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Do You Have a Big Mission?

Do You Have a Big Mission?

“In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists.” ~Eric Hoffer

People get up every day and go to work. They do their assigned tasks, collect their pay, and head on home. Tomorrow, they will do the same. For most folks, this is just a routine that keeps food on the table.

But for an elite few, something else is driving them. They look to make a difference by what they do, and they choose what they do based on what will have an impact. They may, at times, forgo pay to make this happen, although making it happen may actually result in very great financial reward.

What we have here is the difference between having a job and having a mission.

Why Have a Mission?

A mission spares you from expending yourself all over the place just doing things. It focuses you on BEING. You are moved to take on inspired action in support of your mission, and you stop wasting your time, effort, and resources on anything that doesn’t. It stops all the confusion and frustration.

When your mission is big and clear, you have staying power and don’t feel compelled to give up easily. You don’t have to make it on mere willpower because the mission is compelling to you.

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Your mission makes for a compelling story for others, too. People are drawn to you because of what they see in you, and that connection makes it feel right to work with you.

Is a Mission of My Own Really Necessary?

You may be wondering if you really need a mission. After all, you may just want to have a job that takes care of you and your family or to do a little good in the world.

You may already be associated with an organization. You may be thinking that they have a mission and that it should be good enough for you.

But without a vision of your own, something happens along the way. You feel unfocused and undirected. You find yourself doing, doing, doing, but nothing ever seems to get done. Things aren’t closing or opening.

You may have chosen to work in a particular organization because you found their mission compelling. Their mission inspired you, and you wanted to be a part of it. You are even happy to share their mission with others.

But it’s not yours.

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So ask yourself these questions:

What do I want to do that is big?
What do I want to do for my community?
What do I want to do in this world?
What is it that really gets me going?
What is it that wakes me up early on Monday morning?

There is no getting around answering these questions if you want to touch a lot of lives and make a big impact. You need something bigger than yourself.

Your mission is like a prerequisite since it comes before everything else that you intend to create.

What Exactly Is a Mission?

A mission boils down to this: what is it that you want to do that is bigger than yourself? What makes another person want to engage with you? Even more importantly, what makes you happy to serve others?

The answers to these questions provides you with focus and clarity. They make everything flow: every conversation, every opportunity, and every connection.

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You get to discover who you really are.

People lose their own way when they just buy into someone else’s mission or even an organization’s mission. What ends up happening is that they promote that “other” mission and then forget how or even if it connects to them.

Getting a Mission of Your Very Own

Okay, we have established the importance of having a big mission. So how do you get one?

There are four steps. Each is important, and they must be approached in order. Follow this blueprint and you can build a big mission that will energize you and inspire others.

The first step is to give birth to your DREAM. Your dream keeps you connected emotionally.

Once you have a dream, you can now funnel your passion or DRIVE into it. Drive keeps it alive.

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Once your dream is energized, it needs structure. A dream without structure is just a fantasy, but a dream with structure is your VISION. This is where you apply the laws of physics, economics, and human nature to your dream to turn it into something real.

Finally, you need a means to bring your vision to the world. That means is your VEHICLE. The vehicle might be something as organized as a business or as organic as a movement.

When you bring together DREAM, DRIVE, VISION, and VEHICLE, you have a mission.

Make It Big

Your mission may not be as big as world peace or the end of poverty. But whatever it is, it will be big for you. How big it feels is how you will determine whether or not it is worthy of you.

Starting a community garden may be big for you. Running for president may be big for you. It is yours to choose.

This is not the time to hold back. A mission will be larger than you. That is one of its best characteristics. Make it something you are proud to be associated with. Honor your big mission and it will honor you.

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Last Updated on September 30, 2020

Effective vs Efficient: What’s the Difference Regarding Productivity?

Effective vs Efficient: What’s the Difference Regarding Productivity?

When it comes to being effective vs efficient, there are a lot of similarities, and because of this, they’re often misused and misinterpreted, both in daily use and application.

Every business should look for new ways to improve employee effectiveness and efficiency to save time and energy in the long term. Just because a company or employee has one, however, doesn’t necessarily mean that the other is equally present.

Utilizing both an effective and efficient methodology in nearly any capacity of work and life will yield high levels of productivity, while a lack of it will lead to a lack of positive results.

Before we discuss the various nuances between the word effective and efficient and how they factor into productivity, let’s break things down with a definition of their terms.

Effective vs Efficient

Effective is defined as “producing a decided, decisive, or desired effect.” Meanwhile, the word “efficient ” is defined as “capable of producing desired results with little or no waste (as of time or materials).”[1]

A rather simple way of explaining the differences between the two would be to consider a light bulb. Say that your porch light burned out and you decided that you wanted to replace the incandescent light bulb outside with an LED one. Either light bulb would be effective in accomplishing the goal of providing you with light at night, but the LED one would use less energy and therefore be the more efficient choice.

