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Guy Kawasaki’s Thoughts on Online Life

Guy Kawasaki’s Thoughts on Online Life
Guy Kawasaki

    Guy Kawasaki visited Ireland to deliver his Art Of The Start talk at the Irish Software Association’s annual conference. His ‘Irished-up’ version of the talk was warmly received by a packed house. Despite his busy work and tourist schedule (this was his first visit to Ireland) Guy found time to sit down and discuss his online life, how he stays in touch with everything that is going on out there, and his new venture, Alltop.com.

    1. Hi Guy and welcome to Ireland. I can only imagine how busy you must be with all of your interests. Can you give us a sense of how you stay on top of all your online activities – how do you handle email for example?
    GK: It’s sheer determination. I spend hours every day answering email. I also have an online assistant to help me with the easy ones, but I don’t have many easy ones. I am basically attached to my Air.

    2. What about feeds? Are you a big reader and subscriber?
    GK: As the content guy behind Alltop.com, I have personally found approximately 1,200 feeds. I also read feeds for Truemors stories. I’m probably about six standard deviations from the norm when it comes to feeds!

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    3. What are the tools that you have discovered in the past couple of years that have made your online life easier, more productive or more pleasurable?
    GK: My main tools, aside from Office 2008, are MarsEdit, Ecto, Typeit4me, GrabberRaster, Yojimbo, and NetNewsWire. I have found all of these essential for my roles as a venture capitalist, blogger, and entrepreneur.

    4. With regard to your new site, Alltop.com, I suppose my first question is the obvious one – tell me about the gap you spotted that led you to develop Alltop.
    GK: We saw how popurls was sending Truemors as much traffic as Google, so we figured out that single-page aggregations are popular things. We started with Celebrities because we thought it would attract celebrity news fans. Then we added Fashion. Then Sports, Gaming, and Macintosh. And we just kept on going. Now there are more than twenty topics.

    5. I have heard some people accusing you of stealing the idea for Alltop from popurls. What do you say to that? What about Original Signals?
    GK: They should ask Thomas Marban if he feels robbed. Before we did Alltop, I asked him why he didn’t do more topics and if he cared if we did Alltop. We acknowledge popurls all over Alltop – in fact, there are two links to popurls on our home page. Do you see any links on Apple’s home page to PARC or links on Microsoft’s home page to Apple?

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    Regarding Original Signals, I didn’t even see the site until after we opened up Alltop. I didn’t know the site existed – so much for extensive competitive analysis by an entrepreneur! I saw popurls, loved it, got Thomas’s ‘permission,’ convinced my partner in Truemors (Will Mayall) to agree, contacted the developers of Truemors (Electric Pulp), and off we went.

    6. Why do you think there has been such a low takeup of RSS tools (especially readers) by web users?
    GK: I’m glad you mentioned this. In fact, this is the conceptual gap that Alltop addresses. We provide “aggregation without aggravation.” Take it from someone who knows: It isn’t easy to find the RSS feeds of many sites. I sometimes think companies literally bury them. So to really use RSS all you have to do is (1) find a site you want to read; (2) find the feed in the site; (3) know that Netvibes, Pageflakes, iGoogle, MyYahoo, NetNewsWire, etc exist and where to get them; (4) learn how to use them; (5) remember to boot a separate application or go to personal page to read your feeds. And even if you do all of this, most of the feed readers do not present articles in a clean, compact way. It’s a miracle that as many people use feeds as they do.

    Personalization is relevant for people with more time than money. Alltop is for people with more money than time. (Guy Kawasaki)

    7. Can I assemble a personalised “My AllTop” page now or will I be able to do that in the future? What plans do you have for features and tweaks on Alltop?
    GK: There’s no such thing as “My Alltop” for anyone except me. In a sense Alltop is Guy’s Alltop (he grins widely). But I know what you’re really asking: Will there be customization and personalization? The answer is a definite, “Maybe.”

    It isn’t a no-brainer to do this. The people who really want personalization can already do that with the products and sites I mentioned. I don’t want Alltop to be a better Pageflakes. I want to get the people who will never hear about or use Pageflakes. Perhaps true personalization – I mean at the Facebook / MySpace level – is relevant for people with more time than money. Alltop is for people with more money than time.

