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4 More Ways to Create an Online Resume

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4 More Ways to Create an Online Resume


    The last time I was here, we looked at how to use your Linkedin data to create a stunning visual resume with Re.Vu.

    If you tried the service and found it wasn’t for you, here’s a few more nifty websites that also do a great job of displaying your resume.

    1. Visualize.Me

    Visualize.Me handles many of the functions I raved about when reviewing Re.Vu, and handles them very well.

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    The layout is simple yet very effective, with room for your work experience, skills and education, plus options to include languages spoken, recommendations and more. Pulling a page together takes no more than a few clicks, and where Visualize.Me triumphs over Re.Vu is in the ability to further customize fonts and colours.

      Despite all that, the overall results aren’t quite as appealing to the eye as other sites, though as a good alternative to those sites, Visualize.Me is certainly the number one contender.

      2. ResumUP

      Another site offering to take your data from other services and make pretty pictures from it, ResumUP initially eschews Linkedin in favour of Facebook and Twitter. This is great if your data is available for the world to see on Facebook (more of which later), but if you’ve opted for privacy, this appears to be of little use.

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        Logging in for the first time presents you with a heavily-customizable resume that is quite overwhelming. Whereas other services place simplicity at their core, ResumUp has so much going on at once that it can be off-putting.

        Sure, the infographs it creates are arguably the most attractive of any service we’ve looked at, but combined, they create a resume which seems far too busy to really be effective.

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        3. About.Me

        About.Me may not be able to do anything fancy with social networking data, but that’s actually one its strengths.

        Here, you only really need two things; a nice background image and some brief text. Put the two together with the site’s easy-to-use layout tools and what you’re left with is a great-looking profile which really grabs the attention. Most of that attention is immediately drawn to the background image, which unquestionably takes pride of place here. On the downside, this means that, unlike other sites who do the visual stuff for you, the onus on making your page stand out is all on you.

          The site does have its own gallery of backgrounds that do look fantastic on any page, though using one of the ready-made backgrounds limits the opportunity to create a page that’s personal to you.

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          About.Me’s other main selling point is the stats it produces, providing you with a detailed background of how your page views, referrers and search terms people used to find you. Useful stuff that could well help you improve your page with a bit of search engine optimisation.

          4. Facebook

          More commonly known as the realm of embarrassing photographs and updates on the trivialities of every day life, Facebook’s new Timeline does provide a great opportunity to display your resume.

          The ‘Life Event’ option can be used for inputting your work history, ‘Places’ for countries visited or areas of the world you’ve worked in and not to mention photos for a visual display of your proudest achievements. But if you’d rather keep your Facebook profile a private affair, why not consider creating your own Facebook page and making it another tool in your personal brand.

          After all, what better platform to sell your skills than on one of the most popular websites in the world?

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          Conclusion

          Whether its through one of the sites above or not, the opportunities to get creative with your online resume are abundant. Find what works for you and may your resume bring you much success — however you chose to create it.

          (Photo credit: JOB via Shutterstock)

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          Chris Skoyles

          Coach, and trainee counsellor specializing in mental health and addiction.

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          Last Updated on December 18, 2020

          Can Technology have Biases Like Humans?

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          Can Technology have Biases Like Humans?

          Technology has taken a vantage leap in providing solutions for man. Before now, technology used to appear complex and would require a great deal of expertise to handle solutions available. Today, we have technology applicable in the simplest human activities as smart products with intelligent algorithms powering them as they make error-free judgments and provide intelligent and analytic solutions.

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          This article from Credit Suisse, tells us that technology does not have all the answers because it has been found to exhibit “similar biases,” as humans. No one can discredit the impact of technology, but it is not totally free of human input and this is the reason we experience these biases in many areas we have technology holding foot.

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          Creating technological solutions transparently

          This article suggests that the process of creating technological solutions be made transparent and subject to contribution from many people who would end up as users of the product – male, female, young, old, learned, unlearned and all other preferences as we have them. It also underscores the importance of having women on product development teams. This approach is not sure to eliminate all forms of bias, but it is a good way to start in order to appraise the full benefits of technology.

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          Technology as the connecting tool

          Technology so far has been a major connecting tool amongst us humans. It is used and appreciated by all regardless of race, language and sex. In order to keep it less subjective to these arguments about human biases. I believe we should gather opinions on products and solutions before making them available to the public. This could be done by gathering input from intended target users and receiving feedback across the stages of production.

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          “Recognizing the problem is a start…success will depend on inclusive technologies that meet this vast untapped market.” This cannot be more apt especially at a time when we look up to technology for solutions. We should not muzzle our progress with technology by battling algorithm bias. The first way to avoid this battle is by reading this article here.

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