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5 Awesome Features In OS X Yosemite That You Surely Can’t Miss

5 Awesome Features In OS X Yosemite That You Surely Can’t Miss

Apple’s latest new OS X release, OS X Yosemite, was released as a free upgrade on October 16, 2014. Since that release date, the adoption rate has been very, very impressive. Already, in just over a month, almost 20% of Mac users have taken advantage of the free upgrade, mostly upgrading from OS X Mavericks, the predecessor that was also a free OS upgrade, released in 2013.

If you are still on the fence about upgrading to OS X Yosemite, here is a roundup of the best features in Yosemite, a roundup that might just convince you enough to take the plunge and go all Yosemite!

1. Ready for Handoff?

Apple customers have always loved the fluidity of use across the Apple ecosystem, easily jumping from one Apple device to another. With the average Mac user having at least an iPhone and maybe even an iPad, it made great sense for apple to release a Mac OS that allowed Macs to seamlessly integrate with other Apple mobile devices.

The result is Handoff, the ability to start reading a web page on your Mac, say your MacBook, read some more on your iPhone and maybe finish it off on your iPad, always starting from exactly where you left off. That is the power of Handoff.

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Handoff also offers exciting functionality with Mail, Safari, calendar, contacts, numbers, pages, keynote as well as messages. Many third party applications are also now modifying their programs so you will be able to take advantage of Handoff in the future.All you will need to get Handoff to work is one iCloud account that you will use on all your Apple devices. That’s it!

Here’s a link to a very good article on how to use Handoff.

2. Your Mac goes Ring, Ring, Ring!

That’s right. You will now be able to make phone calls on your iMac, MacBook Pro, MacBook Air or any other Mac that can run on Yosemite.

If you wish, you can use Yosemite’s continuity feature to receive calls, make calls, read messages, reply to messages and pretty much use your Mac as a smartphone. Why, you might ask? Well, if you have buckled down in front of your Mac in serious work mode and want to stay focused without having to attend to your iPhone or iPad, continuity in Yosemite will allow you to do just that.

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3. Yosemite brings more privacy

Yosemite makes your browsing activities more private. Previously, if you went to clear your cache in Safari, all you saw was an option called “Clear Website History.” What about cookies, history and all that other stuff you might want to clear?

When you load up Safari in Yosemite, you will be given the option to clear up these components specifically. Thus, Yosemite gives you more control over your level of privacy protection.

Also, Yosemite has been modified in such a way that search queries typed into the address bar will now return results from DuckDuckGo, an oddly named but very impressive search engine that has become very popular, primarily because it doesn’t collect and store your search patterns, unlike Google.

4. Edit mail attachments while in mail itself

Almost everyone has been in the following situation; you have attached a file in your email and are ready to hit the send button. Then, you realize that you have to edit that attachment. Groan! Open the word document, edit, save and re-attach, right? Wrong, at least when you are using Yosemite!

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Yosemite mail will allow you to edit your attachment right when you are inside of mail, before you rocket off that email into cyberspace. You can add text and even add pictures or doodles to your email attachments if you want! Our guess is that this is a feature you will end up using even if you are the most meticulous person out there.

5. File transfer from iPhone to your Mac? No more cables!

Considering how technology has advanced, you would think that sending a file from your phone to your Mac would take just a push of a button, right? The answer, as you might know, was a big, frustrating No! You were required to connect your iPhone to your Mac with that little cable that is always just a little inconveniently short open up finder, find the file and drag drop it onto your Mac or vice-versa.

Yosemite changes that and makes file transfers with a push of a button possible, all wirelessly. The feature is called AirDrop. AirDrop actually isn’t new. It was available before but only worked between iPhones and iPads. Now, with Yosemite, AirDrop works all across the Apple hardware ecosystem, even on your Mac computers.

Of course, it is not just the above features that make Yosemite an attractive upgrade for your Mac. You also get a fantastically minimal, transparent and refreshed UI, a faster and more robust Safari browser, polished maps with 3D views, an exciting dark mode for distraction free work, a vibrant dashboard corner, advanced and more intuitive notifications and even cool things like the ability to add mail signatures with trackpad signatures.

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Considering that Yosemite is a free upgrade, it is definitely worth upgrading to right away. Despite the many goodies that Yosemite can bring to your Mac, you must also be aware that there is a small chance that Yosemite can also result in slowed performance on your Mac. However, thankfully, such problems are very fixable. Here’s a great resource on fixing Yosemite related performance issues that might come in handy if you do run into problems after the upgrade to Yosemite: Mac slow after Yosemite Update? Fix It.

Go on, go Yosemite and enjoy your Mac like you never did before! Here’s the official download link for OS X Yosemite at iTunes.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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