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The Clever Way to Get Excellent Results

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The Clever Way to Get Excellent Results

I’ve donated more money to the driving range than I’d like to admit.

You see, growing up I was told in order to improve or perform something at a high level, the best thing to do was practice. In the context of aspiring to break triple digits on the links, I thought hitting the range and swinging until my hands bleed was the right approach. Sigh.

The distinct memory of those blisters isn’t why I now cringe at that approach. I cringe because I realize I could have used my time much more effectively. When you want to get results faster than you can teach yourself, the best thing to do is seek advice from an expert. In the instance above, I should have taken a lesson with a golf-pro. Would this have required an up-front investment? Absolutely, but by calibrating my practice with their insight and instruction, I would have saved myself hours of time, enjoyed the fruits of improvement earlier, and maybe even spent less money in the long run.

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This notion of expediting results by calling upon experts applies to anything. We can teach ourselves anything, but in order to get results at the fastest pace, we must call upon those who have keen insight into how to achieve them effectively.

Your personal network is a great first place to begin your search for an expert: it’s amazing how many people we already know and trust can help us achieve our goals. But where do you go once you’ve exhausted your network? What happens when your family and friends have never accomplished what you’ve set out to achieve?

Enter a novel new service called Clarity.fm. Clarity provides direct access to a network of over 9,000 battle-tested entrepreneurs and experts who make themselves available for phone calls to provide advice. Whether we’re talking about legal advice, content marketing, or raising capital, site members have the ability to request a phone call with a host of impressive experts who’ve gone before them.

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Clarity.fm

    If you’re after fast results, Clarity might just be your answer. Think about it—you could spend an entire day reading about how to get your company covered in a popular publication. Taking this approach can be attractive because you wouldn’t have to pay anything, but all that dithering can come at a pretty high opportunity cost.

    An alternative approach is to find someone who’s accomplished exactly what you’ve set out to achieve, not only to gain an understanding of how they’ve done it, but also how to approach it in your own scenario.  From an efficiency standpoint, there’s no question the latter appears to be the optimal strategy.

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    Clarity.fm

       

      I recently caught up with Omar Baig, Founder and CEO of Physician Nexus, who frequently calls upon Clarity to grow his business. This is what he said about the service:

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      “What Clarity is doing is leapfrogging the learning process. Nothing I’ve come across in terms of how to learn to accomplish something quickly and effectively compares to clarity. It removes all friction from getting the knowledge and feedback you’re looking for”

      I never really thought about how much friction there is to receiving expert advice outside your network until Omar brought this to my attention.

      Think about how you’d try to connect with a top expert outside your network today. You might approach this by going a conference or event where you knew they would be speaking, but there’s a great deal of friction here: you’d have to spend time traveling; it’s uncertain whether this person’s talk is going to be relevant to you; there will likely be 10 people vying for their attention following their presentation, which makes getting their direct insight within the context of your situation challenging. Seems like a lot of uncertainty for that much effort.

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      What about trying to engage experts through online networking like twitter or blog comments? If you’re targeting a busy person, it might require weeks if not months of relationship building before you can convince someone to carve out time to connect directly with you. The fastest way to learn and enhance your performance with anything is to leverage the knowledge and experience of experts. Your personal network and Clarity.fm are two great places to start.

      Where other resources do you use to find expert advice?

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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