Advertising
Advertising

4 More Ways to Create an Online Resume

4 More Ways to Create an Online Resume


    The last time I was here, we looked at how to use your Linkedin data to create a stunning visual resume with Re.Vu.

    If you tried the service and found it wasn’t for you, here’s a few more nifty websites that also do a great job of displaying your resume.

    1. Visualize.Me

    Visualize.Me handles many of the functions I raved about when reviewing Re.Vu, and handles them very well.

    Advertising

    The layout is simple yet very effective, with room for your work experience, skills and education, plus options to include languages spoken, recommendations and more. Pulling a page together takes no more than a few clicks, and where Visualize.Me triumphs over Re.Vu is in the ability to further customize fonts and colours.

      Despite all that, the overall results aren’t quite as appealing to the eye as other sites, though as a good alternative to those sites, Visualize.Me is certainly the number one contender.

      2. ResumUP

      Another site offering to take your data from other services and make pretty pictures from it, ResumUP initially eschews Linkedin in favour of Facebook and Twitter. This is great if your data is available for the world to see on Facebook (more of which later), but if you’ve opted for privacy, this appears to be of little use.

      Advertising

         

        Logging in for the first time presents you with a heavily-customizable resume that is quite overwhelming. Whereas other services place simplicity at their core, ResumUp has so much going on at once that it can be off-putting.

        Sure, the infographs it creates are arguably the most attractive of any service we’ve looked at, but combined, they create a resume which seems far too busy to really be effective.

        Advertising

        3. About.Me

        About.Me may not be able to do anything fancy with social networking data, but that’s actually one its strengths.

        Here, you only really need two things; a nice background image and some brief text. Put the two together with the site’s easy-to-use layout tools and what you’re left with is a great-looking profile which really grabs the attention. Most of that attention is immediately drawn to the background image, which unquestionably takes pride of place here. On the downside, this means that, unlike other sites who do the visual stuff for you, the onus on making your page stand out is all on you.

          The site does have its own gallery of backgrounds that do look fantastic on any page, though using one of the ready-made backgrounds limits the opportunity to create a page that’s personal to you.

          Advertising

          About.Me’s other main selling point is the stats it produces, providing you with a detailed background of how your page views, referrers and search terms people used to find you. Useful stuff that could well help you improve your page with a bit of search engine optimisation.

          4. Facebook

          More commonly known as the realm of embarrassing photographs and updates on the trivialities of every day life, Facebook’s new Timeline does provide a great opportunity to display your resume.

          The ‘Life Event’ option can be used for inputting your work history, ‘Places’ for countries visited or areas of the world you’ve worked in and not to mention photos for a visual display of your proudest achievements. But if you’d rather keep your Facebook profile a private affair, why not consider creating your own Facebook page and making it another tool in your personal brand.

          After all, what better platform to sell your skills than on one of the most popular websites in the world?

          Conclusion

          Whether its through one of the sites above or not, the opportunities to get creative with your online resume are abundant. Find what works for you and may your resume bring you much success — however you chose to create it.

          (Photo credit: JOB via Shutterstock)

          More by this author

          Chris Skoyles

          Coach, and trainee counsellor specializing in mental health and addiction.

          15 Successful People with Autism Who Have Inspired Millions of People 15 Natural Insomnia Cures That You Haven’t Tried But Actually Work 10 Anxiety Relief Apps to Take the Edge Off When Stress Hits Hard 13 Ideas on How to Help Depression That Just Won’t Go Away How Relaxing Music for Kids Can Help ADHD (+ Music Recommendations)

          Trending in Technology

          1 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 2 7 Clever Goal Tracker Apps to Make the Most of Your Business in 2019 3 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance 4 18 Best Time Management Apps and Tools (2019 Updated) 5 16 Less Known Gmail Hacks That Will Super Boost Your Productivity

          Read Next

          Advertising
          Advertising
          Advertising

          Last Updated on February 15, 2019

          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

          Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

          Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

          Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

          So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

          Joe’s Goals

          Advertising

             

            Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

            Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

            Daytum

              Daytum

              is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

              Advertising

              Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

              Excel or Numbers

                If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                Evernote

                Advertising

                  I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                  Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                  Access or Bento

                    If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                    Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

                    Advertising

                    You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                    Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                    All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                    Conclusion

                    I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                    What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

                    Read Next