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These 40 Invaded Photos Will Surely Blow Your Mind

These 40 Invaded Photos Will Surely Blow Your Mind

When you open your Instagram app, what sort of photos do you expect to see? Pictures of people’s morning coffee and favorite meals? Selfies at parties and the day’s outfit? If you’re lucky, you may even get a beautiful skyline but, and let’s be honest here, Instagram photos are beginning to become a little bit similar and often lack originality. Thankfully, that’s where Brazilian Illustrator, filmmaker and photographer Lucas Levitan steps in.

Currently based in London, Levitan takes other people’s everyday Instagram posts and adds humorous, silly cartoons before posting them on his own Instagram account where he’s already posted over 600 pictures. Not only do these doodles make the images more interesting, they often add a meaningful narrative.  “I search for inspiration in everyday life,” says Levitan, “and turn ordinary objects and scenes into intriguing images that sometimes take shape as illustration, sculptures, installations, paintings or films”

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This particular series of images is cheekily named Photo Invasion as he uses other people’s photos and invades them without asking permission. However, Levitan is always sure to tag and mention the original photo’s owner. On Photo Invasion, Levitan states “I try to create a partnership with my drawing and the other photograph. It’s never the intention is taking over, but building a new story, together.”

Take a look at these wonderfully invaded photos! Some will make you think, some may not be safe for work and some have a bit of illustrated gore:

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1. Get The Flick Off Of That Cliff Edge!

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    2. A Little Bit Awkward.
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      3. Squirrel Selfie.
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        4. Summer Cleaning.
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          5. Lumber-Hack
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            6. Ice Fishing
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              7. 100 MPH Knitting.
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                Levitan Around The World

                Levitan’s work has featured in exhibitions around the world, from the Tropicalia at Barbican Art Centre in the UK to the Chicago Museum of Modern Art in the USA and the Panorama of Brazilian Art at the Museum of Modern Art in Brazil. He has also been awarded over a dozen awards including Best Integrated Campaign 2011 at the Revolution Awards and bronze in Promo & Activation at the Dubai Lynx (Cannes Lion) 2011.

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                In the future, Levitan hopes to display his art throughout London in an exhibition named Art No Cube so that his art will finally be able to invade the physical realms as well the digital.

                8. London Weather.
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                  9. The Bass Bridge.
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                    10. This Guy Is Tripping.
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                      11. Welcome To The Cutting Edge City.
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                        12. The Instant Wrinkle Cure Is Finally Here.
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                          13. A True Beach Romance… Or Circus Act.
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                            14. Fun At The Museum.
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                              15. Harvesting.
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                                16. Got Milk?
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                                  17. Extreme Jenga.
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                                    18. Hide And Seek.
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                                      19. London Explained: The First Pidgeon Clock.
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                                        20. Teachers These Days… 
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                                          21. Relaxing By The Pool Side.
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                                            22. American Chess.
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                                              23. Architecture At It’s Finest.
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                                                24. Traffic Stopper.
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                                                  Never Stop Being Silly

                                                   “For me it’s a playful way to celebrate photography, apart of admiring the image itself, I look for a new story hidden on it,” Levitan writes on his Tumblr. “That way I create a new narrative and an unexpected partnership with the photographer.”

                                                  Levitan is a prime example of how we can use any resources we are given to create art and inspire creativity in others. Never, ever top being silly and spreading joy!

                                                  25. Disclaimer: Not Responsible For Any Injuries That Occur During Tickling. 
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                                                    26. Hanging Out Or Falling Down?
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                                                      27. Nelson’s Jumping From His Column.
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                                                        28. Foot Climbing.
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                                                          29. Continue To Grow.
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                                                            30. Music Box Ballerina Comes To Life. 
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                                                              31. Northern Seal.
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                                                                32. Strength Level 9000: The Ultimate Test.

                                                                Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 21.55.47.png 33. Famous.Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 21.56.00.png

                                                                  34. All Air.
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                                                                    35. How To: Get An Even Tan.

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                                                                      36. Abbey Road Zebra Crossing.
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                                                                        37. Outdoor Banquet. 
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                                                                          38. Bad Santa’s Little Helper.
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                                                                            39. Eiffel Trumpet.
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                                                                              40. Colour Rinse.
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                                                                                Which of Levitan’s photo’s is your particular favourite? Would you be happy if he took one your Instagram photos and ‘invaded’ it? To see more of his work visit his website, Tumblr, Instagram or LinkedIn.

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                                                                                Images: Lucas Levitan

                                                                                Featured photo credit: Lucas Levitan via photoinvasion.tumblr.com

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                                                                                Siobhan Harmer

                                                                                Siobhan is a passionate writer sharing about motivation and happiness tips on Lifehack.

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                                                                                1 The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain) 2 What to Do When Bored at Work (And Why You Feel Bored Actually) 3 6 Effective Ways to Enhance Your Problem Solving Skills 4 How to Concentrate and Focus Better to Boost Productivity 5 15 Productive Things to Do When Bored (So Time Is Not Wasted)

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                                                                                Last Updated on July 17, 2019

                                                                                The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

                                                                                The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

                                                                                What happens in our heads when we set goals?

                                                                                Apparently a lot more than you’d think.

                                                                                Goal setting isn’t quite so simple as deciding on the things you’d like to accomplish and working towards them.

