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What’s Your List Type?

What’s Your List Type?
List

    Like a lot of productivity geeks, I love lists. Lists are what keep us sane during those crazy project filled days (or keep us from doing any real work). Just google “make a list for productivity” and check out the results.

    One thing I’ve found interesting is that most folks tend to fall into 4 distinct types of list makers. Now, like most type profiles, there is some overlap, and some have more than one. But a few months back, I began keeping an eye on how different people make lists. What I found is that the real productivity boost comes from identifying what type of list you prefer, and using it to your advantage.

    For example, I know a lot of people who love mind-mapping. But I hate it. I know, that’s blasphemy to some, but it just doesn’t work for me. I’ve struggled for years to make it work. As an artist, it just made sense that mind-mapping would be my preferred way of capturing information. Conversely, I worked with a very detailed, analytic type guy who loved mind-mapping. Every other area of his life was very rigid and straight-laced. But when he made notes, his mind-maps were a thing of beauty. Controlled chaos you might say.

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    So I began taking a look at how different people make lists, and how they fall into 4 broad categories – lister, mapper, clumper, and jotter. Now keep in mind, there is nothing scientific about this. It’s based solely on my own observations. But every person I’ve worked with and applied a list type to found that it fit them – and that they had always been that way.

    The Lister

    The most common type is the straight list down the page – the lister. Bullets or checkboxes may vary, but listers usually prefer an orderly grocery-list style.

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    The Mapper

    Mind-maps are a very popular style of capturing and organizing information. Some strict mind-mappers wouldn’t even consider them a list. But the basic elements are there – organized information, put in a format to easy digest.

    The Clumper

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    Similar to a map style, a clumper tends to put info all over the page, with specific groupings. Notes on one topic in one area, to-dos in another, but all set out in clearly defined “clumps” throughout the page.

    The Jotter

    Jotters tend to just throw info on a page in no easily discernible order. But being a jotter myself, I know that there is some order to the randomness (a paradox, you could say). Jotters like the undefined structure, which allows for lots of different types of information to be captured at once.

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    And You?

    Which type best fits you? Do you have a list style that you’ve had most of your life, or have you grown and changed over the years? Just like any type exercise, knowing the basic archetype of our habits and work-style is extremely valuable in helping us be more productive. By learning something as simple as how you prefer to make lists, you can save a bunch of time messing around with things that don’t work. Then the next time some smart-ass says “you know, you really should mind-map your notes,” you can tell them “no, thanks, I’m a clumper.” Then don’t tell them what it means. Because a confused smart-ass is a fun thing to watch.

    Tony D. Clark writes, draws cartoons, designs software and websites, and spends a lot of time talking others into working from home, being creative, and doing what they love. His blog Success from the Nest focuses on helping parents who want to do meaningful work from home and have more time for their families, and their dreams.

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    Leon Ho

    Founder of Lifehack

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    Last Updated on May 24, 2019

    How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

    How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

    If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

    Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

    1. Create a Good Morning Routine

    One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

    CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

    You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

    If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

    The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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    2. Prioritize

    Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

    Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

      If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

      Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

      How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

      3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

      One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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      Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

      Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

      Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

      And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

      4. Take Breaks

      Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

      To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

      After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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      I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

      5. Manage Your Time Effectively

      A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

      How do you know when exactly you have free time?

      By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

      With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

      Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

      A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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      20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

      6. Celebrate and Reflect

      No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

      Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

      Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

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      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

      Reference

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