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Reinvention: It’s something you can do

Reinvention: It’s something you can do

Fourteen months after the first one, I tried to put together a Reinvention Forum with the Ho‘ohana Community of my Talking Story blog (which by the way, is a virtual community you are warmly welcomed to join into).

I’ll be frank: I had my doubts that I could pull it off, and as things do have a tendency to happen as your expectations have led them to, the entries for the forum overwhelmingly happened in the final hours before the submission deadline. But they DID happen, and we nearly tripled the articles from the first time around.

Reinvention seems to be a scary word for a lot of people; it ranks right up there with, gulp, “change.” If not scary, it’s intimidating, something you think that you could never do, for it takes someone else with a bigger, revolutionary kind of innovative idea, someone brilliant, …but surely not you. For many, reinvention implies you have to start from scratch and be an Einstein-like inventor, or be an incredibly brave idealist.

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Not true. Learning to reinvent little by little is a way of grooming your own potential for leadership initiative. Your idea doesn’t have to be completely original; we can all reinvent by putting our personal signature on an idea we love which may already exist. There is an incredible amount of unmet opportunity dormant in the wasteland of unsupported ideas which were abandoned by those who weren’t tenacious enough, or who feared making mistakes when they didn’t need to.

Sometimes we reinvent to fix an irritation. I admit this is where my own contributions to the Reinvention Forum happened with the articles I’d written on Human Resources and compensation design. Irritations become very hopeful, positive and proactive within an enthusiastic and optimistic effort to reinvent the processes associated with them. Think of the way a pearl is created around a grain of sand which has become an irritation in an oyster, or the way a talented muralist transforms a wall which previously attracted too much graffiti.

Reinvention is something we can all do. The only question is if we will.

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For me, the word reinvention is not at all intimidating. It has other connotations. An easy way to groom more creativity. The willingness not to give up on something promising, but still slightly flawed. The opportunity to collaborate with others on synergistic effort, uncovering a third alternative; not mine, not yours, but something better entirely. The triumph of our human capacity to make things matter. And as far as virtual communities go, a forum meant to be where people don’t just complain, they generously seek to offer solutions.

Visit our Reinvention Forum on Talking Story and you will see what I mean. Add your own thoughts and comments to help us flesh out our ideas. Counting this post, you have 21 different opportunities to do so. Here is a run-down of the topics you’ll find there.

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Reinventions at Work and in Business:

1. Reinventing Brainstorming at Work
2. In search of a job spec that inspires
3. Reinventing Business, Making the Transition from Advertiser to Facilitator
4. Employee Evangelism
5. Coyote and Jackalope
6. How to Kill Creativity
7. Robots R Us: Crisis in Customer Service
8. Manifesting Possibility
9. The Most Valuable 10% of your Job Description
10. Meeting Planner | Organizer | Worksheet
11. The Resistance
12. Want to be a great place to work?
13. Why do young leaders leave organizations?
14. Vaporizing Limitations
15. Information Sharing: Don’t Hoard your Knowledge
16. Passion for the Good Customer Experience: Circle Recognition
17. A Reinvention Revolution; 3 Sacred Cows to Start With
18. The Reinvention of Human Resources
19. Got a job to fill? Tell it like it is
20. Great Project to consider: A Compensation Overhaul

I fully intend to have a Reinvention Forum again. Perhaps you’ll be there as a contributing author the next time, telling us about your own reinvention success story. I hope so; there is a wealth of potential just waiting for its day in the sun, and its got your name on it.

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Articles Referenced here:
Reinventions at Work and in Business: a Ho‘ohana Community Forum
Synergy: The Third Alternative
Looking for Leadership – any ideas?
From Mistake to Marvel

Rosa Say is the author of Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business and the Talking Story blog. She is also the founder and head coach of Say Leadership Coaching, a company dedicated to bringing nobility to the working arts of management and leadership.

Rosa’s Previous Thursday Column was: And the Survey says?

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Memorize More and Faster Than Other People

How to Memorize More and Faster Than Other People

People like to joke that the only thing you really “learn” in school is how to memorize. As it turns out, that’s not even the case for most of us. If you go around the room and ask a handful of people how to memorize things quickly and how to remember things, most of them will probably tell you repetition.

