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aNobii – Share, Track & Buy Books

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aNobii – Share, Track & Buy Books

“Print Is Dead” – Egon

    A few years ago I tried out an online book cataloguing site called LibraryThing. It’s still going strong, with an excellent community of readers contributing.

    aNobii is a newcomer, a clear rival to LibraryThing. It’s feature full and doesn’t come up short in any way. While LibraryThing has most of the same features as aNobii, it doesn’t look nearly as good.

    Aesthetics aside, aNobii isn’t missing anything. In fact, I don’t think there is any imaginable feature they have left out.

    Before anything, after a quick registration, you select your language. This leads me to believe aNobbi is a little large than it’s letting on. However, the English readership here is quite large.

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    Add the books you own, either by title or ISBN. I was able to import my book list from my LibraryThing account, but you can also use an excel spreadsheet or a list from anywhere [a blog for example], however I can’t vouch for it’s accuracy.

    Now that your books are on your ‘shelf’ you can start having some fun. First off checking the status of each title; finished, reading, not started or reference.

    Reference is an interesting feature. This obviously means you have the book on hand to gather information when required. However, a handy tool within aNobii is the ability to add Margin Notes. Each note can be asigned to any page of the book. This is very useful for reference material.

    Along with, what I would call the standard, rating and tagging for each book, there is a feature that sets aNobii apart from it’s competitors.

    Community

    For each title you can specify if it’s tradable or not. For every book you are willing to trade you can set a price or a note to a willing participant. This is a feature that sites like LibraryThing outsource to a 3rd party.

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    If you’re like me you lend books out a little too much. aNobii have a Lending section for each book that lets you add the person who you’ve lent the title to – if it’s a friend on aNobii they show up automatically.

    Tell it when you lent the book and when you want it back. Now set a reminder, if you like, and enter the borrower’s email. No more rogue novels!

      Friends

      Since we’re looking at a community of bookworms, you want to find likeminded bookworms, right? This is easy.

      aNobii will automatically select users who have similar ‘shelves’ as you. You can distinguish how similar their shelves have to be in the settings section. When you find a person with books you like, you can keep track of their shelf onsite, via RSS or even by an email.

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      With a growing database of users, and the ability to specify what location you’re in, making friends to swap books with will be a breeze.

      While browsing books, you can add titles to your wishlist, hopefully attracting others to offer swaps.

        Discussion

        Each book’s page will have descriptions and comments. A voting system keeps only the most useful or interesting comments at the top. Make new ones for each of your books, they will show up at the book’s page with your rating.

        You can start a discussion on aNobii’s forum directly from a book or message a user directly. Check out it’s Amazon info page or Google Books. See what other users have the same book or check more from the author.

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        Buying

        At the bottom of each book’s page is a list of Amazon stores and the book’s price from each. From Japan or the States, which is cheaper? You can even set your currency and which stores you want to show up.

          aNobii is just about perfection when it comes to an online library. It comes out in the details, and after a quick look over you’ll see what I mean.

          While there’s always room for improvement, aNobii provides as much of a community library where you can realistically keep track of your collection – privately or publically – as you’ll find anywhere.

          LibraryThing has the following, being an one of the first in it’s field. However, aNobii does everything right, and is looking good.

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          Create, share & explore booklists – [aNobii]

          More by this author

          Craig Childs

          Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

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          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

            What Does Private Browsing Do?

            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

            The Terminal Archive

            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

            Clearing Your Tracks

            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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            dscacheutil -flushcache

            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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