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How to Get Going: 6 Tips for Improved Self-Motivation

How to Get Going: 6 Tips for Improved Self-Motivation

We all have days where we are stuck for inspiration. We get to our desks with nothing but good intentions, but somehow things don’t just flow the way we want them to.

It isn’t that we aren’t enthusiastic about what we do, or that we just can’t be bothered. We just need that little kick of motivation to get going.

Finding motivation

If you want to get things done, then the ability to motivate yourself (and, for that matter, others) is essential.

Recently I spent the day at Brands Hatch watching the British Super Bike meet. What fantastic racing (and a great spectators circuit if you haven’t been), and it really got me thinking about drive and motivation. These guys — some of them as young as 14 years old — push themselves and their bikes to the edge of their potential, race after race. And even after a nasty crash, the grid reforms…and off they go again. Surely, there are lessons here for us all.

I am always inspired by the guts, drive, and determination that these riders show. A desire to finish at the top of the podium.

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But it’s how they get there that I am most interested in.

In our businesses, we all want to be at the top. We want to be successful, and we want to realise our potential. So, when that familiar feeling of “what shall I do now” hits you, take a minute out to think things through.

Tips for improved self-motivation

Here are some of my thoughts and tips for improving your motivation, to take you from an “also ran” to the top of the podium.

1. Clarify your goals

This is one of the most important of all techniques to apply if you want to succeed. Clarify what it is that you want, and why you want it. (Unashamedly stolen from Steven Covey’s 7 Habits – Habit 2 – Begin with the end in mind).

If you don’t know what you want, then how are you going to achieve it?

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Sometimes we are stuck for motivation simply because we don’t a clear picture of the end result and, thus, the steps on the way there.

Once you have the successful outcome in your mind, you are well on your way to building the motivation to get there.

2. Think Long-Term

Thinking of the long-term is a great way to overcome the small obstacles on the way there. Often in executing a long-term strategy there are hardships on the way. By looking past these and at the long-term picture, they can often be overcome quickly and easily.

If you wait and procrastinate further, these will become harder and more difficult to get past. Think of how great it will feel to have gone past the hard stuff.  Get them done and out the way. Or, as Brian Tracy would say “Eat that Frog”.

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    3. Celebrate the small wins

    Take time to enjoy the good stuff, the small victories you experience on the way. Set some milestones for you to celebrate when you get there.

    These milestones are a great motivator in themselves, very real evidence that the long-term goal is being achieved and moved towards. Celebrating your small wins is also a  great way to renew motivation providing you with positive feedback and reinforcing your good behaviours so far.

    4. Reassess and readjust on the way

    If you keep hitting walls, maybe it’s  time to reassess the situation…and perhaps plan an alternative course. Continually coming  up against the same obstacle can be very “de-motivating”. Readjusting your strategy may well be all you need to get past and get on. After all, there’s “more than one way to skin a cat”.

    The end result is the key here. How you get there could come from a number of directions. Just because you planned one way, doesn’t mean that is the only way.

    5. Evaluate (and re-evaluate) your goals

    As you start to get closer to your end goal, take time to evaluate the outcome you are trying to achieve. It could be that once you are able to see the finishing line, it’s not actually the result you want. It may be that now that particular outcome is not as important to you as it initially was.

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    Evaluating your goals ensures that you are heading toward something that you really want. If you are lacking motivation to achieve your goal, it may well be that it just isn’t as important to you as it once was. It isn’t possible to give your best to a result you are not interested in achieving.

    6. Don’t be afraid to change direction

    If more businesses were better at this, they would be much better set to overcome the obstacles we all experience in our business lives – e.g. working through downturns and tough markets, changes in fortune and the inevitable changes in customer needs.

    Featured photo credit: Hiker on Top of Hill via Shutterstock and inline photo by Alan Light via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

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    Last Updated on November 3, 2020

    How to Use the Prioritization Matrix When Every Task is #1

    How to Use the Prioritization Matrix When Every Task is #1

    It takes being productive to get things done correctly and on time. So how do you know which tasks are essential and which can wait? The answer is in the Prioritization Matrix, also known as the Eisenhower Matrix.

    The matrix took its name after Dwight David Eisenhower.

    Eisenhower was a general in the US army and the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961. As a five-star general and a Supreme Commander in the US Army, he drafted the strategy for an Allied invasion of Europe.[1]

    Eisenhower had to make tough decisions every time about which tasks to prioritize out of many he needed to focus on daily. So, he came up with the famous Eisenhower Matrix, or the Prioritization Matrix.

    What Is the Prioritization Matrix?

    The Prioritization Matrix is a tool for rating your tasks based on urgency. It helps you know the critical activities and those tasks that you should bypass and can be useful in project management, small businesses, or personal tasks.

    Eisenhower famously said of the matrix:

    “Most tasks that are urgent are not important, and most tasks that are important are not urgent.”

    This quote became the maxim for Eisenhower in managing his time.

    There are four quadrants in the Prioritization Matrix, which help in comparing choices of what to do first and last, allowing you to prioritize projects and create strategic plan[2].

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    Eisenhower Matrix Template

      The quadrants are:

      • Do
      • Schedule
      • Delegate
      • Eliminate

      Do

      Do is the first quadrant in the Prioritization Matrix, and it incorporates important activities. That is, those tasks you need to carry out urgently — crises, deadlines, and issues that need your urgent attention and are highly relevant to your life mission.

