use Boot Camp that you can find here. At this point, when you turn your Mac on, press the Option key to choose whether you want to boot into Windows or Mac. That’s it, you’re done!

          Featured photo credit: MacMint via macmint.com

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          Joseph Hindy

          A writer, editor, and YouTuber who likes to share about technology and lifestyle tips.

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          Last Updated on May 14, 2019

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

          1. Zoho Notebook
            If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
          2. Evernote
            The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
          3. Net Notes
            If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
          4. i-Lighter
            You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
          5. Clipmarks
            For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
          6. UberNote
            If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
          7. iLeonardo
            iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
          8. Zotero
            Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

          I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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          In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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