    Think of Alltop as an online magazine rack. You come to the rack, see a bunch of magazines and their stories, and you quickly scan them to see which stories you want to read. If you consistently like only a few of the magazines, then God bless you: go ‘buy a subscription’ via an RSS feed in a customized page or feed reader. If your readers really want personalization, tell them to contact me, and I’ll build an Alltop topic just for them. All it takes is money – hey, you can get a purple and yellow 911 with alligator leather seats from Porsche if you want it bad enough!

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    8. So what do you say when power users say, “I can do what Alltop does all by myself”?
    GK: Some combination of the following: “Have a nice life.” “When are you moving out of your parents’ house?” “Been on a date lately?”

    9. Is there any prospect for demographic fine-tuning on Alltop? (I am a cranky 40-something, you are a beaming 50-something; we have very different interests from 20-somethings. Do you envisage being able to break things down to the point where we can find out where all the cool 40-50 somethings are going on the web and therefore avoid/ignore the stuff we don’t find interesting?)
    GK: I see this as Mission: Impossible. It’s effectively saying that all 40 year olds are interested in the same things, and it’s different from what all 50 year olds are interested in. I find it hard to imagine that this is the case. If you’re a 40 year old who likes cars, go to autos.alltop.com. If you’re a 50 year old that likes fashion, go to fashion.alltop.com. Trying to set up topics for age groups is like trying to create Virgos.alltop.com where we supply what “all Virgos” want to read. There’s no way I can see to categorize like this.

    10. What’s your favorite Alltop topic?
    GK: Hard to say. I love all my children. Egos.alltop.com is the most controversial. No one thought we had the courage to do religion.alltop.com. Twitterati.alltop.com is a fascinating real-time slice of what interesting people are doing. Nonprofit.alltop.com has the potential to change the world the most.

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    11. Coming to the wider topic of blogging, monetizing still seems to be the holy grail for many bloggers. I was interested to note how little you made from advertising on your blog in that ‘first year of blogging’ post you did. I also noted that Businesspundit reckoned he was clearing just $1,000 a month from that revenue stream. You’re a Top 50 blogger and he’s in the Top 4,000 and while I’m fairly sure that monetizing was not a key priority for either of you; considering the kind of traffic and linkage you both get, those are some pretty small potatoes (and we know a thing or two about potatoes here in Ireland). Thoughts?
    GK: Monetizing is over-rated. If people pursued their passions only if they can make money on it, most of us would do nothing. I play ice hockey 4-5 times a week. I’ll never make a pence on it. Some people write journals – they’ll never make a pence on it. Some people play music – they’ll never make a pence on it. How many people will monetize their photography? 100,000,000 people blog. 99,999,000 will never make a pence on it. So what? Blogging is self-expression, not a way to amass a fortune. People should stop looking for grails and start looking for personal enlightenment. (When I asked him about monetizing Alltop, he just shrugged and said, “It’s pure Web 2.0 – we came up with it, we put it up and if we get eyeballs we’ll think about putting ads on it.”)

    12. I saw you in the Macheads trailer. (a) What’s you impression of the film? (b) Have you ever knowingly dated a Windows user?
    GK: I haven’t seen all of Macheads yet. So (a) I hope I’m depicted in a positive manner (he grins widely again) and (b) when I had a social life, computers were not invented yet (he grins more widely).
    Prototypo, ergo sum.
    13. What’s next for Twitter? What about the ‘slowdown’ in social networking sites – is it merger time? What will happen with Yahoo/Microsoft/Google? In other words, the big fat hairy impossible question – where’s it all going for Web 2.0?
    GK: Who knows? Not me, that’s for sure. Who cares? If you just sit around and think about what will happen, you’ll never “do” and then nothing will happen for sure. People should prototype more and cogitate less. “Prototypo, ergo sum.” I wasn’t that great a Latin student.

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    Rowan Manahan

    Rowan is a professional trainer with over 20 years’ experience mentoring and consulting with executives at all levels.

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    Last Updated on July 10, 2019

    11 Brain Training Apps to Train Your Mind and Improve Memory

    11 Brain Training Apps to Train Your Mind and Improve Memory

    Whether at work or at school, people these days are under tremendous pressure to perform, perform and perform! Stress and pressure can have adverse affects on the well-being of a person, and need to be controlled.

