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My Redundant Productivity System

My Redundant Productivity System
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    Backing up your data is an essential part of digital life and protects you from losing important information. But when something goes wrong with one of your systems, it can mean you have to sift through thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of files for each project you’re involved with.

    Over the last few months, I set up a redundant productivity system. While I ensure that my data is backed up in all the traditional ways, what’s even more important to me is having redundant operational systems that mean I can keep working as if nothing happened while repairs are underway.

    For instance, if my computer fails and I’ve merely cloned my data, I have to search through Library folders for Firefox bookmarks and Address Book contacts. While you can clone a bootable drive in case a hard drive fails, sometimes system failures that don’t involve your hard drive mean that the problem is more extensive and loading up the clone is impossible. Your motherboard dying is an example of such a situation.

    My laptop has been in a repair shop for four weeks and they’re only just now “diagnosing the problem” – yet I haven’t had any issues with workflow disruption. Although as of this week I’m going to be out of the home office more often and will need something more powerful than a PDA but just as portable, a four week window without any serious kinks is pretty good running in my books.

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    It’s fairly simple to set up such a system, but it is dependent on having various bits of hardware. That said, all of my hardware is getting out of date and it still works—there’s no need to have the latest and greatest.

    Hardware Set-up

    I classify the hardware in this system in two categories: control systems, and storage solutions. This is because a back-up system only requires you to have storage solutions, but to be redundant when systems fail, you need various ways of accessing and manipulating that data.

    Control Systems

    I have a desktop (Mac mini), laptop (iBook) and a PDA phone (O2 XDA II Mini which rarely has reception). Some people can make it work with more or less, but that’s enough hardware for me to function with redundancy. Your needs will generally differ based on your line of work—a film editor will need something fancier—and your need for portability.

    I use the desktop system as the hub. This isn’t to say it’s where I do most of my work, and in fact when my laptop’s in working order I spend most of my time on that. But given its greater expandability, generally greater storage capacity and the fact you can tether a bunch of non-portable peripherals to it, like large external drives, I ensure that my data is always centralized and most up-to-date on the desktop. My PDA synchronizes with it, and so does my laptop.

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    Another good reason to use a desktop as your central hub is that the more you carry something around with you, the higher the chances are that you’ll cause damage to it. The desktop stays in one place. They are also usually peripheral driven, so when a keyboard, mouse or monitor is the problem, it’s easier to just plug another one in. My laptop’s problem is death of the keyboard and power system thanks to coffee spillage, which would’ve been easier to get around had it been my desktop keyboard that drank from the cup.

    The XDA has gotten a bit dodgy, like the last two O2 products I owned before it, so I keep an old iPaq loaded with current information and ready to go in an emergency. Overkill? Certainly. Redundancy is the point, after all.

    Storage Solutions

    While I back-up regularly, it’s far from a perfect back-up, mostly because I don’t have the cash to extend my internal and external hard drives to full capacity. For instance, OS X system folders don’t always get backed up, though system folders in the user hierarchy always are. I do my best to keep anything essential in as many places as possible. I’m a musician and this gets really hard with master recordings, which can chew up space like crazy.

    In terms of hardware, my local storage consists of two external hard drives – I have a 320GB tethered to my desktop pretty much all the time and a small 20GB that I carry around with me. Going back to the music thing (as I’m sure other professionals who deal with large project files sympathize), sometimes the 20GB struggles with Pro Tools or Logic Pro sessions, but when the price of 2.5” drives comes down it might be worth upgrading. I’m not really keen to carry the 3.5” 320GB drive with the power supply all the time!

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    Other Storage

    My own hardware is only part of the storage system. I use Gmail (and Google Docs, to a lesser extent) as a backup for critical files, and my shared hosting solution for $6.99 a month takes care of a broader range of things, both critical and non-critical. Anything that can be uploaded to the cloud in decent amounts of time is backed up this way.

    Cloud storage systems have me covered for most things under 100 megabytes.

    Software

    I’m a Mac user, so there are a few good options to keep the information necessary for redundancy backed up.

    Two of those programs come from Mark/Space, who make excellent PDA synchronization software called the Missing Sync, and SyncTogether which synchronizes information between Macs. Contacts, calendars, bookmarks, mail settings, notes and the like can be synchronized between machines using this software, and other information such as documents can be accessed through external drives, Gmail, shared hosting accounts and the like.

