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11 Best Websites And Apps For Students

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11 Best Websites And Apps For Students

Being a college student can be hard, especially when it comes to studying and actually retaining the information with all these distractions on our phones and laptops like Twitter, Snapchat, and CandyCrush. Luckily, there are apps to help us study and stay on track through out our procrastinated study times. These are the best websites and apps for students to use when studying!

1. Wakerupper

This one isn’t necessarily an app but rather a phone call to wake you up on a big exam day or if you need a reminder for your study group. I like it because I tend to push snore on my snooze button but if I get a phone call, I’m more willing to look at it and answer. You even have the option to put in a reminder of what you’re suppose to be doing.

2. Lighthead

A lot of students don’t buy the reading material because we can find it online. Instead of printing it out (to save trees, not because we’re lazy), we’ll read it on our computers. But if you spend too long with out touching any keys or moving the mouse, your laptop will fall asleep. This app prevents your laptop from doing that while you read.

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*This is for Mac only.

3. Self-Control

This will help you stray away from distracting websites during your study time. It’s basically sets a block on certain websites or apps like Twitter, Facebook or anything else that could be distracting while you’re studying. It helps you get more done, instead of you wasting your time.

*This is for Mac only.

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4. ColdTurkey

This is basically Self Control but for Windows. It temporarily blocks social media and games while you study to keep you from procrastinating. They also just came out with a new feature where you can have certain groups of websites you want to block.

*This is for Windows only.

5. Focusbar

This app reminds you what you’re suppose to be doing when you start straying to other things. It helps keep you on task to a certain thing until you’re done.

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*This is for Mac only.

6. Positive Reinforcement

This app allows you to type your paper or essay and for every one hundred words it give you a positive reinforcement. By positive reinforcement, I mean it’ll show you a picture of a kitten, bunny or puppy. And how could you hate that?

7. Negative Reinforcement

This does the opposite of the Positive Reinforcement. This one times you for the amount of time you wanted to be writing. If you don’t make it to the number of words you wanted within that time then it shows you a scary image.

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8. Another Writing App

This doesn’t let you see what you’re writing until you’ve hit your word goal. It lets all your thoughts flow instead of you constantly seeing what you’re writing and going back and changing it.

9. Hemingway Editor

This will clean up your paper for you. It highlights things that you need to fix or change so you can go back and do that. I don’t mean grammar errors. It literally tells you which sentences are too long and need to be split up and which words need to be changed from an adverb to a verb.

Also, they just came out with a desktop version!

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10. Squirt

This lets you read one word at time. It’s really useful if you have trouble reading and focusing in on things. It’s basically like speed reading anything on the web. So if you have to read large amounts of articles at a time for research, then this is good for you.

11. Final Grade Calculator

This is just a final grade calculator, just input some test scores and homework grades and it will calculate what you could possibly make as a final grade depending on what you have left to do. Some of us need that little beam of hope and others will just need a fire lit under their ass to really motivate them.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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