Advertising

10 Google Docs Features You’ll Probably Never Know If You Don’t Read This

Advertising
10 Google Docs Features You’ll Probably Never Know If You Don’t Read This

After three years of using a Chromebook and being a student at university for almost one year, Google Drive is a must to master and something that I would never missed out on learning. Here are some super cool tricks that will get you word processing like a professional now you are using Google Drive.

Keep an eye on your collaborators – You can now look at “Activity” within each folder within your Google Drive. You won’t believe how useful this feature is, when you have a group of eager students editing away then to find a document has been deleted by a team member you can then hunt them down based on this feature. It is also useful for reviewing what others have been working on. This feature can be found when clicking the “i” icon on every folder page.

Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 16.34.41

    Be that colourful inside – When making a folder, don’t be boring. Who wants to be boring? Add some spice to your visuals, click on the drop-down next to each folder to edit the colour of these and bring some life to these dreary documents and folders, they deserve more love.

    Advertising

    Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 16.38.39

      Keep “Recent” nearby – One of the nifty ways to beat the commute to searching through folders and folders to find that one document is to keep the recent tab nearby. This one has saved me many minutes and is good if you are developing a document and need it around to keep editing. To access this find “Recent” on the landing page below “Shared with me” and “Starred” on the left hand side of the screen.

      Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 16.42.24

        Add me! Add me! – This is a great little way to get those features that Microsoft Word has. Using Add-ons within a document allows you to add a feature to the word processing. For example, You can now add a bibliography creator that will save time in your essay writing and many more apps. These add-ons will be added to your add-on library and accessible in any other document, past or present.

        Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 16.46.15

          No don’t leave! – One feature that I feel I should be using more is the Research feature, this is a very hidden feature. Simply go to “Tools” and hit “Research” to take advantage of the ability to research items that you are looking for without leaving the safety of the document. Additionally, you can pull over images which saves a lot of typing of presidents’ names.

          Advertising

          Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 16.52.51

            Keyboard Pro? – Some people just hate the mouse but love the keyboard. Look into “Help” in the menu and find a tab named “Keyboard Shortcuts”. This cracking trick will help you learn the commands to work like a real Google Drive nerd without even leaving the proximity of the keys.

            Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 16.56.32

              Immerse yourself – Want to be in the zone? Perfect chance to get rid of that top bar on the Drive is the two arrows in the top right hand side of the screen. This will push up the menus and leave you with the bare minimum and allow you to focus that attention on the document at hand. Full immersion would be to add “Full Screen” as well using your core PC/Mac/Chrome OS settings.

              Advertising

              Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 17.00.11

                Don’t leave me for Gmail – One of the features that helps your speed when using Google Drive is the email as attachment feature. This is hidden in the “File” tab in menus and with a flick of “Email as attachment” you can send over the document in any format from HTML to PDF to any email address and is a great way to avoid going into emails and getting distracted.

                Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 17.04.04

                  Go back in time! – This feature has become very useful when doing coursework or long documents when you go off on a tangent. You can easily go into “File” in the menu and access “See Revision History” – this will take you to all the times that you have made a change on a document.

                  Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 17.20.03

                    Be a font person – In Google Drive, font are very much hidden from the user. Hover over the font drop-down menu and click “Add more fonts”, some of these fonts are impressive and can make your documents look more professional, creative and hipster.

                    Advertising

                    Screenshot 2014-05-26 at 17.27.45

                      All these tips are great at projecting the best possible usage of Google Drive. After using all these quick tricks after a month, I seemed to be working twice as effectively on Google Drive. Give them a try and don’t forget to ask for any assistance.

                      Featured photo credit: Tech Ticker via tech-ticker.com

                      More by this author

                      8 Apps to use in Summer 2016 11 Tools for Productive Individuals 52 Inspiring Quotes for Aspiring Leaders 15 Creative Tips and Resources to Efficiently Memorize Vocab How Google Calendar Can Make Your Life a Lot Easier

                      Trending in Technology

                      1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

                      Read Next

                      Advertising
                      Advertising

                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      Advertising
                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

                        Advertising

                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

                        Advertising

                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

                        Advertising

                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

                        Advertising

                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

                        Read Next