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Dr. Cleaner: A Great App To Speed Up Your Mac

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Dr. Cleaner: A Great App To Speed Up Your Mac

Own a Mac and ever wished that you could speed it up with maybe just a simple, easy and uncomplicated mouse click? Well, that is exactly what Dr. Cleaner could do for your Mac.

Available for a free download on the iTunes store, with several great reviews, Dr. Cleaner gives your Mac a performance boost by freeing up plenty of disk space and by also clearing up your Mac’s memory, two vital processes that can affect your system performance.

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Here’s a quick overview on how Dr. Cleaner works to get your Mac running faster than before.

Disk Clean

dr. cleaner disk clean up

    • Purges useless cache files that typically build up over time
    • Empties out temporary download locations
    • Deletes browser cache and unnecessary files related to iTunes downloads
    • Cleans out your trash (files in trash are otherwise still using disk space!)
    • Completely removes all traces of an app that you want to uninstall

    Memory Optimizer

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    dr. cleaner memory cleanup
      • Purges unused memory and makes it available to your Mac’s processor
      • Frees up unnecessary memory used by recent files that you are done with
      • Gives you an easy memory monitoring app to analyze your Mac’s memory usage

      While advanced Mac users who run routine maintenance on their Mac’s will not find Dr. Cleaner doing anything revolutionary, amateur Mac owners will definitely benefit from giving it a quick run. Dr. Cleaner can be particularly useful for those who do not have any idea about how to delete junk like cache files, system files, log files and binary junk off their Mac.

      Dr. Cleaner, available for a free download at iTunes, is only designed to delete files that will not affect your OS’s native functioning. It will also not delete your personal data automatically. As for memory cleanup, the program is intuitive enough to only free up that memory that you don’t use anymore.

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      For instance, when you finish watching a movie and close the movie app on your Mac, remnants of that program will still continue to use your Mac’s memory for a period of time. Dr. Cleaner will free up such redundantly used memory.

      On iTunes, Dr. Cleaner has over 1,000 ratings, with an average of 4.5 stars out of five, which is very impressive. Mac users from around the world have lauded it for its simplicity and efficiency, often citing that it is a quick one step solution for speeding up a Mac that might have slowed down unusually.

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      While Dr. Cleaner can provide quick and easy speedups for your Mac, more troubling performance issues could warrant slightly more elaborate fixes, as described in this very detailed 21 step Mac speed up and clean up  guide on the net.

      Featured photo credit: http://learn-share.net/ via learn-share.net

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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