Advertising

5 Must Have iPhone Apps for an IT Pro’s Mobile Toolkit

Advertising
5 Must Have iPhone Apps for an IT Pro’s Mobile Toolkit
    Photo credit: Sorensiim (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

    The iPhone has enabled the IT workforce to become more mobile than ever before. In order to capitalize on this and make IT more efficient on the go, a mobile IT toolkit is needed. However, of the 450,000 apps, which are useful to IT and of those which are worth having?

    I’m not talking about apps that are universally useful (i.e. Evernote, Dropbox, Free Wi-Fi Finder, etc.). Nor am I referring to apps that are beneficial only to IT with access to a specific system (i.e. Cymphonix Mobile Monitor, MobileIron, etc.). While those are truly beneficial (especially Evernote – which has my vote for greatest app ever), I am referring to the apps that IT professionals can use regardless of their setup.

    So what are they?

    Advertising

    Wyse PocketCloud ($0.99 Basic, $14.99 Pro)

      One of the most useful apps I have in my toolkit for remote connectivity.

      I currently use the basic version which allows me total access to terminal servers and/or supported PC’s. I can manage Windows desktops remotely via RDP (remote desktop protocol) or VNC, and do so with much smoother navigation than I have found with other RDP apps. The Pro version offers a VMware option, eliminates banner ads and throws in a  few other knick knacks. For me, however, the basic version is sufficient for my connectivity needs.

      Documents to Go (D2G) ($9.99 Office, $16.99 Premium)

        IT has to have the ability to access and/or modify documents on the go. Whether its a Word document or a Spreadsheet containing network specs; IT needs this functionality away from the office PC.
        Advertising

        Documents to Go (D2G) provides this functionality while also allowing changes to these files to be synced between your desktop and mobile device. D2G Premium adds features like: syncing to Dropbox, SugarSync, Google Docs, Box.Net, etc. It also allows the creation and editing of PowerPoint files. This app is almost as handy as the toilet and running water…well…almost. I mean it’s handy, but it’s not worth going back to the outhouse bucket tossin’ days!

        Deep WHOIS (Free)

          This app allows you to search public WHOIS databases for hostnames, domains, IP Addresses, and more.

          This is a must have for network and system admins who are in charge of infrastructure security. It is especially handy when“bird dogging” a particular domain name in hopes of registering it when it expires.

          Advertising

           

          Net Master ($0.99/$4.99)

            This app offers a ton of features and functionality, including some of most vital tools for network administration.

            You can scan and run diagnostics on every device connected to your Local Area Network (LAN), including ARP table scanning, Port scanning, NetBIOS scanning and Bonjour scanning. You also have the ability to perform Reverse DNS lookups, perform Trace Routes, a subnet calculator and much more. This is a highly used app in my toolkit, and for $0.99 I highly recommend it. Hell, I would’ve paid $10 for this bad boy.

            Advertising

            Cisco SIO to Go (Free)

              The Cisco Security Intelligence Operations (SIO) To Go app provides a real-time alert system.

              It is extremely informative; which enables you to respond to real-time threats on your network. I find having the information this app provides at my fingertips, makes me much more efficient (not to mention more knowledgeable). The presentation of real-time information from Cisco’s threat research center makes this a vital tool to anyone who deals with IT security.

              So, these are just some of the best apps on the iPhone to get IT work done faster and better. Are there any other apps out there that an IT Pro can’t live without? If so, drop them in the comments below.

              Advertising

               

               

              More by this author

              New Year’s Resolution: Stop Paying for Antivirus Protection 3 Windows Shortcuts Anyone Can Use 5 Must Have iPhone Apps for an IT Pro’s Mobile Toolkit

              Trending in Technology

              1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

              Read Next

              Advertising
              Advertising

              Last Updated on November 25, 2021

              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

              Advertising
              How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

              There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

              Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                What Does Private Browsing Do?

                When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

                Advertising

                The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                The Terminal Archive

                While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

                Advertising

                Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                Clearing Your Tracks

                Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

                Advertising

                dscacheutil -flushcache

                As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

                Advertising

                As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

                Read Next