Now, if you incorrectly set a timer for the light, and it was turned on throughout the entire day, then you would be wasting energy. While the bulb is still performing the task of creating light in an efficient manner, it’s on during the wrong time of day and therefore not effective.

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The effective way is focused on accomplishing the goal, while the efficient method is focused on the best way of accomplishing the goal.

Whether we’re talking about a method, employee, or business, the subject in question can be either effective or efficient, or, in rare instances, they can be both.

When it comes to effective vs efficient, the goal of achieving maximum productivity is going to be a combination where the subject is effective and as efficient as possible in doing so.

Effectiveness in Success and Productivity

Being effective vs efficient is all about doing something that brings about the desired intent or effect[2]. If a pest control company is hired to rid a building’s infestation, and they employ “method A” and successfully completed the job, they’ve been effective at achieving the task.

The task was performed correctly, to the extent that the pest control company did what they were hired to do. As for how efficient “method A” was in completing the task, that’s another story.

If the pest control company took longer than expected to complete the job and used more resources than needed, then their efficiency in completing the task wasn’t particularly good. The client may feel that even though the job was completed, the value in the service wasn’t up to par.

When assessing the effectiveness of any business strategy, it’s wise to ask certain questions before moving forward:

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  • Has a target solution to the problem been identified?
  • What is the ideal response time for achieving the goal?
  • Does the cost balance out with the benefit?

Looking at these questions, a leader should ask to what extent a method, tool, or resource meets the above criteria and achieve the desired effect. If the subject in question doesn’t hit any of these marks, then productivity will likely suffer.

Efficiency in Success and Productivity

Efficiency is going to account for the resources and materials used in relation to the value of achieving the desired effect. Money, people, inventory, and (perhaps most importantly) time, all factor into the equation.

When it comes to being effective vs efficient, efficiency can be measured in numerous ways[3]. In general, the business that uses fewer materials or that is able to save time is going to be more efficient and have an advantage over the competition. This is assuming that they’re also effective, of course.

Consider a sales team for example. Let’s say that a company’s sales team is tasked with making 100 calls a week and that the members of that team are hitting their goal each week without any struggle.

The members on the sales team are effective in hitting their goal. However, the question of efficiency comes into play when management looks at how many of those calls turn into solid connections and closed deals.

If less than 10 percent of those calls generate a connection, the productivity is relatively low because the efficiency is not adequately balancing out with the effect. Management can either keep the same strategy or take a new approach.

Perhaps they break up their sales team with certain members handling different parts of the sales process, or they explore a better way of connecting with their customers through a communications company.

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The goal is ultimately going to be finding the right balance, where they’re being efficient with the resources they have to maximize their sales goals without stretching themselves too thin. Finding this balance is often easier said than done, but it’s incredibly important for any business that is going to thrive.

Combining Efficiency and Effectiveness to Maximize Productivity

Being effective vs efficient works best if both are pulled together for the best results.

If a business is ineffective in accomplishing its overall goal, and the customer doesn’t feel that the service is equated with the cost, then efficiency becomes largely irrelevant. The business may be speedy and use minimal resources, but they struggle to be effective. This may put them at risk of going under.

It’s for this reason that it’s best to shoot for being effective first, and then work on bringing efficiency into practice.

Improving productivity starts with taking the initiative to look at how effective a company, employee, or method is through performance reviews. Leaders should make a point to regularly examine performance at all levels on a whole, and take into account the results that are being generated.

Businesses and employees often succumb to inefficiency because they don’t look for a better way, or they lack the proper tools to be effective in the most efficient manner possible.

Similar to improving a manager or employee’s level of effectiveness, regularly measuring the resources needed to obtain the desired effect will ensure that efficiency is being accounted for. This involves everything from keeping track of inventory and expenses, to how communication is handled within an organization.

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By putting in place a baseline value for key metrics and checking them once changes have been made, a company will have a much better idea of the results they’re generating.

It’s no doubt a step-by-step process. By making concentrated efforts, weakness can be identified and rectified sooner rather than later when the damage is already done.

Bottom Line

Understanding the differences between being effective vs efficient is key when it comes to maximizing productivity. It’s simply working smart so that the intended results are achieved in the best way possible. Finding the optimal balance should be the ultimate goal for employees and businesses:

  • Take the steps that result in meeting the solution.
  • Review the process and figure out how to do it better.
  • Repeat the process with what has been learned in a more efficient manner.

And just like that, effective and efficient productivity is maximized.

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Featured photo credit: Tim van der Kuip via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Merriam-Webster: effective and efficient
[2] Mind Tools: Being Effective at Work
[3] Inc.: 8 Things Really Efficient People Do

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