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How to Keep Burnout at Bay

How to Keep Burnout at Bay

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    I write for a number of different publications and websites, largely about the same thing – technology and the Web. Much of what I write follows a fairly similar pattern, and fits into a relatively narrow range of subjects. I love writing that kind of thing, and enjoy doing it every time I sit down to do so.

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    Or at least, I did until about three weeks ago. Then, one morning, I sat down to write, and couldn’t think of a single thing I wanted to do less in that moment than write a blog post or article. I had major writing burnout, and needed to do something to recharge my batteries and re-juice my excitement and passion for writing.

    To do that, I tried a number of things, with varying degrees of both extremity and success. Here are the ones that worked for me:

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    Change Your Scenery

    It’s amazing the difference a coffee shop makes. For me, sitting in the same place every day, writing what felt like the same thing every day, got redundant and boring. By changing the part of that equation that was in my control (the location), getting things done became a lot more appealing. I’m not sure what it is, but there’s something to be said for packing up, going to a coffee shop, and sitting down with a massive coffee to get your writing done. Rejuvenated and caffeinated, I was in a much better place (literally and figuratively) to write.

    Change Your Methods

    Up until my moment of burnout, it had been a surprisingly long time since I had done any real writing on paper. Everything was done on my computer, and that was contributing to my feelings of redundancy. So, I took the 19th century dive, and broke out a pen and paper. I wrote an entire post on a piece of paper, and then later copied it onto my computer. Then, I used the paper to draw a mind map of more post ideas. Using paper forced me to think actively, and concentrate on my writing – I can type without looking, but I sure can’t write without looking. It helped to center my focus and think a little differently, which brought me back to writing productively.

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    Debate Yourself

    The most fun thing I did during my brief stint with writing hatred was to pick a fight with myself. I picked something I believed strongly in – that the Web is a perfect place to organize your life and manage your applications – and began to argue the opposite side. I went on a tirade against everything I think is right, and it was a lot of fun! I finished, and wanted to tell myself why I was wrong. So I did, and that became one of my favorite posts I’ve ever written. Picking a fight is the easiest way to get passionate about almost anything, and is a great way to beat burnout and get your fire going again.

    Get Away

    Getting away was ultimately the best thing I did to beat burnout. I was fortunate to have my burning moment just before going on a cruise to the Bahamas. For a week, I didn’t use a computer, check my blog, or even think about any of the work I had to do. By the end, I found that I actually missed all of that stuff. Sitting down to brainstorm ideas and get writing done was incredibly easy, because I was excited about it again. It wasn’t the rule anymore, or the thing I had been doing every day for so long – it felt new again, and found its fun once more.

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    Not everyone will be able to get away for a week, but we can all find a way to get out and get away. Turn off the computer and go for a walk, or go do something bizarre and crazy you’ve always wanted to do (I highly recommend skydiving). Even the shortest break or interruption in the routine can make it feel new and different again.

    We’ve all had those moments, even when we’re doing something we love to do: we just need a break. If you can’t take a break, consider finding a different way to do whatever you have to do – even if it means finding a pen and paper. If you can take a break, short or long, do it. Breaking a routine is the key to rejuvenating your love for your routine, and helping you revive the passion for your work.

    What do you do when you’re burned out?

    Photo: jessica.hawkins11

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    Last Updated on May 24, 2019

    How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

    How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

    If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

    Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

    1. Create a Good Morning Routine

    One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

    CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

    You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

    If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

    The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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    2. Prioritize

    Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

    Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

      If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

      Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

      How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

      3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

      One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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      Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

      Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

      Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

      And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

      4. Take Breaks

      Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

      To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

      After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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      I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

      5. Manage Your Time Effectively

      A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

      How do you know when exactly you have free time?

      By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

      With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

      Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

      A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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      20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

      6. Celebrate and Reflect

      No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

      Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

      Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

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      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

      Reference

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