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7 Advantages You Probably Don’t Know About Switching To Mac From PC

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7 Advantages You Probably Don’t Know About Switching To Mac From PC

The idea of switching to a Mac computer after being a PC user is a common temptation, but many folks haven’t made the jump because either it costs too much or there is too much invested in a PC system. Other folks believe they would have to recreate all their files, recreating tons of data in a different format. With today’s technology that challenge is a bit of myth now, but it’s still enough to hold people back. However, here are some interesting reasons why a switch might be a really good idea.

1. The Operating System Got a Lot Better

OS X for Apple was a gamechanger. Prior to that point, the operating system didn’t really work with any other system and wasn’t meant to. Whether it was Linux or PC, the Apple OS was simply incompatible territory. Then OS X came out and suddenly Apple computers became professional machines instead of hobbyist packages.

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2. The Mac Mini

The release of the Mini revolutionized the desk space. No longer was there this clunky processor unit taking up a fourth of the desk. This Mini thing instead appeared and worked just fine with everything plugged into it. It worked, it was functional, and it was dependable. Not to mention, people started realizing the Mac was a far safer computer to work with. The big bad world of the Internet generally wrote viruses for PC computers, not Apple.

3. Apples Don’t Need Drivers

Say what? For anyone who has had to fuss with Windows or re-installing that software, drivers are the bread and butter of the package. When the wrong drivers are present, bad things happen. So it can be a guessing game and a pain to get things working again correctly. With an Apple, however, there’s no need for drivers because an Apple computer had its software built into the hardware. Ergo, there’s no need to keep fussing with drivers and updates.

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4. Cost

You Get What You Pay For – Yes, Apple computers cost more, but they don’t drop to $10 in value a few years later. Instead, Apple computers keep quite a bit of their value and people still want them used. This is because they are simply built better with quality materials. Instead of a plastic case, they have an aluminum one. Instead of cheap circuitry, their computers are built to withstand use and keep going. Instead of feeling like one is carrying a suitcase, Apple laptops are built for comfort and low weight demands. When you add up all these factors, the cost doesn’t seem so expensive for what one is getting in a computer. It’s a bit like comparing an economy car from Ford versus a mid-line Toyota.

5. Portability

With the Apple system flowing back and forth between the Mac, the iPhone, and the iPad, a user’s portability of information is at a maximum. Apple set the standard for smart devices, and while there are competitors, Apple devices are still sought after as the best version on the market. And they don’t have a problem with hacks and virus sharing, at least not near as bad as PC systems do.

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6. Great Sleep Mode

Someone must have sold their soul to someone who lives in a hot place. Apple computers are amazing at how easy it is to put them into sleep mode and then return from suspense almost instantly. Try doing that with a PC and things start to go weird after a few months. At first, Windows 7 does the job correctly, but over time, the system glitches and hangs. For whatever reason, Microsoft just can’t seem to get a simple hibernation feature design correctly that stays stable in use.

7. (This is Painful) Windows Runs Better on Apple

To add insult to injury, Windows OS runs better on an Apple computer than a PC. The glitches go away and the system runs with a far smoother performance. Every since OS X was created, allowing Apple users to use PC programs on a Mac, the world changed and expanded for Apple users. PC users still sat in the same place as before.

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Macs are not the end-all, be-all for computing, but they do have significant advantages to a PC computer. When one actually has some time to work with one for a test drive, the benefits and amenities start to become apparent. Everyone’s needs are different, so really the best way to compare is to experience the difference personally.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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