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4 More Ways to Create an Online Resume

4 More Ways to Create an Online Resume


    The last time I was here, we looked at how to use your Linkedin data to create a stunning visual resume with Re.Vu.

    If you tried the service and found it wasn’t for you, here’s a few more nifty websites that also do a great job of displaying your resume.

    1. Visualize.Me

    Visualize.Me handles many of the functions I raved about when reviewing Re.Vu, and handles them very well.

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    The layout is simple yet very effective, with room for your work experience, skills and education, plus options to include languages spoken, recommendations and more. Pulling a page together takes no more than a few clicks, and where Visualize.Me triumphs over Re.Vu is in the ability to further customize fonts and colours.

      Despite all that, the overall results aren’t quite as appealing to the eye as other sites, though as a good alternative to those sites, Visualize.Me is certainly the number one contender.

      2. ResumUP

      Another site offering to take your data from other services and make pretty pictures from it, ResumUP initially eschews Linkedin in favour of Facebook and Twitter. This is great if your data is available for the world to see on Facebook (more of which later), but if you’ve opted for privacy, this appears to be of little use.

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        Logging in for the first time presents you with a heavily-customizable resume that is quite overwhelming. Whereas other services place simplicity at their core, ResumUp has so much going on at once that it can be off-putting.

        Sure, the infographs it creates are arguably the most attractive of any service we’ve looked at, but combined, they create a resume which seems far too busy to really be effective.

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        3. About.Me

        About.Me may not be able to do anything fancy with social networking data, but that’s actually one its strengths.

        Here, you only really need two things; a nice background image and some brief text. Put the two together with the site’s easy-to-use layout tools and what you’re left with is a great-looking profile which really grabs the attention. Most of that attention is immediately drawn to the background image, which unquestionably takes pride of place here. On the downside, this means that, unlike other sites who do the visual stuff for you, the onus on making your page stand out is all on you.

          The site does have its own gallery of backgrounds that do look fantastic on any page, though using one of the ready-made backgrounds limits the opportunity to create a page that’s personal to you.

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          About.Me’s other main selling point is the stats it produces, providing you with a detailed background of how your page views, referrers and search terms people used to find you. Useful stuff that could well help you improve your page with a bit of search engine optimisation.

          4. Facebook

          More commonly known as the realm of embarrassing photographs and updates on the trivialities of every day life, Facebook’s new Timeline does provide a great opportunity to display your resume.

          The ‘Life Event’ option can be used for inputting your work history, ‘Places’ for countries visited or areas of the world you’ve worked in and not to mention photos for a visual display of your proudest achievements. But if you’d rather keep your Facebook profile a private affair, why not consider creating your own Facebook page and making it another tool in your personal brand.

          After all, what better platform to sell your skills than on one of the most popular websites in the world?

          Conclusion

          Whether its through one of the sites above or not, the opportunities to get creative with your online resume are abundant. Find what works for you and may your resume bring you much success — however you chose to create it.

          (Photo credit: JOB via Shutterstock)

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          Chris Skoyles

          Coach, and trainee counsellor specializing in mental health and addiction.

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          Last Updated on May 14, 2019

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

          Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

          1. Zoho Notebook
            If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
          2. Evernote
            The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
          3. Net Notes
            If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
          4. i-Lighter
            You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
          5. Clipmarks
            For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
          6. UberNote
            If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
          7. iLeonardo
            iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
          8. Zotero
            Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

          I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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          In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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