      Hw do you know which task falls into this quadrant?

      Start by analyzing your priorities, and then establish if it falls within the ‘do it now’ criteria. If the task is achievable within a day, or within 24 to 48 hours, it’s urgent.

      Another approach you can adopt in prioritizing tasks in this category is to adopt the “eat the frog” principle by Mark Twain. This principle recommends that you do the most urgent activities as soon as you wake up.

      Here’s a practical example.

      Let’s say you need to draft a content strategy and submit a report to your manager. It’s Saturday, and the deadline for submission is Monday. Can we say the activity is urgent? Definitely!

      Schedule

      The second quadrant of the prioritization matrix is Schedule. The Prioritization Matrix classifies tasks in this category as important but not that urgent.

      They are long-term objectives and tasks with no immediate deadline. Those tasks could include meditation, journaling, studying, family time, and exercising.

      You can plan out activities in this quadrant for some other period. For instance, you should exercise for good health, but you can allocate time to do it.

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      Schedule these activities in such a way that they don’t transfer to the “Do” or “Urgent” quadrant. Ensure you have sufficient time to carry them out.

      Delegate

      The third quadrant of the prioritization matrix is Delegate.

      These tasks are not important to you but are quite urgent for others. This is where teamwork comes into play.

      You can technically perform tasks in this category, but it makes sense to delegate them. Delegating tasks will ensure you have more time to pursue activities in your first two quadrants.

      You should also monitor the tasks you have delegated. It will only amount to a sheer waste of time if you don’t have a tracking system for delegated tasks.

      Eliminate

      The last quadrant highlights your productivity killers. They are tasks that are not important to your goals and not urgent. The only way to boost your productivity is to eliminate them.

      Some examples are constantly checking your phone, watching movies, or playing video games.

      They could also be bad habits that you need to identify and delete from your daily and weekly schedule.

      Successful people have learned how to prioritize and stick to what’s important. They have learned to find a better person for a task or eliminate less significant tasks.

      Let’s consider two inspiring personalities that have designed their prioritization system.

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      Warren Buffet developed a two-list prioritization model to determine which task deserves his best attention. The bottom line is bypassing things that are important and useful but not top of the priorities.

      Mark Ford, a business advisor, marketer, self-made millionaire, and author devised his strategy:

      “Start work on the most crucial priority, take a break, work on the second most important task, take a break, then sort out the less important activities and any tasks he received from other individuals by afternoon.” [3]

      How to Use The Prioritization Matrix

      Using the Prioritization Matrix can be tricky if you’re new at it, but by following a few simple steps, you can learn to utilize it in the best way possible.

      1. List and Rank Your Priorities

      Highlight all the tasks you need to carry out in a day. Then, classify them with weighted criteria based on urgency and importance.

      Identify any activity that requires prompt action. I’m referring to a task that if you don’t complete that day, it could produce a grave consequence. For instance, if you don’t submit your content strategy, other content writers cannot work. It means you need to check for high-priority dependencies.

      2. Define the Value

      The next step is to examine the importance and assess which of them impacts your business or organization the most. As a rule of thumb, you can check which tasks possess higher priority over others. For instance, you need to attend to client’s requirements before you take care of any internal work.

      You can also estimate value by examining how the task impacts the people and customers in the organization. In a nutshell, the more impact a task has on people or the organization, the higher the priority.

      3. Take out the Most Challenging Task

      Procrastination is not a symptom of laziness, but avoidance is. The truth is that you will typically avoid tasks you don’t want to do. The former CEO of Goldman Sachs, Lloyd Blankfein, once said he would take out the most dreaded task first thing when he got to the office.

      Brian Tracy called these tasks the frogs you need to eat. That will remove the nagging dread, which mounts pressure on you when you postpone necessary tasks[4]. This is where the Prioritization Matrix can help; eat the “Do” frogs immediately.

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      If you need help overcoming procrastination, check out this article.

      4. Know What’s Important to You

      As long as you are in this cosmos, you will always encounter different choices that may be contradictory to your goals. For instance, a fantastic promotion that requires excessive travel will isolate you from important relationships. If you are not priority-conscious, you may accept it, even though your family is your priority.

      Therefore, it makes sense to identify what is important to you and to prepare yourself not to compromise those important things for immediate pleasure or gain.

      Yogi Berra captioned it this way:

      “If you do not know your destination, you might end up somewhere else.”

      5. Establish Regular “No Work” Time

      YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki established a rule not to check her emails between 6 pm and 9 pm. According to a CNN Business report, she was the first woman to request maternity leave when Google just got started. She prioritizes dinner time with her family despite being the CEO of YouTube[5].

      Is it possible to cut out time for our relationships and interests outside of work?

      Of course, and that’s why you need to set out your “no work” time. This approach will enable you to renew your energy levels for the next task. Also, you will be in the best position to introspect as you are not in your usual work zone.

      6. Know When to Stop

      You can achieve everything on your list sometimes. After you have prioritized your workload and assessed your estimates, remove the remaining tasks from your priority list and focus on your most urgent and important tasks.

      Conclusion

      It’s not enough to be successful at work. Ensure you make out time for your family and an important relationship in your life.

      Getting started and finding time may be tricky, but with some practice using the Prioritization Matrix, you’ll find that you are more productive and better able to divide your time between the things that are important to you.

      More Tips on Prioritizing

      Featured photo credit: William Iven via unsplash.com

      Reference

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