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5 Strategies for Marketing Your Foreign Language Ecommerce Website

5 Strategies for Marketing Your Foreign Language Ecommerce Website

    In my last two articles for Lifehack, I looked at why small ecommerce businesses should embrace the foreign language internet, and the tricks companies need to look out for when selling overseas on foreign online marketplaces.

    This time, I’d like to delve into the five simple strategies you need to employ on an ongoing basis to make sure that your foreign language ecommerce website is performing in the search engines.

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    Let’s say that you’ve done your research online using a tool like Google’s Global Market Finder, and you’ve identified an overseas market where your product or service might have a customer base.

    You’ve had your website content professionally translated and localized, your website set-up has been optimized for its new markets (navigation, design, etc) , you’ve researched the top performing keywords for your product in the target language and used them to optimize your content, and you’ve launched your new site on a subdomain off your main site, or better yet, its own country-code Top Level Domain.

    Now how do you get your site to appear in the high traffic top three results on Google (or the local equivalent) for your chosen keywords? Here’s how:

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    Link-building

    The number one way to climb the search results for your chosen keywords is to build links to your website using your keywords as the anchor text. The key here is that quality is more important than quantity – a few links from editorial websites with high Alexa rankings will be far more valuable than a bunch of links from low value directories or unrelated blogs.

    The best way to build links is to engage native speaking PR and copywriting experts, who understand how to contact the editors of relevant industry websites in the local internet to pitch expert content, and can then write that content and optimize it with your keywords.

    Ongoing Keyword Research

    Keywords are not static – search trends are constantly changing across all languages. So while you may be doing well for your main keywords for which you’ve been building links, you also need to have your search specialists monitoring the performance of your top keywords and identifying new ‘long-tail’ keywords in the target language which are generating significant traffic.

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    New Optimized Content

    But what do you do with these new keywords once you’ve found them? It’s not always feasible to add a new static page to your website for every new keyword opportunity, bulking it up until your site becomes a misshapen Frankenstein monster with pages tacked on all over, like the New York subway of websites.

    This is where a blog on your foreign language website will come in handy – not only does it keep your content ticking over and fresh, but you can also use posts to address new keyword opportunities.

    Paid Search

    Paid Search is the best way to get to the top of the search results immediately, and to test the performance of your chosen keywords, with a guaranteed return on investment (since you only pay per click). Your multilingual search specialists should use your paid search campaigns to monitor the performance of your top keywords, as well as testing out new opportunities.

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    Social Media

    Last, but certainly not least, is social media – and while it’s near impossible to calculate social media marketing’s ROI, online businesses simply can’t afford to ignore social media in the 21st century. You should set-up profiles on the popular social networks in your target country (Facebook and Twitter are good bets, but local champions such as Qzone in China and Orkut in Brazil are also important) and keep your profiles updated regularly (several times a week at least) with useful, engaging, correctly translated content. Videos, competitions and other interactive content is particularly good!

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    Small Business Ideas for Going International 5 Tips for Taking Home Businesses to the Retail Worldwide 5 Strategies for Marketing Your Foreign Language Ecommerce Website

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    Last Updated on February 15, 2019

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

    Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

    Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

    So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

    Joe’s Goals

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      Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

      Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

      Daytum

        Daytum

        is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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        Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

        Excel or Numbers

          If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

          What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

          Evernote

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            I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

            Evernote is free with a premium version available.

            Access or Bento

              If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

              Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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              You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

              Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

              All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

              Conclusion

              I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

              What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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