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Fix Your Android Problems Like A Pro

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Fix Your Android Problems Like A Pro

Does your Android smartphone hang all the time and make you feel as if you have been mugged by your device manufacturer? As a matter of fact, many Android users have publicly expressed their frustration with their malfunctioning phone and its unsatisfactory performance and awful battery issues. But the situation may not be entirely the fault of the operating system. There is no doubt that Android is heavily resource oriented and requires higher RAM than other mobile operating systems. However, there are still many ways to optimize your smartphone for better performance and fix your Android problems like a pro. Here’s how.

1. Identify your Android category

Android is an extremely capable and robust operating system, which is what has made it so popular among the smartphone manufacturers. Droids are available across many categories, such as low end, medium end and high end. Naturally the low-end phones won’t be able to compete with high-end phones in terms of performance, but their optimization levels are different.

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  • Low-end Android. Processor < 1GHz; RAM < 512MB. Requires higher maintenance for better performance. Examples: Samsung Galaxy Ace, HTC Touch.
  • Medium-end Android. Processor < 1GHz Dual core; RAM < 1GB. Requires moderate maintenance for optimal performance. Examples: Samsung Galaxy S Advance, HTC Desire.
  • High-end Android. Processor > 1GHz Quad core; RAM > 1GB. Needs minimal or no maintenance at all. Examples: Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC One V or Sony Xperia Z2.

S advance  S5

    2. Stay on top of application launch delays and unusual phone lag

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    Fix Your Android Problems- LifeHack
      • Clean the cache and temporary memory using something like All-In-One Toolbox or Clean Master.
      • Explore the developer options available on Android ICS and above. Limit background processes and do not keep unnecessary activities running (for low-end droid users and those who can work without multitasking).
      • Choose between performance or looks. Minimize window animation, transition and animator scales, besides toggling between hardware overlays. Whatever works best for your device.
      • Disable unwanted system applications. Open the application manager and disable unwanted system apps that came pre-installed in the stock phone. For low-end and medium-end Android users, unwanted mobile applications don’t exactly help with the phone’s performance or the battery power consumption either.
      • Let your processor breathe. Remove recent applications that may not be required anymore but that are bugging your RAM.
      • Everybody loves mobile apps. The more the better! But same cannot be said for your smartphone. More apps mean more memory and resource dispersion, which ultimately triggers unwanted launch delays and lag. Hence, it is advisable to be a little selective about the kind, size and, most importantly, the purpose of mobile applications in your phone, especially if you own a low- or medium-end Android device.

      Developer options - Fix Your Android Problems- LifeHack

        3. Save on battery juice

        Modern smartphones usually last a day on a single battery recharge, especially Android phones. Battery juice can be saved with the following tricks and tools. I hope they help your case!

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        • Use battery-saving apps. Juice Defender and Easy Battery Saver are some of the most popular Android applications available on the Google Play Store.
        • Go dark over screen. Use a dark-themed wallpaper because it helps in conserving battery juice. This works brilliantly in the case of Android smartphones with super Amoled or Black IPS screens, such as Galaxy S4 and S5.
        • Power Saving. Stock Jelly Bean phones come with three battery-saving settings: CPU power saving, screen power saving, and turn off haptic feedback. Check them when you feel you need to save some juice before the zero power catastrophe.
        • Modern li-ion batteries don’t have memory. Stop plugging your phone in to charge before going to sleep if you want to keep your battery for a long time. Li-ion batteries aren’t like their nickel counterparts, and prolonging their charging cycles can destroy their lifespan.
        • Calibrate your battery. Experts have opined that it is a good idea to calibrate (completely drain out) your battery at least once a month to enhance its life. Calibration takes care of your battery’s health and charge cycles.

        Fix Your Android Problems- LifeHack

          Featured photo credit: Fried Toast via flickr.com

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          Utkarsh Sahu

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          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

            What Does Private Browsing Do?

            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

            The Terminal Archive

            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

            Clearing Your Tracks

            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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            dscacheutil -flushcache

            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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