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    A good practice is to Gmail or FTP documents when you’re closing them, whether they are incomplete or complete. You can create FTP droplets using software like Panic Transmit to make drag-and-drop FTP backup completely painless.

    Folder Systems

    An unusual bit of advice is to employ standardized folder structures across your computers and external drives. In the vein of minimal disruption, you can continue working with drives you don’t usually use without having to adapt to wildly varying folder structures.

    This will vary based on the kind of work you do, but a balance between intuitive (both so you don’t have to think about navigation too much, and so you can set it up on new drives and machines easily), and well-organized is important. If you favor one or the other too much then moving between systems is hard.

    The advice in this article is fairly simple, but I’m surprised by the number of obsessive back-up geeks that don’t practice anything similar. With this system, even my PDA phone can fill in for a day’s work—while it might not be the most efficient way of working, systems fail all the time and having an awkward little keyboard and a stylus is much better than nothing at all.

    If you have a redundant system of your own, or improvements and suggestions for mine, let us know in the comments.

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    Joel Falconer

    Editor, content marketer, product manager and writer with 12+ years of experience in the startup, design and tech digital media industries.

    Mastering the Art of Prioritization The Importance of Scheduling Downtime How to Make Decisions Under Pressure 11 Free Mind Mapping Applications & Web Services How to Use Parkinson’s Law to Your Advantage

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    Last Updated on June 20, 2019

    50 Businesses You Can Start In Your Spare Time

    50 Businesses You Can Start In Your Spare Time

    Most people want a few more dollars in their wallets. But between an employer and family, the time most of us can devote to a second job is severely limited. Running a small side business can provide a few more options: you don’t have to show up at a set time and you can use skills you already have. Not all will be perfect for everyone, of course, and I’m sure that you’ll have a few ideas of your own after reading this list. If you’d like to share any other business ideas, please add them in the comments.

