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10 Best Chrome Extensions of 2012

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10 Best Chrome Extensions of 2012

2012 is the year of Google Chrome. According to StatCounter, Google Chrome clocked up a whopping 35% share of web browser usage which makes it the most widely used internet browser. We have picked the best Chrome extensions add-ons of 2012 for you to “add-on” your browsers that helps you to surf the internet more easily and efficiently, thus, improve your productivity. Enjoy!

1. Awesome Screenshot

feature-annotate

    Awesome screenshot helps you to capture the whole web page. You can choose any portion of a a page, annotate the captured area with different shapes, arrows lines or even add text onto it. This chrome extension is simple and easy. It does exactly what it says; no more, less.

    2. Pocket

    pocket

       

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      When you find something interesting on the Internet that you wish to save to read later, Pocket is the chrome extension for you. Pocket automatically syncs to your mobile devices, tablet or computer so that you can read your saved articles at any time. Pocket also allows off-line access, you can access your saved articles without any internet connection.

      3. Search by Image (by Google)

      search by image

        Search by Image extension give your the ability to initiate a Google Image Search using any image found in the Internet. This is a must-have extension if you search images on the web frequently.

        4. Adblock for YouTube

        adblock

          Are you sick of the annoying in-video adverts when you are watching a video on YouTube?Try Adblock for YouTube which can remove any ad videos shown before any videos. Time to say goodbye to the video ad.

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          5. FlashBlock

          Flashblock

            Most of the Flash content on the web increases your computer memory usage and CPU cycles causing your computer to chug along slowly. FlashBlock automatically blocks all flash content on a webpage which can avoids Flash from slowly hogging all of your computer memory (which eventually slows down your computer when you free memory is low).

            6. LastPass

            lastpass

              LastPass is a free password manager. It can help you to save passwords from  most of the web pages in the web. When you log into any website in the Internet, LastPass can save your password automatically. LastPass makes your web browsing easier and more secure. If you use a lot of random passwords in the web, LastPass is the best vault to store them.

              7. Feedly

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              feedly

                Feedly proves that RSS readers can be simple and stylish. Feedly transforms your Google Reader into a magazine-like start page. Google Reader takes too much time to go through all the new items whereas Feedly provides you with a high-level view of your news which means you can spend less time reading articles which are less relevant to you.

                8. Hover Zoom

                hover zoom

                  There are so many websites that use small thumbnails in order to reduce loading times such as 4chan, Facebook, Flickr, Google images. By installing Hover Zoom, it allows you to enlarge thumbnails automatically on mouse over. The image will automatically resize if it doesn’t fit into your browser window.

                  9. WOT Safe Search

                  WOT Safe search

                     

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                    Have your ever found a website that you were not sure whether you could trust it? With WOT Safe Search, you can search website freely without any concerns. WOT Safe Search also blocks all untrustworthy sites. WOT provides green, yellow and red icons for you to identify the reputation of certain websites.

                    10. Summer

                    summer

                       

                      Summer enriches web content by adding a visual and social layer onto existing web content. It makes it easy to get informative introductions about people, companies or trendy topics without the need to search from Wikipedia. Summer makes surfing much more efficient and fun.

                       

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                      Brian Lee

                      Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

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                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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