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Why Clarity Improves Productivity

Why Clarity Improves Productivity

Although it can be quite an entertaining mental exercise, thinking in terms of subjective view points has the extreme potential of causing unnecessary confusion. One party of a productivity team may contend that a definition of an important task is exactly what it is – while another party may go on to explain how the task is different to him (according to his background and beliefs) and as a result, may be entirely something else to others. When we’re trying to accomplish a goal, this type of foolishness and personal “re-defining” of important tasks can’t be tolerated especially in environments that depend on deadlines. Constantly re-defining what has been generally accepted by the masses is simply a waste of time – nothing can be accomplished if we’re stuck in a stage of defining things instead of acting on them. Let a fact be a fact and work to transform those facts into something meaningful and task-fulfilling.

In certain circumstances, subjective view points can become nothing but absurd in the sense that when they are improperly used, they can and will depart from what everyone expects. If these subjective view points are accepted and executed in a manner that reflects their implied meaning, they carry the danger of being perceived as “stupid” or they end up having no real meaning at all. That’s why it’s important that you use key concepts in a manner that they were intended to mean and that won’t contradict you or themselves.

Once you’ve committed to eliminating subjective view points from your project, you must also commit to eliminating them so that your present and future efforts remain consistent. Consistency is just as important as clarity and when implemented on a regular basis, as it instills trust from everyone involved. Often, our success depends upon the trust of others and enables us to stay focused on tasks that are most important. The danger in not remaining committed to eliminating subjective view points and not being consistent about it – is that you run the risk of appearing unprofessional, uncaring, or completely inept to perform a job.

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This is not to suggest however, that subjective view points don’t have a place in life – it merely points out how they can delay productivity for those of us who must deal with fact-based tasks. Leave subjective view points for the poets and the artists. Your reputation after all, just may depend upon the successful and meaningful representation of key concepts – not their creative applications.

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Nicole Miller is a developer and member of the Association of Shareware Professionals.

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Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

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