That is so far from the truth, it’s running for office. If you want to memorize something quickly and thoroughly, repetition won’t cut it; however, recalling something will. The problem is that recalling something requires learning and we all learn in different ways.

So how to memorize more and faster than others?

In this article, you will learn how to master the art of recalling so that you can start memorizing a ton of data in a short amount of time.

Before you start, know your learning style

Before we start, you need to establish something: are you an auditory, visual, or experiential learner?

If you’re an auditory learner, then the most effective way for you to grasp information is by hearing it. As you can imagine, visual learners favor seeing something in order to learn it. Experiential learning types are more akin to learning from events and experiences (or, doing something with the material).

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Try out this quick quiz to find out your learning style.

Most of us are a combination of at least two of these categories but I will denote which step is most favorable to your most agreeable learning style so that you can start to memorize things quickly and efficiently.

Step 1: Preparation

To optimize your memorization session, pay close attention to which environment you choose. For most people, this means choosing an area with few distractions, though some people do thrive off of learning in public areas. Figure out what is most conducive to your learning so that you can get started.

Next, start drinking some tea. I could link you to mounds of scientific studies that confirm green tea as a natural catalyst for improving memory. Mechanically speaking, our ability to recall information comes down to the strength between neurons in our mind, which are connected by synapses. The more you exercise the synapse (repetition), the stronger it is, resulting in the ability to memorize.

As we get older, toxic chemicals will damage our neurons and synapses, leading to memory loss and even Alzheimer’s. Green tea contains compounds, however, that block this toxicity and keep your brain cells working properly a lot longer.

Step 2: Record what you’re memorizing

This is especially useful if you’re trying to memorize information from a lecture. Use a tape recorder to track all of the acquired facts being spoken and listen to it.

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If you’re trying to memorize a speech, record yourself reading the speech aloud and listen to yourself speaking. Obviously, this is most helpful for auditory learners, but it’s also handy because it ensures that you’re getting more context from a lecture that will help you learn the information faster.

Step 3: Write everything down

Before you start trying to recall everything from memory, write and re-write the information. This will help you become more familiar with what you’re trying to memorize.

Doing this while listening to your tape recorder can also help you retain a lot of the data. This is most useful for experienced learners.

Step 4: Section your notes

Now that you have everything written down in one set of notes, separate them into sections. This is ideal for visual learners, especially if you use color coding to differentiate between subjects.

This will help you break everything down and start compartmentalizing the information being recorded in your brain.

Step 5: Apply repetition to cumulative memorization

For each line of text, repeat it a few times and try to recall it without looking. As you memorize each set of text, be cumulative by adding the new information to what you’ve just learned. This will keep everything within your short-term memory from fading.

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Keep doing this until you have memorized that section and you are able to recall the entire thing. Do not move on to another section until you have memorized that one completely. This is mostly visual learning but if you are speaking aloud, then you are also applying auditory.

Step 6: Write it down from memory

Now that you can recall entire sections, write everything down from memory. This will reinforce everything you just have just learned by applying it experientially.

Step 7: Teach it to someone (or yourself)

The most effective method for me when I was in school was to teach the information to someone else. You can do this in a variety of ways. You can lecture the knowledge to someone sitting right in front of you (or the mirror, if you can’t convince anyone to sit through it) and explain everything extemporaneously.

If what you’ve learned needs to be recited verbatim, then do this in front of someone as well in order to get a feel for what it will be like to recite the text to the intended audience.

My favorite method for this is creating tests for other people. Take the information and predict what questions will come out of them. Use multiple choice, matching and so on to present the data in test format and see how someone else does.

All of this is experiential learning since you are actually practicing and manipulating the concepts you’ve learned.

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Step 8: Listen to the recordings continuously

While doing unrelated tasks like laundry or driving, go over the information again by listening to your tape recordings. This is certainly auditory learning but it will still supplement everything you’ve shoved into your short-term memory.

Step 9: Take a break

Finally, let your mind breathe. Go for a short time without thinking about what you just learned and come back to it later on.

You’ll find out what you really know and this will help you focus on the sections you might be weakest at.

Try these steps now and you will find remembering things a lot easier and you’ll memorize more stuff than a lot of other people!

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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