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How to Easily Start a Website

How to Easily Start a Website

There’s a lot to take in when you’re thinking about starting a website. HTML. CSS. Templates. Metadata and analytics. Luckily, you don’t need to know how all that stuff works to get started.

All you need to know right now is the foundation of how to start a website. We can talk about fancy design tweaks and traffic boosting ideas another time, right? Maybe after you actually have a website to discuss?

These 5 straightforward steps will walk you through how to start a website without getting overloaded by all the extra options:

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Step 1: Get a Domain Name

domain name options

    Your domain name is like the online address for your website, for example Lifehack.org, BeAFreelanceBlogger.com or Example.com. A domain name (including the part after the dot) has to be unique, so you might need to come up with a few different ideas if your favourites have already been registered for another website. Once you’ve found a unique domain name that suits you, register it for an appropriate length of time and it’s yours until the registration expires.

    What should you choose for your domain name? That’s up to you. The most important thing to ask yourself is, “Is it memorable?”

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    If nobody can remember your domain name, then people aren’t likely to recommend your site by word of mouth or to find their way back to you after their first visit. So make your domain name clear, meaningful and easy to spell!

    Step 2: Get Web Hosting

    If a domain name is like the address of your website, then a web host is like a landlord who rents you the space at that address. The only difference is that you get to choose your web host independently of your domain name. Traditionally, you can’t choose an apartment and then choose your landlord, but with domain names and web hosts that’s exactly how it works.

    There are a lot of different web hosts to choose from, so do a little bit of due diligence to choose a reputable host with a package that’s a good match to your needs. Follow their instructions to update the domain name system to your new nameservers.

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    How to Easily Build Your Own Website

      Step 3: Build an Empty Site

      WordPress is one of the most popular solutions for building your own website without having to learn a lot of code. You can install it on your website pretty easily and if you want to make it even easier, choose a web host that gives you a “one-click installation” tool for WordPress.

      Once that’s installed, you can choose a theme to set the design foundations of your website, and customise elements of the theme to change specific features of your web design. This is when you have to start making choices about how you want your site to look: is it image focused or more based on writing? Is it colourful or monochrome?

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      Step 4: Add Content

      You can add almost anything to your website, with as many or as few pages as you want. What’s going to work best to get your message across: text, images, audio, video? You might want to look into WordPress plugins and widgets that help you display everything just the way you want it.

      Step 5: Test Everything

      Once you’ve published your content, go back over it and check every page, every post and every hyperlink for screw-ups. Tidy up anything that isn’t working right and then do it all over again using a different web browser. Repeat these steps until you’re pretty sure you caught any major problems.

      That’s it, you’re done. Your website is live on the internet, and it works!

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      Sophie Lizard

      A writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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      Last Updated on May 14, 2019

      8 Replacements for Google Notebook

      8 Replacements for Google Notebook

      Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

      1. Zoho Notebook
        If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
      2. Evernote
        The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
      3. Net Notes
        If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
      4. i-Lighter
        You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
      5. Clipmarks
        For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
      6. UberNote
        If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
      7. iLeonardo
        iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
      8. Zotero
        Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

      I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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      In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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