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7 WARNING Signs You’re Addicted to Technology

7 WARNING Signs You’re Addicted to Technology

Wasted Hours:

Today, it is virtually impossible to live without the aid of some form of technology. This sad truth makes technology extremely difficult to escape; because work, school, and play can all involve computers, the sense of “normal” computer usage levels becomes more intense each year. In 2009, the average person aged 8-18 spent more than seven-and-a-half hours a day involved with non-school-related technology.# Continuing to increase your time spent on computer and internet activities is the first warning sign that you’re addicted to technology.

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    Ringxiety:

    Has it happened to you? You think you hear your phone ringing or even feel it vibrating in your pocket, but it isn’t. Phantom rings are the psychological equivalent of Pavlov’s dogs—who salivated at the ringing of a bell—and usually occur when you’re expecting an “important” call or text. This troubling side-effect stems from frequent, compulsive phone or social media checkups as well as never leaving your device far from arm’s reach. Try leaving your phone on silent (or even OFF!) for extended periods of time, especially when sleeping.

    Cravings:

    The word ‘addiction’ has become clichéd, but if you feel distressed, anxious, or painfully isolated when separated from technology, you may be suffering from withdrawal. Constant bright screens and instant-gratification games wire the brain to demand a certain level of stimulation, but what happens when the power goes out? Do you panic? Do you attempt fruitlessly to login to Facebook and update your status (if you have a “smart” phone, you can do it anyway, until the battery dies…)? Cravings are a definite sign that you are abusing technology, but luckily the large majority of people give up their own addictions.# Set aside time for alternative activities, pursuing your life goals, and obtaining real-world experience.

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    Multitasking:

    Using multiple forms of media at the same time—such as playing computer games while watching TV or browsing the internet while listening to music—is linked to symptoms of anxiety and depression.# Researchers aren’t sure if multitasking causes depression and anxiety or if multitasking is a way for depressed or anxious people to distract themselves, but in the last decade, the amount of time spent multitasking with media increased 120 percent. Separate your devices; appreciate and focus on one thing at a time.

    You Don’t Know What You’re Missing:

    Technology addicts tend to lose confidence and interest in the real world, passively choosing the comfort and reassurance of a safer alternative (World of Warcraft, Facebook, Netflix). The lack of control (and a need for artificial control) consumes the meaning of family, friendships, and other pleasurable activities. Remember: TV shows, movies, and video games will always be there, but you, your friends, and your family will not.

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    Monitor Tan:

    If you’ve been binging on Battlestar Galactica or Elder Scrolls, the effects are obvious—especially in summer months. Paleness and mood variations due to lack of sunlight, as well as other physical changes such as weight gain or loss, backaches, slouching, headaches, or carpal tunnel syndrome, are direct results of technology overuse.# If you experience a change in sleep patterns—i.e. becoming nocturnal—you risk disrupting your biological clock. Take a long look in the mirror and ask, “Is this who I want to be?”

    Relapse:

    Continuing a destructive behavior despite serious external or internal consequences (such as losing a job or continually feeling detached or depressed) is the final sign of technology addiction.# Feeling guilty, ashamed, or anxious as a result of your technology habits is a bittersweet sign that some part of you has come to a reckoning that a change must happen. Relapse is common to all addictions and should have no guilt or shame attached to it. If you’ve gotten this far, you are ready for the next step: freedom from your addiction.

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    Published on September 17, 2020

    10 Best Monitors for Your PC Under $100

    10 Best Monitors for Your PC Under $100

    Are you looking for the best monitor under $100?

    Whether you want it for your home office, editing photography, or gaming, you don’t need to spend big bucks on a display screen because a low budget one will certainly do the trick.[1]

    We can almost hear you having second thoughts about the picture quality, but you don’t have to worry at all.[2]

    Our list of the best monitors under $100 will be more than enough to cover you. Just go through it now, and you’ll find yourself a bargain.

