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What Yoga Can Teach Us About Productivity

What Yoga Can Teach Us About Productivity

    Earlier, I talked about how you can use meditation practices “in real time,” while you’re working on a task, to stay focused and motivated.  In this post, I’ll discuss how some forms of movement and breathing from yoga can help you find efficiency and ease in your work.

    Usually, when we think about productivity, images of well-organized e-mail inboxes and color-coded folders come to mind.  But these things alone aren’t enough to make us efficient.  If our minds aren’t disciplined — our attention is scattered, or we feel sluggish or anxious — work will be a struggle, no matter how organized our workspace is.

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    How do we discipline our minds?  I’ve found the ancient practice of hatha yoga — the stretches and breathing we simply call “yoga” in the West — very helpful.  This may sound odd at first, but it makes sense if we look at why hatha yoga was created.  It’s designed to clear the mind to prepare for meditation. In the same way, when we use it at work, it helps us become serene and focused.

    Although people tend to see yoga as a complex bunch of poses that require a mat and a lot of flexibility, there are simple forms of yogic breathing and movement we can do while seated. You can do the practices I’ll describe whenever you feel yourself losing attention or momentum at work.

    1.    Breathe Into The Tight Spot

    When a student is in a yoga pose that’s bringing up a lot of discomfort, a yoga teacher will often tell the student to “breathe into” the uncomfortable spot in their body — meaning to breathe so that the tense part rises and falls with the breath. This helps the student relax into the pose.

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    If you pay close enough attention when you’re feeling stressed or anxious at work, I suspect you’ll notice that some part of your body is tensed up — whether it’s your jaw, neck, lower back, or somewhere else.  If you notice this, I invite you to try taking a few deep breaths into that tight place.

    When you do this, I think you’ll find the tension dissipating, and the stress starting to fade.

    2.    Open Up Your Shoulders

    Many of us spend our workdays hunched over a keyboard, and this can cause tension to build in the neck and shoulders.  When that tightness gets uncomfortable enough, it can disrupt our focus.  Here’s a great way to release some of this tension — again, without leaving your chair.

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    The pose I’ll describe is called “eagle arms.”  To do this, hold your forearms out in front of you, parallel to your body.  Cross your right arm in front of your left, and clasp your hands in front of your face so that your arms intertwine.  Holding this pose, breathe deeply a few times into your shoulders.  Repeat this with your left arm crossed over your right.

    I think you’ll find this helps you let go of the tightness in your shoulders, and return your attention to your work.

    3.    Breathe Into Your Heart

    When we’re feeling unmotivated at work, it’s helpful to connect with our desire to contribute to and serve others. The yoga technique of breathing into your heart is a wonderful way to do this.

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    According to yoga, there’s an energetic center in the heart area called the “heart chakra.”  When we “open” the heart chakra by breathing into it, we feel our sense of compassion for others, and our desire to give to the world.

    To breathe into your heart, clasp your hands behind your back at the level of your heart, and stretch out your arms.  Then, breathe deeply so your upper chest rises and falls with the breath. Feel the warmth and openness in your heart, and notice any tension melting away.

    4.    Breathe Into Your Spine

    According to yoga, there’s another energetic center at the base of the spine called the “root chakra.”  Breathing into the root chakra gives us a sense of groundedness and stability.  Doing this can be very useful when you’re feeling anxious at work.

    To breathe into the root chakra, put your attention on the base of your spine, where the spine meets the pelvis.  If focusing on that area is difficult, place your hand on your lower back, and concentrate on the sensation of pressure there.  With your attention on the base of your spine, take a few deep breaths.

    When you do this, you’ll likely feel a deep-seated sense of solidity, and that paralyzing worry will start to fade.

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    Last Updated on May 24, 2019

    How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

    How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

    If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

    Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

    1. Create a Good Morning Routine

    One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

    CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

    You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

    If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

    The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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    2. Prioritize

    Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

    Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

      If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

      Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

      How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

      3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

      One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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      Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

      Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

      Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

      And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

      4. Take Breaks

      Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

      To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

      After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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      I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

      5. Manage Your Time Effectively

      A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

      How do you know when exactly you have free time?

      By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

      With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

      Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

      A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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      20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

      6. Celebrate and Reflect

      No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

      Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

      Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

      More Articles About Daily Productivity

      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

      Reference

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