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Why You Should Quit Multi-Tasking Now

Why You Should Quit Multi-Tasking Now

In our very busy lives, there’s always a temptation to do too much at once. We have to recognize, though, the multi-tasking downsides that make splitting our attention a fruitless endeavor. Here are ten of the biggest multi-tasking downsides that demonstrate why we should do things one at a time.

1. Multi-Tasking Will Not Mean That You’re Simultaneously Doing Multiple Tasks

First, let’s get the concept of “multi-tasking” straight. You’re not actually doing two (or more) things at once. That’s essentially impossible. Guy Winch, PhD, author of Emotional First Aid: Practical Strategies for Treating Failure, Rejection, Guilt and Other Everyday Psychological Injuries, compared our attention to a pie chart. What you’re working on takes up the majority of the pie, with only small slices left over for things you do automatically like breathing. What you’re calling multi-tasking is actually just shifting between tasks at a rapid pace. Getting into different headspaces takes energy, too, so ultimately…

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2. Multi-Tasking Will Actually Waste Time

It will take longer for a driver to reach a destination if they’re constantly fiddling with the radio. Likewise, being distracted by a small task while working on a big task will eat up more time than you’re saving. To avoid multi-tasking downsides like this, you have to just suck it up and fulfill your responsibilities one at a time.

3. Multi-Tasking Will Cause You To Make More Mistakes

You know this already, but this is one of the multi-tasking downsides that bears repeating. If your mind is divided between several tasks, your mistakes will multiply. Ask yourself if you can afford to make those mistakes. If you can’t, give each activity your full attention separately.

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4. Multi-Tasking Will Hurt Your Memory

A 2011 study by the University of California San Francisco suggests that quickly shifting from one task to another will impact your short term memory negatively. This becomes more and more apparent as you get older.

5. Multi-Tasking Will Inhibit Your Creativity

If you’ve devoted your attention to too many tasks at once, you don’t have enough working memory left to think up things that are truly creative. At best, you’ll get your assignments done in a workman-like fashion. This is one of the multi-tasking downsides you should be most aware of. If you multi-task, understand that your output will rarely rise above satisfactory.

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6. Multi-Tasking Will Cause Anxiety

I can personally attest to this one. One of the major multi-tasking downsides is the way you start feeling unsettled when you divide your attention. The University of California, Irvine, did a test that measured the heart rates of employees with and without access to office email. Those with access to their emails remained wired up, with higher heart rates, whereas those without it were comparatively stress-free. Would you like to be stress-free? Then stop multi-tasking.

7. Multi-Tasking Will Lower Your IQ

Multi-tasking downsides can include some serious long term consequences. A study at the University of London tested IQs and found that people who multi-tasked suffered similar cognitive deficiencies as people who smoked marijuana or stayed up all night.

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8. Multi-Tasking Will Stop You From Processing

You may be able to read an article while watching TV, but you probably won’t remember the contents of that article in five minutes. The same principle even holds true for eating; if you ate while doing something else your body might not recognize that you’ve been fed, causing you to eat unnecessarily. It’s amazing how varied the multi-tasking downsides are.

9. Multi-Tasking Will Have Potentially Dangerous Consequences

Some forms of multi-tasking are not only detrimental, but could actually be dangerous. For example: texting while driving. Getting back to someone a few minutes sooner isn’t worth your life or someone else’s. When multi-tasking downsides are potentially lethal, avoid the splitting of your attention.

10. Multi-Tasking Will Stop You From Really Living

If you’re playing with your phone the entire day instead of interacting or just enjoying your surroundings, you’re not truly living. We get caught up in technology and forget to actually participate in society. If that sentence describes you, then change your ways. Stop multi-tasking!

Featured photo credit: close up multitasking man using tablet, laptop and cellphone connecting wifi in the city street urban via shutterstock.com

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Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

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2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

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4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

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6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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