    Now, this doesn’t mean you make a dash to your nearest therapist. There are a number of wonderful and smart apps that you can use on your phone. These brain training apps have been scientifically designed to target specific areas of the human mind and control harmful emotions such as anxiety, as well as to improve memory and sharpness of the brain.

    Here are 11 iPhone apps that you will not only enjoy but also find useful in keeping your mental health balanced at all times.

    1. Lumosity

    This app consists of games that focus on improving the user’s memory, problem-solving capability, attention span, and thinking. There are three games in each session, and they challenge the brain by changing every time. The user has to complete the games while playing against a clock.

    Free of trial. $15 per month for the full version.

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    Luminosity Mind training apps-Lifehack

      2. Fit Brains Trainer

      This brain training app has 10 sets of games that work on different areas of the brain and improve memory as well as concentration. A user is required to finish a particular task from each category on a daily basis and the app tracks the progress by a color coded graph.

      Free.

      Fit Brains Trainer Mind training apps-Lifehack

        3. CogniFit Brain Fitness

        Developed with the help of neuroscientists, this fun app improves a person’s cognitive abilities, which includes memory and concentration. The progress made by the user over a period of time can be tracked. Users can also play challenge rounds with their friends. The app also modifies the difficulty level to suit the profile of the user and provide recommendations based on the results. Spending 20–30 minutes a few times every week can give measurable improvement in the performance of a user.

        First four games free, then $13 a month.

        cognifit-Mind Training Apps-Lifehack

          4. Brain Fitness Pro

          The makers of this app claim that it can improve the IQ of a user, and improve intelligence and memory. The app is fun and is user friendly, and 30 minutes a day can fetch you results in less than three weeks.

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          Buy for $3.99.

          5. Happify

          If nothing else makes you happy in life, this app will. Well, this is what the developers claim at least. This app comes loaded with lots of quizzes, polls and gratitude journals, which work on the fundamentals of positive psychology. The app also helps to control stress and emotions to make you feel better.

          Free to use.

          Happify-Mind Training Apps-Lifehack

            6. Clockwork Brain

            You will like the little gold robot that comes in every time to explain the next game you are going to play. While the games are not much different to those offered in apps such as Luminosity, the look and feel reminds me of a workshop from old times.

            Free.

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              7. ReliefLink

              Initially created as an app for suicide prevention, it has found its use as a great app for tracking the mood of the user by taking measure of all things relevant to the user’s mental health. In case the user experiences high emotional stress, the app has a coping mechanism that includes voice-recorded mindfulness, exercises and music for relaxation. There is also a map that informs the user of the nearest therapist and medical facilities for mental health treatment.

              Relief Link - Mind Training Apps - Lifehack

                8. Eidetic

                Eidetic is a memory enhancement app and uses a ‘spaced repetition’ technique to help users memorize information such as important phone numbers, words, credit card details or passwords. It also notifies you when it’s time to take a test to see what you remember, so that you retain information in your long-term memory.

                Eidetic - Mind Training Apps - Lifehack

                  9. Braingle

                  Braingle helps to maintain the sharpness of the brain and improve the reasoning ability of a person through riddles and optical illusions. It is different from other brain training apps that employ memory and reaction based tests. You can also compete with your friends and family members in figuring out the fun riddles.

                  Free.

                  Briangle- Mind Training Apps-LIfehack

                    10. Not The Hole Story

                    If you have a penchant for solving hard riddles, then this app is a must-have for you. Filled with exclusive riddles along with a simple-to-use interface, the app gives you riddles that you have to solve through a book. You will be given hints along the way, and when you give up, the answers will be revealed. This app will encourage you to broaden your thinking and put your mind to a challenging test.

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                    Free.

                    Not the hole story - Mind Training Apps - Lifehack

                      11. Personal Zen

                      This fun brain training app follows the journey of two animated characters who travel through a field of grass. Personal Zen is a nice app meant for reducing anxiety and trains the brain to focus on the positive aspects. The developer’s advice is to use the app for 10 minutes a day to see the best results.

                      Free.

                      personal zen- mind training apps - lifehack

                        Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

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