Advertising

Five Reasons to Choose an Android Tablet Over an iPad

Advertising
Five Reasons to Choose an Android Tablet Over an iPad

    An early technology adopter, I purchased the iPad on the first day it came out.  I also got the original iPhone on the day it came out, and the first Google Android phone, the T-Mobile G1, within a month of its release.  Google even sent me their first unlocked Android phone, the Nexus One, to review when it came out. I like new toys and am not tied to any specific company; the one with the coolest or best features is the one that wins me over.

    Unfortunately, my iPad was stolen less than a month after I bought it.  Insurance covered the loss, but I did not rush out to buy a new one right away.  I got my chance to play with the iPad and while it was pretty cool, I found it to be more of an entertainment device than anything and it was lacking some key features – for example, a camera.  Apple will probably add some of those features with the upcoming release of the iPad 2, which some say is to be announced this week, but I’m sick of their game of intentionally leaving out features that consumers want and introducing it on a subsequent version so you’ll buy their product again. I want all the features I want right now.  Sure, I’ll probably buy another similar device in a year or two, but by that point I expected the features to once again be something new and cutting edge, not a feature that you opted not to include but most others did.

    I am still in the market for a new tablet, and it’s a great time to be ready to acquire one.  The 2011 Consumer Electronics Show last month was dominated by a slew of tablets, the new must-have device.  Tablet computers have been around for some time, but they were never as sleek, pretty, functional, and in-demand as they are now.  The launch of the iPad last year can be credited with bringing the tablet mainstream, but one year later you’ve got a whole lot more choice.

    Advertising

    The top competitor for the Apple iPad right now is any one of a number of Google Android-powered devices manufactured by the likes, of Motorola, Samsung, Dell and others.  HP Palm announced a new webOS powered tablet yesterday, but I think they still be a minor player in the -tablet arena.  I’ve done my research and played with a few of the new Android tablets and at this point have decided that an Android tablet is a better choice than the iPad.  Here are my top five reasons to choose an Android tablet over an iPad:

      Dell Streak 7. Photo courtesy of Dell.

      1. Choice of Size

      The Apple iPad is closest in size to a 10×8 picture frame with its dimensions at 9.56 x 7.47 x .5 in.  There are no other size options for the iPad, unless you’re of the opinion that the iPad is merely a giant iPhone, and in that case the iPhone could count as a smaller version.

      Advertising

      Unlike the iPad, the various Android tablets come in a range of sizes.  The sizes include 5-in. (Dell, Acer), 7-in. (Dell, Samsung, Acer), 9-in. (LG, Panidigital), and 10-in. (Motorola Xoom, Acer) tablets.  The 5-inch tablets are admittedly just slightly larger than popular touchscreen smartphones, which tend to top out in the 4-inch range. But if they make them, there’s obviously some kind of market for them. You can go bigger or smaller than the iPad with an Android. Personally, I’d like to go bigger and would love to see an 11-inch tablet come out in the near future.  It’d be the exact size of a piece of paper.

      2. True Multitasking

      Apple has avoided true multitasking on the iPad primarily due to battery life and performance concerns, the reason they always leave off features on their new iPhones as well.

      There are already some Android tablets running off dual-core processors, which have more than enough power to handle true multitasking.  Android 3.0’s new multitasking panel is also easy to bring up with a single tap on the screen, and provides full previews of running applications.  The multitasking panel is also extremely easy to navigate.

      Advertising

      Apple should have figured out how to deliver true multitasking.  Perhaps this will be a feature included in the second-generation iPad.

      3. Cameras

      Apple made a huge mistake in not including a camera on the iPad.  At the very least it should have included and outward facing camera, but if it really wanted to be a winner, it would have also had a second, front-facing camera that users could use for video chatting.

      Most Android tablets have 2 cameras, an outward facing one and a inward one for video chatting.  Google’s native camera app also has some nice features that will let you alter your image, without having to download and edit it on your computer.

      Advertising

        Apple iPad. Photo courtesy of Apple Inc.

        4. No Syncing Required

        Whether you own an iPod, iPhone, or an iPad, you must sync the device with iTunes using a computer to transfer downloads purchased on your computer to the device.  It’s a royal pain, but it’s Apple’s way of keeping their users coming back to iTunes.  It’s also a very slow process.

        With the Android Market Web Store, you can buy apps on your computer and send them to your device without syncing. Brilliant!

        5. Replaceable Batteries

        Advertising

        One of the things that irked me most about the iPhone and the iPad was the battery.  It’s not removable, and if it goes, you have to get a whole new device.  If yours breaks and still happens to be under warranty, Apple will send you a new one — for a fee.  For the iPad, if the battery goes, you can send in your old one and they’ll send you a new one for $99.   Oh, and make sure you synced it before it died because when they send you out the new one it won’t have any of your apps or personal information on it.  If you forgot to sync, you’re S.O.L.

        Android devices have their own batteries which are replaceable.  If the battery goes, you just buy a new one.  Or if you’re under warranty, the manufacturer can send you a new one without having to bother with taking your entire tablet.

        More by this author

        Julie McCormick

        Julie McCormick is a writer, and co-owner of The Cleveland Leader, a Technorati Top 1000 site.

        How to Improve Memory and Boost Your Brain Power How to Declutter Your Life and Reduce Stress (The Ultimate Guide) How to Continue Reading the New York Times Online For Free How to Get Around Facebook’s New Photo Viewer 7 Ways to Create a More Tranquil Workspace

        Trending in Technology

        1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

        Read Next

        Advertising
        Advertising

        Last Updated on November 25, 2021

        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

        Advertising
        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

        There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

        Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

          What Does Private Browsing Do?

          When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

          For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

          Advertising

          The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

          The Terminal Archive

          While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

          Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

          dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

          Advertising

          Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

          Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

          However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

          Clearing Your Tracks

          Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

          Advertising

          dscacheutil -flushcache

          As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

          Other Browsers and Private Browsing

          Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

          If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

          Advertising

          As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

          Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

          Read Next