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These Hotel Perks Are Worth Every Penny

These Hotel Perks Are Worth Every Penny

Most people love to take a relaxing holiday break when life gets stressful. Hotels offer a relaxing environment where you can relax, eat and swim to your heart’s content. But do you know about the best and most expensive hotel perks out there?

From a hangover service to a pet psychic, we check out 15 of the coolest hotel perks available.

1. NASA Designed Space Pillows, The Benjamin Hotel, New York

Pillow Menu

    If you take your sleep seriously, this hotel perk is perfect for you. The hotel provides guests with a pillow menu, including a pillow designed by NASA and a five foot body cushion.

    Price: Available to all overnight guests, with room priced from $500 per night.

    2. Arrive By Paraglide At The Six Senses Hideaway, Zighy Bay, Oman

    There are three different arrival options at The Six Senses Hideaway – you can take a drive there in a 4×4, or take a scenic boat route. However, nothing compares to the third choice; you can choose to paraglide your way to the hotel with a professional. The ultimate arrival experience!

    Price: $183 per person.

    3. Super Cars At The Four Seasons, Beverly Hills

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    Super Car

      The Four Seasons in Beverly Hills is a car lover’s dream; anyone who stays in the Hotel’s new suites gets free access to some amazing cars, including Roll Royces, Ferraris, Bentleys and Lamborghinis.

      Price: Exclusively available to guests who book suites. Premier suites priced at over $19,000 per week.

      4. The Sunshine Butler At The Club And Hotel Spa, Jersey

      The Sunshine Butler

        If you love to spend your holidays relaxing on a sun lounger, this holiday perk is perfect for you. The Sunshine Butler will tend to all of your needs, from polishing your sunglasses, misting your face and applying sun cream – luxurious!

        Price: Exclusively available to guests who stay in the master suite, priced from $345 per night.

        5. Goldfish For The Day At Kimpton Hotels And Restaurants, America

        Rent A Goldfish

          This hotel is more than just pet friendly – you can also rent goldfish by the day if you’re feeling particularly lonely.

          Price: Available to all guests, rooms priced from $308 per night.

          6. Complimentary Fender Guitars At The Hard Rock, Chicago

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          Fender Guitar

            If you play the guitar, you will love the hotel perk offered at The Hard Rock. They offer 20 different types of Fender guitars that you can have brought to your room for you to use. On top of that, you can have all the extras for free, from amps to video lessons to headphones!

            Price: Available to all guests, single room prices from $750 for 3 nights.

            7. Owls Delivering Rings At The Ashford Castle Hotel, Ireland

            Ring Delivering Owls

              If you’re looking to suprise your partner with the perfect proposal, look no further than the Ashford Castle Hotel. You can arrange to have the Hotel’s resident owl Dingle to deliver an engagement ring to whereever you are – the most romantic holiday perk we could find!

              Price: 3 day Proposal Package, priced from $2,356.

              8. Pet Psychic At Hotel Monaco, Portland

              Pet Psychic

                If you like to travel with your pets, Hotel Monaco has the best hotel perk for you. All pets can stay for free, regardless of size or weight. Even better – if you are worried about the emotional state of your pet, you can book them in for a session with pet psychic Bridget Pilloud.

                Price: Available to guests as an add-on package. Rooms priced from $481 per night.

                9. Wedding Design Studio At The Ritz Carlton, Tianjin

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                Wedding Design Studio

                  You can have the perfect wedding at the beautiful Ritz Carlton, which offers a beautiful venue and horse drawn carriage rides, as well as the option of a Rolls Royce!

                  Price: 30 minute horse-drawn carriage ride priced at $8,100.

                  10. Manta Ray Hot Phone At Four Seasons, The Maldives

                  Manta Ray Hot Phone

                    Guests who stay at the Four Seasons in the Maldives have the option to sign up for the Manta call service, where the resort lets the guests know whenever Manta Rays have been spotted. They then get collected from wherever there are, and whisked away to snorkle with Manta Rays. A great holiday perk for anyone who is interested in the ocean!

                    Price: Available to all overnight guests, rooms priced from $2,900 per night.

                    11. Soap Concierge At Viceroy Riviera Maya, Playa del Carmen

                    Soap Concierge

                      This hotel has high standards of cleaniless; guests can order bespoke soaps from a menu dedicated entirely to soap. You can request almost any kind of handcrafted soap, from scented to exfoliating, to make sure you feel squeaky clean.

                      Price: Available to all guests, rooms priced from $605 per night.

                      12. Hangover Concierge At The Ritz Carlton, New Orleans

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                      Hangover Servie

                        This holiday perk is perfect for anyone who plans on getting drunk while they are vacationing. The Ritz Carlton offers a Recovery Concierge, which offers a selection of different hangover remedies to Club Level guests, including a hair of the dog cocktail!

                        Price: Available to guests who stay in the Ritz Carlton suite, available from $5,947 per night.

                        13.Vitamin C-Infused Shower At MGM Grand, Las Vegas

                        Vitamin C Infused Shower

                          The MGM grand offers many interesting hotel perks, but one of the most unique is the vitamin C infused shower. It is believed the vitamin C neutralizes the chlorine in the water for a more natural experience.

                          Price: Available to guests as part of a $30 per night upgrade package.

                          14. Water Library At Trump Hotel, Chicago

                          Water Library

                            If you can taste the difference when it comes to water, you may want to experience the Water Library at the Trump Hotel. Offering up different types of water, you can chose water from natural springs, or a sommelier-crafted Beverly Hills option.

                            Price: Bottles vary between $10-$25.

                            15. Aura Reading, Mii Amo, Sedona

                            Aura Reading

                              Mii Amo offers various aura readings to guests at their hotel. They can chose from an Aura-Soma Color Reading or a relaxing Psychic Massage.

                              Price: 60 minutes for $250.

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                              Amy Johnson

                              Amy is a writer who blogs about relationships and lifestyle advice.

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                              Last Updated on October 15, 2019

                              Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                              Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                              Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

                              Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

                              There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

                              Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

                              Why we procrastinate after all

                              We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

                              Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

                              Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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                              To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

                              If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

                              So, is procrastination bad?

                              Yes it is.

                              Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

                              Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

                              Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

                              It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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                              The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

                              Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

                              For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

                              A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

                              Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

                              Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

                              How bad procrastination can be

                              Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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                              After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

                              One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

                              That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

                              Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

                              In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

                              You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

                              More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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                              8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

                              Procrastination, a technical failure

                              Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

                              It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

                              It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

                              Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

                              Reference

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