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Five Reasons to Choose an Android Tablet Over an iPad

Five Reasons to Choose an Android Tablet Over an iPad

    An early technology adopter, I purchased the iPad on the first day it came out.  I also got the original iPhone on the day it came out, and the first Google Android phone, the T-Mobile G1, within a month of its release.  Google even sent me their first unlocked Android phone, the Nexus One, to review when it came out. I like new toys and am not tied to any specific company; the one with the coolest or best features is the one that wins me over.

    Unfortunately, my iPad was stolen less than a month after I bought it.  Insurance covered the loss, but I did not rush out to buy a new one right away.  I got my chance to play with the iPad and while it was pretty cool, I found it to be more of an entertainment device than anything and it was lacking some key features – for example, a camera.  Apple will probably add some of those features with the upcoming release of the iPad 2, which some say is to be announced this week, but I’m sick of their game of intentionally leaving out features that consumers want and introducing it on a subsequent version so you’ll buy their product again. I want all the features I want right now.  Sure, I’ll probably buy another similar device in a year or two, but by that point I expected the features to once again be something new and cutting edge, not a feature that you opted not to include but most others did.

    I am still in the market for a new tablet, and it’s a great time to be ready to acquire one.  The 2011 Consumer Electronics Show last month was dominated by a slew of tablets, the new must-have device.  Tablet computers have been around for some time, but they were never as sleek, pretty, functional, and in-demand as they are now.  The launch of the iPad last year can be credited with bringing the tablet mainstream, but one year later you’ve got a whole lot more choice.

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    The top competitor for the Apple iPad right now is any one of a number of Google Android-powered devices manufactured by the likes, of Motorola, Samsung, Dell and others.  HP Palm announced a new webOS powered tablet yesterday, but I think they still be a minor player in the -tablet arena.  I’ve done my research and played with a few of the new Android tablets and at this point have decided that an Android tablet is a better choice than the iPad.  Here are my top five reasons to choose an Android tablet over an iPad:

      Dell Streak 7. Photo courtesy of Dell.

      1. Choice of Size

      The Apple iPad is closest in size to a 10×8 picture frame with its dimensions at 9.56 x 7.47 x .5 in.  There are no other size options for the iPad, unless you’re of the opinion that the iPad is merely a giant iPhone, and in that case the iPhone could count as a smaller version.

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      Unlike the iPad, the various Android tablets come in a range of sizes.  The sizes include 5-in. (Dell, Acer), 7-in. (Dell, Samsung, Acer), 9-in. (LG, Panidigital), and 10-in. (Motorola Xoom, Acer) tablets.  The 5-inch tablets are admittedly just slightly larger than popular touchscreen smartphones, which tend to top out in the 4-inch range. But if they make them, there’s obviously some kind of market for them. You can go bigger or smaller than the iPad with an Android. Personally, I’d like to go bigger and would love to see an 11-inch tablet come out in the near future.  It’d be the exact size of a piece of paper.

      2. True Multitasking

      Apple has avoided true multitasking on the iPad primarily due to battery life and performance concerns, the reason they always leave off features on their new iPhones as well.

      There are already some Android tablets running off dual-core processors, which have more than enough power to handle true multitasking.  Android 3.0’s new multitasking panel is also easy to bring up with a single tap on the screen, and provides full previews of running applications.  The multitasking panel is also extremely easy to navigate.

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      Apple should have figured out how to deliver true multitasking.  Perhaps this will be a feature included in the second-generation iPad.

      3. Cameras

      Apple made a huge mistake in not including a camera on the iPad.  At the very least it should have included and outward facing camera, but if it really wanted to be a winner, it would have also had a second, front-facing camera that users could use for video chatting.

      Most Android tablets have 2 cameras, an outward facing one and a inward one for video chatting.  Google’s native camera app also has some nice features that will let you alter your image, without having to download and edit it on your computer.

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        Apple iPad. Photo courtesy of Apple Inc.

        4. No Syncing Required

        Whether you own an iPod, iPhone, or an iPad, you must sync the device with iTunes using a computer to transfer downloads purchased on your computer to the device.  It’s a royal pain, but it’s Apple’s way of keeping their users coming back to iTunes.  It’s also a very slow process.

        With the Android Market Web Store, you can buy apps on your computer and send them to your device without syncing. Brilliant!

        5. Replaceable Batteries

        One of the things that irked me most about the iPhone and the iPad was the battery.  It’s not removable, and if it goes, you have to get a whole new device.  If yours breaks and still happens to be under warranty, Apple will send you a new one — for a fee.  For the iPad, if the battery goes, you can send in your old one and they’ll send you a new one for $99.   Oh, and make sure you synced it before it died because when they send you out the new one it won’t have any of your apps or personal information on it.  If you forgot to sync, you’re S.O.L.

        Android devices have their own batteries which are replaceable.  If the battery goes, you just buy a new one.  Or if you’re under warranty, the manufacturer can send you a new one without having to bother with taking your entire tablet.

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        Last Updated on February 15, 2019

        7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

        7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

        Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

        Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

        Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

        So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

        Joe’s Goals

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          Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

          Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

          Daytum

            Daytum

            is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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            Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

            Excel or Numbers

              If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

              What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

              Evernote

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                I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                Access or Bento

                  If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                  Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                  You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                  Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                  All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                  Conclusion

                  I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                  What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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