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4 Tricks for Twitter Marketing

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4 Tricks for Twitter Marketing

In today’s social media landscape, Twitter is king. Twitter is an addictive way of sharing one’s thoughts and invaluable tool for bloggers and organizations with good content seeking new audiences. There are 600 million searches on Twitter each day—more than Yahoo and Bing combined. However, this also means that most tweets get lost in the endless void of the Twitter-verse. The art of writing tweets with viral potential can help you rise above and grow an audience organically while staying relevant and connected with them. Here are four tips for more effective tweets:

1. Use Hashtags and Trends

In an average day, there are 350 million tweets sent per day, with 750 tweets being shared per second. In order to organize the chaos and make tweets more searchable, many tweeters use hashtags—a unique form of organization created and managed by Twitter (and now Facebook) users. The top 10 most popular hashtags (and even proper nouns) are listed in the “Trends” section of your Twitter interface, but by checking the “Discover” tab, you can search for active, existing trends that align with your content. Try to include one or two relevant and timely hashtags in your tweets, but don’t overdo it and always make sure that the tweet is still easy to read.

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2. Make Friends

As you begin to connect with your audience, remember that social media is just that—social. Without including and engaging others, Twitter becomes a wasteland of links: in fact, 71% of tweets receive no reaction—replies, retweets, or even favorites—whatsoever. But the odds of getting a reaction increase dramatically just by mentioning another tweeter. Establishing a presence in a certain group or niche takes a dedicated effort and a willingness to have a collaborate. Keep in mind that if you keep your tweet under 120 characters, your followers can add RT @YourHandle in front of the tweet. Once you have some captive followers, try to spark more interaction within your tweet by asking questions or providing interesting facts, news, and conversation starters.

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3. Smarter Searches

When composing a tweet, remember that Twitter is a search engine. Using Google Analytics or a similar tool to research popular search terms in your niche is a good way to reach larger potential audiences. Approximately 42 characters are factored into each tweet’s title tag, including the account name, as well as the initial characters of each tweet. From a creative standpoint, think of your tweet as a headline in a newspaper—something that catches the reader’s eye and makes them want to learn more. Using a URL shortener such as Bit.ly also makes your tweets shorter, sweeter, and more engaging.

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4. Timing is Everything

The average lifespan of a tweet is less than one hour. After that, the chances of getting a reply or a retweet are nearly nonexistent. However, you can use this to your advantage by using Buffer or another automated tweet scheduling application to tweet at optimum hours for your audience, to reach demographics outside of your location and timezone (some companies even try different languages, though English is by far the most common language on Twitter), and to free yourself to focus more on your content. 25% of all users check Twitter periodically throughout the day, but 10-11pm (local time) is generally the most Twitter-active period of the day.

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By using these tips and tricks, not only will you gain followers on Twitter—you will also increase traffic to your site or blog and your readers will become more engaged and more likely to share your content. Though Twitter is dominated by “elite” tweeters, such as celebrities and short-lived viral sensations, it is still one of the best free marketing tools available. And with the right tweet, you never know who will find you.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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