                                                                                According to the research of psychologists, neurologists, and other scientists, setting a goal invests ourselves into the target as if we’d already accomplished it. That is, by setting something as a goal, however small or large, however near or far in the future, a part of our brain believes that desired outcome is an essential part of who we are – setting up the conditions that drive us to work towards the goals to fulfill the brain’s self-image.

                                                                                Apparently, the brain cannot distinguish between things we want and things we have. Neurologically, then, our brains treat the failure to achieve our goal the same way as it treats the loss of a valued possession. And up until the moment, the goal is achieved, we have failed to achieve it, setting up a constant tension that the brain seeks to resolve.

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                                                                                Ideally, this tension is resolved by driving us towards accomplishment. In many cases, though, the brain simply responds to the loss, causing us to feel fear, anxiety, even anguish, depending on the value of the as-yet-unattained goal.

                                                                                Love, Loss, Dopamine, and Our Dreams

                                                                                The brains functions are carried out by a stew of chemicals called neurotransmitters. You’ve probably heard of serotonin, which plays a key role in our emotional life – most of the effective anti-depressant medications on the market are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, meaning they regulate serotonin levels in the brain leading to more stable moods.

                                                                                Somewhat less well-known is another neurotransmitter, dopamine. Among other things, dopamine acts as a motivator, creating a sensation of pleasure when the brain is stimulated by achievement. Dopamine is also involved in maintaining attention – some forms of ADHD are linked to irregular responses to dopamine.[1]

                                                                                So dopamine plays a key role in keeping us focused on our goals and motivating us to attain them, rewarding our attention and achievement by elevating our mood. That is, we feel good when we work towards our goals.

                                                                                Dopamine is related to wanting – to desire. The attainment of the object of our desire releases dopamine into our brains and we feel good. Conversely, the frustration of our desires starves us of dopamine, causing anxiety and fear.

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                                                                                One of the greatest desires is romantic love – the long-lasting, “till death do us part” kind. It’s no surprise, then, that romantic love is sustained, at least in part, through the constant flow of dopamine released in the presence – real or imagined – of our true love. Loss of romantic love cuts off that supply of dopamine, which is why it feels like you’re dying – your brain responds by triggering all sorts of anxiety-related responses.

                                                                                Herein lies obsession, as we go to ever-increasing lengths in search of that dopamine reward. Stalking specialists warn against any kind of contact with a stalker, positive or negative, because any response at all triggers that reward mechanism. If you let the phone ring 50 times and finally pick up on the 51st ring to tell your stalker off, your stalker gets his or her reward, and learns that all s/he has to do is wait for the phone to ring 51 times.

                                                                                Romantic love isn’t the only kind of desire that can create this kind of dopamine addiction, though – as Captain Ahab (from Moby Dick) knew well, any suitably important goal can become an obsession once the mind has established ownership.

                                                                                The Neurology of Ownership

                                                                                Ownership turns out to be about a lot more than just legal rights. When we own something, we invest a part of ourselves into it – it becomes an extension of ourselves.

                                                                                In a famous experiment at Cornell University, researchers gave students school logo coffee mugs, and then offered to trade them chocolate bars for the mugs. Very few were willing to make the trade, no matter how much they professed to like chocolate. Big deal, right? Maybe they just really liked those mugs![2]

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                                                                                But when they reversed the experiment, handing out chocolate and then offering to trade mugs for the candy, they found that now, few students were all that interested in the mugs. Apparently the key thing about the mugs or the chocolate wasn’t whether students valued whatever they had in their possession, but simply that they had it in their possession.

                                                                                This phenomenon is called the “endowment effect”. In a nutshell, the endowment effect occurs when we take ownership of an object (or idea, or person); in becoming “ours” it becomes integrated with our sense of identity, making us reluctant to part with it (losing it is seen as a loss, which triggers that dopamine shut-off I discussed above).

                                                                                Interestingly, researchers have found that the endowment effect doesn’t require actual ownership or even possession to come into play. In fact, it’s enough to have a reasonable expectation of future possession for us to start thinking of something as a part of us – as jilted lovers, gambling losers, and 7-year olds denied a toy at the store have all experienced.

                                                                                The Upshot for Goal-Setters

                                                                                So what does all this mean for would-be achievers?

                                                                                On one hand, it’s a warning against setting unreasonable goals. The bigger the potential for positive growth a goal has, the more anxiety and stress your brain is going to create around it’s non-achievement.

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                                                                                It also suggests that the common wisdom to limit your goals to a small number of reasonable, attainable objectives is good advice. The more goals you have, the more ends your brain thinks it “owns” and therefore the more grief and fear the absence of those ends is going to cause you.

                                                                                On a more positive note, the fact that the brain rewards our attentiveness by releasing dopamine means that our brain is working with us to direct us to achievement. Paying attention to your goals feels good, encouraging us to spend more time doing it. This may be why outcome visualization — a favorite technique of self-help gurus involving imagining yourself having completed your objectives — has such a poor track record in clinical studies. It effectively tricks our brain into rewarding us for achieving our goals even though we haven’t done it yet!

                                                                                But ultimately, our brain wants us to achieve our goals, so that it’s a sense of who we are that can be fulfilled. And that’s pretty good news!

                                                                                More About Goals Setting

                                                                                Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

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