    Why You Should Trust Us

    Our list incorporates some of the best low-budget monitors available in the market. Their efficiency and distinctive traits enable them to stand out from others.[3] The hand-picked ones below are incredibly slick and have a high refresh rate, fast response time, high resolution, and built-in speakers.

    1. Acer Ultra Thin Frame Monitor

      Our first affordable computer screen is Acer’s 21.5-inch ultra-thin frame monitor. It has a refresh rate of 75Hz using an HDMI port and offers a full HD widescreen display.

      Its brightness can be maxed out at 250 nits. It has a slight tilt angle ranging from -5 to 15, as well as Radeon free sync technology.

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      Buy this computer monitor.

      2. Sceptre Ultra-Thin Display

        Sceptre is another company that provides excellent displays for your CPU. The screen size is a little smaller at 20 inches, but it’s made up for the slightly lower price than Acer. It also comes with two HDMI ports and built-in speakers and is wall mount ready.

        Buy this computer monitor.

        3. ViewSonic LED Monitor

        best monitor

          If you want the best monitor to set up in your office or around the house, ViewSonic’s LED screen is another good option to buy. The resolution is full HD and has a broader tilt ranging from -5 to 23 degrees.

          On top of that, the product comes with a 3-year warranty. Included in the bundle are a VGA cable, monitor, power cable, and audio cable.

          Buy this computer monitor.

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          4. ViewSonic Gaming Screen

            While we just covered a ViewSonic monitor, this one is specifically built for gaming in mind.

            Overall, this computer screen provides the same specs as the previously mentioned item. The key differences are that this one is slightly longer, comes with pre-set customizable visual modes, and offers a maxed out contrast, delivering a dynamic contrast ratio for sharp and crisp images. It also comes with a DVI cable.

            Buy this computer monitor.

            5. Asus Back Lit Monitor

            best monitor

              If you don’t mind spending a little more money, you can get an Asus Back Lit Monitor for your PC. A lot of the focus is on image quality, particularly having a strong contrast ratio and smart video technology for straight viewing. That feature also helps in reducing blue light since you’ll have more flexibility with the colors and brightness.

              Buy this computer monitor.

              6. Asus Back Lit Display

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                Another alternative to the previous Asus monitor is this one. It has a smaller contrast ratio, though it still delivers a smooth video display. You also have aspect controls, so you can adjust its display.

                Buy this computer monitor.

                7. Dell Ultrasharp Panel Monitor

                best monitor

                  If you’re looking for the basic features, look no further than Dell. There’s nothing particularly fancy about this panel screen, but it does the job well for any computer.

                  Its response time is 8ms, which is typical for a monitor. It can come in either silver or black.

                  Buy this computer monitor.

                  8. ViewSonic Frameless Monitor

                    If you liked ViewSonic’s LED monitor but wanted a little more features, we suggest looking at their frameless display. While it boasts similar specs as the brand’s other monitors, it offers color correction and dual built-in speakers, making it ideal for office and home use. It’s also 22 inches long.

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                    Buy this computer monitor.

                    9. Dell Mountable LED-Lit Monitor

                      For a dependable display with a good frame rate, Dell has a mountable, LED-lit monitor in the market. It measures 18.5 inches, has an adjustable arm, and has been through rigorous testing for long-lasting reliability. You can’t go wrong with this best monitor either.

                      Buy this computer monitor.

                      10. Sceptre Monitor

                        The final screen to cover comes from Sceptre. Compared to the ultra-thin version mentioned above, this one is available in 22 inches. Beyond that, it’s your standard display that provides decent tilting at -5 to 15 degrees, wall-mounted capabilities, 5ms response time, and built-in speakers.

                        Buy this computer monitor.

                        Final Thoughts

                        Finding one of the best monitors around can be tricky. If you’re looking for an affordable one that can last for years, consider picking a computer screen from this list.

                        Featured photo credit: Sebastian Bednarek via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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