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Ask the Entrepreneurs: 6 Pieces of Online Software That Your Tech Team Will Benefit From Using

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Ask the Entrepreneurs: 6 Pieces of Online Software That Your Tech Team Will Benefit From Using

Ask The Entrepreneurs is a regular series where members of the Young Entrepreneur Council are asked a single question that aims to help Lifehack readers level up their own lives, whether in a area of management, communication, business or life in general.

Here’s the question posed in this edition of Ask The Entrepreneurs:

“What online software has your technology team benefited from the most in order to track and fix bugs, errors, and other web based issues?”

1. MantisBT

Andrew Schrage

    MantisBT is free software that works on a variety of databases including MySQL, PostgreSQL, and MS SQL, and also works with just about any web browser. It improves project efficiency, is simple to install and administer, and is easy for end-users to work with also.

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    Andrew Schrage, Money Crashers Personal Finance

    2. GitHub

    Peter Baumgartner

      We’re huge fans of GitHub. It is the central repository for all our code and gives everyone an easy place to view and comment on each others code. Its “pull requests” feature has dramatically changed our development process for the better. It lets us easily do code reviews and spot checks on tough code without having to implement a formal review procedure.

      Peter Baumgartner, Lincoln Loop

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      3. JIRA

      Robert Castaneda

        Atlassian JIRA hands down, it lets us track all of this, but also has the ability to scale up to thousands of users and run locally if ever we need that. Also, it is used by tens of thousands of enterprise companies which means that many of our target customer base also use the software and we don’t have to give them another web 2.0 technology to sign up to.

        Robert Castaneda, ServiceRocket

        4. Pivotal Tracker

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        Brandon Wu

          With a small team juggling multiple projects, we need a tool that allows us to be fast and adaptable. We love Pivotal Tracker for it’s extremely responsive control and an UI that gives us a quick overview of the project.

          Brandon Wu, Studio Pepwuper

           

          5. Consider UserVoice

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          doreen-bloch

            UserVoice is a phenomenal plug-in widget for websites to collect user feedback in real-time and track the progress of addressing users’ concerns. While UserVoice’s tools don’t enable code-commits, they have tools in the app that enable an Admin to escalate user feedback as a bug and track the progress of these tickets. I highly recommend checking out UserVoice’s tools for easy-to-use bug tracking.

            Doreen Bloch, Poshly Inc.

            6. HipChat

            Michael Mayernick

              When an issue requires collaborative debugging, nothing is better than HipChat. There, several team members can work through ideas on the problem, post code snippets and share screenshots in a live chat. Best of all, each chat is saved and searchable, so other team members can look back at the full conversation anytime.

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              Michael Mayernick, Spinnakr

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              Last Updated on November 25, 2021

              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

              There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

              Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                What Does Private Browsing Do?

                When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                The Terminal Archive

                While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                Clearing Your Tracks

                Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                dscacheutil -flushcache

                As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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