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12 iPhone Apps for Meditation

12 iPhone Apps for Meditation

You might have built up the habit of meditation and relaxation and made it fit into your daily schedule, but when you are traveling or work gets too busy, you might still be cutting it out.

Meditation might be one of the first things you omit from your busy schedule when you are running from one meeting in city A to another conference in country B. You’ll rest, relax and recharge your mental and spiritual batteries afterwards, right? With a planning that might go from 8 am to 10 pm, there is simply no time to meditate.

Well, think again—if you want to enjoy mental clarity and be your best, most grounded self during those important meetings away from your regular workplace, then you will need your meditation during those very days. More than ever, you need to tap into that deeper level and take full advantage of the benefits of meditation.

Ideally, you wake up in your hotel room extra early in the morning to squeeze in at least 10 minutes of meditation, but when you are constantly rushing from one place to the other, you still don’t have an excuse to just drop the meditation. Instead, you can use apps on your iPhone to convert some of your transit time (cab ride, waiting time in an airport terminal… anywhere goes!) in your little meditation retreat, your point of centering and balance in the midst of all business and chaos. Using some of your lunch break time to refresh you mind, perhaps combined with some walking meditation, is another lovely way to create order and space in your mind again.

A wide range of apps are available to bring you your relaxation wherever, whenever. You can choose a guided breathing exercise, a complete guided meditation that uses binaural beats to bring you into the right level of mind more quickly, or simply some sounds of nature or white noise that can help you block out distractions so that you can turn your attention inward.

Simply take your headphones, close your eyes and let these apps guide you—whether you are on an airplane, on your commute, or in a hotel bedroom:

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1. Pranayama

Universal Breathing 1

    This app helps you focus on your breathing by helping you count your inhalations and exhalations according to a fixed ratio. This app is minimalist, but uses different sounds to identify the right times for inhaling and exhaling.

    2. Spiritual healing

    Burt Goldman, the American monk, guides you into your soul or into a healing meditation. He uses a three-to-one countdown to help you go deep within.

    3. Silva Relax

    Deep Relaxation

      Laura Silva, from the Silva method, guides you through a long or short centering exercise. Very powerful!

      4. Take a Break

      Lovely short guided relaxation meditations, that are perfect for your lunch break. Find a quiet, comfortable place and let this app help you to refresh your mind.

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      5. Relaxation

      Another guided meditation that rejuvenates you. This meditation is particularly helpful in the evening. After a busy day of meetings, you might find it difficult to unwind and relax your mind so that you can achieve deep sleep.

      relaxation 1

        6. Pocket retreat

        Zen-inspired guided breathing meditations, also including suggestions for when you decide taking your own meditation retreat.

        7. Wisdom

        Meditation 4

          A meditation to help you tap into your inner wisdom—recommended for the difficult days at work, or whenever you need to connect inwards.

          8. Zazen (Lite)

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          Zazen Meditation

            A great mindfulness bell and timer app for those who may prefer not to use guided meditations. It’s a good idea to combine this app with a meditation in which you simply focus on your breathing.

            9. Relax Lite

            relax lite

              A guided body scan that will help you slide into slumber in no time.

              10. eSleepLite

              esleep

                Designed as a sleep app, you can use these background noises to block outside disturbances when you want to have some quiet peace of mind while being on the go.

                11. Naturespace

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                Naturespace

                  Naturespace brings you into a beautiful imaginary scenery by using special holographic sound technology.

                  12. Omvana

                  Omvana

                    Omvana is probably the most extensive meditation app out there. You can mix and match voices ( narrating guided instructions) with background sounds.

                    Try out some these apps, and you’ll see that they can give you that little bit of extra zen when you need it the most!

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                    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

                    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

                    1. Zoho Notebook
                      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
                    2. Evernote
                      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
                    3. Net Notes
                      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
                    4. i-Lighter
                      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
                    5. Clipmarks
                      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
                    6. UberNote
                      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
                    7. iLeonardo
                      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
                    8. Zotero
                      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

                    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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                    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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