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10 Must-Have iPhone and iPad Apps for Designers

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10 Must-Have iPhone and iPad Apps for Designers

When inspiration for a new design hits, are you ready to capture it?

From capturing artful street graffiti to remembering stunning color palettes to providing feedback for developers, today’s mobile designer must be able to work on the go.

With these 10 apps for your iPhone and iPad, designers can capture, share, and remember the little moments of creativity that may hit at any given moment.

1. Loose Leaf

loose_leaf

    With Loose Leaf, you can doodle, annotate, and share your ideas. Import photos, draw quick diagrams, cut and crop with scissors. The app’s scissors functionality allows you to easily crop out any photo and piece it together with another background.

    Loose Leaf is engineered to be a simple, no fuss, mobile dry erase board. It is perfect for simple drawings, diagrams, quick notes or annotations.

    iOS ($4.99)

    2. Marvel

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    Marvel Prototype

      The Marvel iPhone and iPad app turns simple sketches on paper into interactive, tappable prototypes that allow you to demo your app ideas and share with others.

      Draw your app screens on paper, whiteboards (or napkins!) and then take photos of each screen using the app. Everything is synced with Dropbox and pushed your Marvel web account, which is automatically set-up for you at www.marvelapp.com.

      iOS (Free)

      3. POP

      POP - Prototyping on Paper

        POP is another app that allows designers to draw sketches on paper, take a picture of the sketch, and connect them to make interactive prototypes.

        The app integrates 128 bit SSL encryption, the most powerful security out there, to keep your ideas and data safe. POP offers 5 types of transitions, including fade, next, back, rise, and dismiss.

        iOS (Free)

        4. Skitch

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        Skitch

          Skitch by Evernote helps designers visually share their thoughts with others. You can give feedback and get your ideas across faster using annotation, shapes, and sketches. You can also open a PDF and highlight changes, so you can skip the lengthy, confusing email chains and give clear feedback.

          iOS (Free)

          5. Udemy

          udemy

            Udemy is the world’s largest destination for online courses, training, and tutorials. You can watch courses on the go, offline and at 2x speed. With the Udemy app, you can squeeze in a few lectures on your commute. You can also find amazing courses on design or tutorials on the newest software packages.

            iOS (Free)

            6. Design Shots–Dribbble Client

            Design Shots for Dribbble

              Browse Dribbble on your iPhone. Scroll through the images posted by the best designers on Dribbble, view animated GIFs, share the images.

              See Dribbble shots from people you follow, like and comment on shots, and follow users.

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              iOS (Free)

              7. Adobe Color

              adobe-color

                Extract color themes from the world around you using your camera, Creative Cloud, or any existing image from your photo albums.

                Edit or refine color themes and experiment with different combinations using the interactive color wheel or edit your colors using RGB color sliders. Create color themes with pre-sets based on color theory–a great option if you’re getting started or looking for quick inspiration.

                iOS (Free)

                8. Fontli

                Fontli

                  Fontli is a social network for typography enthusiasts to broadcast their passion through pictures taken from a mobile device.

                  Users can spot a typeface by simple photo tagging. Fontli then gives additional information on the typeface, such as Designer/Foundry info and other pictures tagged with it.

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                  iOS (Free)

                  9. Ikonica

                  Ikonica

                    Ikonica lets you easily test different icon designs on springboard and in various backgrounds and sizes.

                    Simply upload an icon image from your camera roll, or drag and drop from your Mac and get an instant preview on all your devices.

                    iOS (Free)

                    10. Word Swag

                    Word Swag

                      Create beautifully customized text layouts that would normally take minutes–or even hours–with just a tap of your finger.

                      Word Swag has hundreds of quotes, thoughts, and jokes so you are never at a loss for words.

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                      iOS ($3.99)

                      Featured photo credit: Using iPhone 6 on Business Meeting/VIKTOR HANACEK via picjumbo.com

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                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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