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10 Best iPhone Lens That Make iPhone Photography More Awesome

10 Best iPhone Lens That Make iPhone Photography More Awesome

Clicking and sharing photos is simple, fast, and fun with the iPhone. However, no matter how good iPhone’s built-in camera is, it doesn’t come close to a high-end professional camera. Thankfully, there are some brilliant camera and photo-editing apps that will help you extend the functionality of your iPhone.

How would you like to take high-resolution images or zoom in on a distant object to grab a great photo? Would you like to make the iPhone camera as good as your DSLR? Tough luck. There’s no apps for that.

However, you do have an option: invest in an iPhone camera or a lens kit to turn your smartphone into a powerful, all-purpose camera. Sure, they make your iPhone look a little funny, but they also make the pictures look awesome.

Here is our list of the ten best iPhone Lens:

1. VicTsing Detachable Red Fisheye Lens ($8.89)

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VicTsing Detachable Red Fisheye Lens

    This is a simple lens that attaches to your iPhone through a basic cord. It has a 180-degree fisheye lens. You can capture small objects in detail using this iPhone lens. If you are wondering whether it would be convenient to take pictures after attaching lenses to your iPhone, you can start out with this low-price option. Also, this is one of the few options that provide fisheye lens, which is handy to keep in your arsenal.

    2. Neewer 12.5X Magnifier Zoom Lens ($24.45)

    Neewer 12.5X Magnifier Zoom Lens

      If you are simply looking for a zoom lens to take pictures of distant objects, this product is great. It facilitates micro focus adjustments, making it less likely for images to appear contorted. On the downside, it doesn’t include a tripod or other accessories.

      3. Dot for iPhone ($39-49)

      Dot for iPhone

        Dot is a combination of app and hardware that makes the task of taking and sharing panoramas easy. For photographers who are really into 360-degree pictures, this is a must-have app. Additionally, Dot is easy to affix to the iPhone, and has an attractive design. The negative is in the quality of the lens, which isn’t as capable of high quality images as some other options listed here.

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        4. Photojojo Lenses ($20-99)

        Photojo iPhone Lens

          The Photojojo Lens Set includes five different lenses: fisheye, super fisheye, wide & macro, polarizer, and telephoto. You can try out any one, or all of them. A simple adhesive removable metal ring sticks to the phone, and you can attach any of the lenses to it, magnetically. With Photojojo’s easy design, you can turn your iPhone into a professional camera in seconds. On the flip side, these are only simple lenses for decent prices, but nothing extra.

          5. Phocus 3 Lens Bundle ($129.95)

          Phocus 3 Lens Bundle

            This bundle comes with three lenses: telephoto, wide angle, and macro. It also includes a carrying case that ensures easy access to all buttons and ports. The best thing about this bundle is the design: it fits snugly in the hand and makes the process of taking photos using the iPhone less cumbersome. The only problem is that it doesn’t ship with a fisheye lens. This means that you may have to buy it separately in future.

            6. PhoGo Case Kit, Lens and Sunhood ($79.95)

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            PhoGo Case Kit, Lens and Sunhood

              If your aim is to turn your iPhone into a complete camera, this bundle has it all: a good sun hood for better screen visibility, and three high quality lenses. The best part is that it is compatible with different brands of lenses and tripods. The downside is its bulkiness. It’s not the best choice if you are simply looking for some clip-on lens.

              7. MCamLite ($129.95)

              MCamLite iPhone Lens

                With its 37mm wide angle/macro lens, MCamLite truly extends the functionality of your iPhone camera. Its interchangeable lenses make the task of shooting awesome photos easier. The steep price may be a negative for some, but the benefits outweigh.

                8. PentaEye f – Pro ($178-$268)

                PentaEye f – Pro

                  For professional iPhoneographers who want to replace their camera equipment with their iPhone, this is one of the simplest options. As the name suggests, it contains a lens dial with a mount for 5 lenses. It also ships with 2 tripod mounts and 3 strap holders. The lens quality is good, and makes the phone look like a sci-fi camera. There’s just one little problem: it makes the iPhone a little heavy and is quite a handful to carry.

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                  9. Olloclip Lens ($69)

                  Olloclip Lens

                    The great thing about the iPhone is that you can simply put it in your pocket. If you have to carry around lots of lenses, it means that you need more space, and you may need to carry a bag. With Olloclip, you can even put the lenses in your pocket: all the lenses are built into one product. If you plan to use your iPhone as an enhanced point-and-shoot camera, Olloclip is ideal. The only potential problem is that there’s no support for tripods or other accessories.

                    10. Scheneider iPro Lens ($229)

                    Scheneider iPro Lens

                      This kit includes high-quality lenses that shoot stunning pictures and are not easily damaged. The three lenses are well designed and include tele, super, and wide lens. There’s a handle that can be affixed to any side of the case. The handle doubles as a tripod mount. The only downside is that it doesn’t have fisheye iPhone lens, and will burn a hole in your pocket.

                      In Summary

                      Whether you want just one lens for better zoom, or want a barrage of lenses that (almost) turn your iPhone into a DSLR, there are more than enough options in the market. These lenses are the perfect investment for serious iPhone photographers, and people who just love to extend the functionality of their mobile, alike.

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                      Last Updated on May 14, 2019

                      8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                      8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                      Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

                      1. Zoho Notebook
                        If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
                      2. Evernote
                        The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
                      3. Net Notes
                        If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
                      4. i-Lighter
                        You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
                      5. Clipmarks
                        For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
                      6. UberNote
                        If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
                      7. iLeonardo
                        iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
                      8. Zotero
                        Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

                      I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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                      In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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