    1. Selling collectibles — From antique books to teddy bears, there are plenty of opportunities to buy and sell collectibles. It’s important to familiarize yourself with the collectible of your choice but if you choose something that you’ve been collecting for a while, you’ve got a head start.
    2. Locating apartments — It can take time to sort through apartment listings, but you can make some money by finding the perfect apartment for a renter.
    3. Baby proofing — New parents often prefer to bring in an expert to make sure their home is safe for a new baby.
    4. Calligraphic writing — If you’ve got elegant handwriting, you can pick up gigs writing or addressing wedding invitations, holiday cards and more.
    5. Selling coupons — Search on eBay for coupons right now and you’ll see thousands of listings for coupons. It’s just a matter of clipping and listing what you find in your Sunday newspaper.
    6. Pet training — A surprising number of people don’t know where to start in training a pet. Even teaching Rover simple commands like ‘Sit’ and ‘Stay’ can bring in a few dollars.
    7. Running errands — A wide variety of people want to outsource their errands, from those folks who aren’t able to leave their homes easily to those who have a busy schedule.
    8. Researching family trees — Amateur genealogists often call in experts, especially to handle research that has to be done in person in a far off place. If you’re willing to go to a local church and copy a few records, you can handle many family tree research requests.
    9. Supplying firewood — The prerequisite for selling firewood is having a source of wood; if you’ve got some land where you can cut down a few trees, you’ve got a head start.
    10. Hauling — As more people trade in their SUVs for compact cars, hauling is becoming more important: people have to rent a truck or hire a hauler for even small loads.
    11. Image consulting — Image consultants provide a wide variety of services, ranging from offering advice on appearance to teaching etiquette.
    12. Menu planning — For many people, the trip up in eating home-cooked or healthy meals is knowing what to prepare. Meal planners set a schedule to solve certain dietary problems.
    13. Microfarming — Cultivating food and flowers on small plots of land allows you to sell produce easily.
    14. Offering notary public services — Notary publics can witness and authenticate documents: a service needed for all sorts of official documents.
    15. Teaching music — If you’re skilled with a musical instrument, you can earn money by offering lessons.
    16. Mystery shopping — Mystery shoppers check the conditions and service at a store and report back to the store’s higher-ups.
    17. Offering research services — Just by reading up on a topic and compiling a report on it can earn you money.
    18. Personal shopping — Personal shoppers typically select gifts, apparel and other products for clients, helping them save time.
    19. Pet breeding — Purebred pets can be quite value, especially if you can verify their pedigree.
    20. Removing snow — During the winter months, shoveling walks can still be a reliable way to earn money. You might be asked to take care of the driveway too.
    21. Utility auditing — As people become environmentally-concious, they want to know just how efficient their homes are. With some simple testing, you can tell them.
    22. Offering web hosting services — Providing server space can be lucrative, particularly if you can provide tech support to your clients.
    23. Cutting lawns — An old standby, cutting lawns and other landscaping services can provide a second income in the summer.
    24. Auctioning items on eBay — Want to get rid of all your old stuff? Stick it up on eBay and auction it off.
    25. Babysitting — Child care of all kinds, from babysitting to nannying, can offer constant opportunities.
    26. Freelance writing — If you’ve got the skills to write clearly, you can sell your pen for everything from blogs to advertising copy.
    27. Selling blog and website themes — Do a little designing on the side? Customers that don’t want to pay full price for a website will often pay for a template or theme.
    28. Offering computer help — Particularly with people new to computers, you can earn money by providing in-home computer help.
    29. Designing websites — It may require a little skilled effort, but designing websites remains a reliable source of income.
    30. Selling stock photography — For shutterbugs, an easy way to put a photography collection to work is to post it to a stock photography site.
    31. Freelance designing — Check with local businesses: you can provide brochures, business cards and other design work and get paid a good fee.
    32. Tutoring — Math and languages reamin the easiest subjects to find tutoring gigs for, but there is demand for other fields as well.
    33. Housesitting / petsitting — Stopping in to check on a house or pet can earn you some money, and maybe even a place to stay.
    34. Building niche websites — If you can put together a site on a very specific topic, you can put targeted ads on it and make money quickly.
    35. Translating — The variety of translating work available is huge: written word, on the spot and more is easy to find even on a part-time basis.
    36. Creating custom crafts — No matter what kind of crafts you make, there’s likely a market for it. Etsy remains one of the easiest places to sell crafts.
    37. Setting up a wi-fi hotspot — With a little bit of equipment, you can set up a wi-fi hotspot and charge your neighbors for the access they’ve been ‘borrowing.’
    38. Selling an e-book — You can write an e-book about almost anything and put it up for sale online.
    39. Affiliate marketing — If you’re willing to market other companies’ products, you can earn a cut of the sales.
    40. Renting out your spare room — From looking for a long-term roommate to listing your guest room on couch surfing sites, that spare room can make you money.
    41. Offering handy man services — Handling small household tasks can provide you with plenty of work, although you’ll probably be expected to have your own tools.
    42. Teaching an online class — Share your expertise through a website, an online seminar or variety of other methods.
    43. Building furniture — For those with the skill to create handmade furniture, selling their creations is often just a matter of advertising.
    44. Providing personal chef services — Personal chefs prepare meals ahead of time for customers, leaving their customers with a full freezer and no mess.
    45. Event planning — From planning corporate events to bar mitzvahs, an event planning business can require plenty of work and offer plenty of pay.
    46. Installing home safety products — Particularly as Baby Boomers age, people able to install handrails and other home safety products are in demand.
    47. Altering / tailoring — If your sewing skills are up to par, altering garments is coming back as people try to stretch more wear out of their clothing.
    48. Offering in-home beauty services — Hair cuts, makeup and other beauty services that can be performed at home have a growing demand.
    49. Business coaching — Helping others to establish and develop their businesses can provide many opportunities to earn money.
    50. Writing resumes — Writing resumes can provide a reliable income, especially if you can put a polish on a client’s credentials.

    There are plenty of offers that claim to provide you with the opportunity to make thousands of dollars a week. Unfortunately, none of these businesses will provide that sort of income, but they aren’t scams either. They were chosen because they all require a minimum investment to get started — some require nothing more than a flyer advertising your business. Even better, if you do enjoy any of these businesses, there is a potential with most of them to continue to expand — perhaps even to the point of going full time.

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    Featured photo credit: Omar Prestwich via unsplash.com

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