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How to Organize Your Clothes And Save Space

How to Organize Your Clothes And Save Space

As someone who identifies as a Tom Boy, I have an embarrassing amount of clothes. Everything from bulky coats, to vintage dresses, converse sneakers to my 75+ geeky t-shirt collection. But just because I have an online shopping addiction doesn’t mean that my closet has to become a horrifying wasteland that’s reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic film. Here’s some tips and tricks to organizing your clothes and saving space.

1. Donate Old Or Unwanted Clothes

 

    I know, I’m hitting you where it hurts.

    The first step to getting organized is to get rid of the things you don’t want or need anymore. It will make the subsequent process much faster and easier. For those of you who find it hard to let go, I recommend The Closet Trick from Discardia:

    Turn all the hangers in your closet around the wrong way (ie the hooks pointing outwards). When you wear something, put it back with the hook the “normal” way. In six months, any hanger that is still facing the wrong way is holding an item you haven’t worn. This means it’s time to donate it.

    Be strong!

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    2. Pack Away Out-Of-Season-Clothing

      Why clutter up your cupboard with clothes you won’t even need for another six months. Take advantage of your empty luggage by making them work you even when you’re not on vacation. Pack away all un-needed items in them and simply slide them away somewhere neatly. If you prefer saving even more room, invest in some vacuum bags.

      3. Combination Storage

        Utilize a combination of storage units to fit your different needs: drawers for folded items, hangers for dresses and suits, boxes for random bits and pieces. It will make things look neater, and everything will be easier to find.

        4. Umbrella Stands

          This sounds weird, I know. But these odd little items are far handier than you might think. They’re perfect for storing unique items that need to be readily on hand, but don’t pack away particularly easy, such as yoga and exercise mats.

          5. Shoe Shelves

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            Instead of dumping your shoes at the bottom of your closet, or by the front door, invest in some neat shoes shelves or cubbies to house them.

            6. Utilize All Vertical Space

              Don’t let all of that space below the hangers go to waste. Use the vertical space both above and below the rod in order to store more.

              7. Color Coding

                Sick of digging around to find that one item? Color coding is the answer. Not only does it look aesthetically pleasing, it makes finding things a lot easier.

                8. Hooks

                  Add extra storage space by using hooks on the back of your closet doors.

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                  9. Hanging Jewellery Storage

                    Too much jewellery without much space? Sick of everything getting tangled in a box? Utilize one of your spare hangers and turn it into some more vertical storage.

                     

                    10. Make Your Closet More Aesthetically Pleasing

                      Turn your creativity loose and think of ways to add pleasure to the routine of getting dressed and looking through your closet every day. If you spend more time sprucing up your closet, then you will be less likely to let it get messy in the future.

                      11. Optimal Belt Storage

                        Don’t let belts take up more room than they should. Invest in some command hooks to place against the wall or on the inside door of the cupboard. Or even better, a sectioned off drawer.

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                        12. Hat Boxes

                          This may sound old fashioned, but hat boxes really are the best way to effectively store your hat collection. Plus, they’re the best way to protect them from damage.

                          13. Proper Handbag Storage

                            Similar to shoes, handbags can sometimes end up in a pile at the bottom of your closet. Avoid this by placing them on shelves. As a bonus tip, take the time to stuff them with some paper; this stops them from topping straight over.

                            14. Sweater Care

                              Trying to hang sweaters on hangers is one of the worst closet mistakes you can make. Not only will they stick out in a bulky fashion, they can be stretched out and even fall straight to the floor easily. Fold them neatly and store them on a shelf instead.

                              15. Pants, Skirts and Shorts Storage

                                Hang these tricky items with clips, but be sure to fold in the sides so the outside of the garment isn’t marked. This system also makes everything look uniform on the hanger and gives it a cleaner side profile to your closet.

                                Featured photo credit: Organised Closet via prettymayhem.com

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                                Tegan Jones

                                Commercial editor for global publications Gizmodo, Kotaku, Lifehacker & Business Insider.

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                                Last Updated on October 23, 2018

                                Easily Distracted? Here’s Your Solution

                                Easily Distracted? Here’s Your Solution

                                Are you reading this article because you’re currently searching for a solution or method to help improve your focus? Trying to find a way to concentrate better so that you can get more done in your day? Or, do you feel like you spend a lot of time easily distracted on things other than what you’re meant to really be focusing on?

                                Don’t worry, you’re not alone! As our society becomes more and more advanced, there is much more information for us to digest and more opportunities to experience. This can definitely be overwhelming and distracting! Whether it’s a work proposal that you’re trying to focus on writing, or a goal in life that you’re striving for, distractions do get in the way of your focus towards those important things in your life. And, the distractions come in a wide variety!

                                For example, many of us are easily distracted by our mobile phones. Whether it’s the constant notifications popping up, or the need to scroll through your social media news feeds, these are all distractions that cost us time. There are also bigger distractions like wanting to go to a game on a beautiful day, or taking a weekend holiday even though you have a deadline due on Monday.

                                What are Distractions?

                                Let’s go deeper to break down and understand how distractions happen in the first place. Distractions are things that divert away your attention from the action that you’re trying to do. They make you lose focus and put you off track. The problem with distractions is that they not only cost time, they dilute your energy, too. Repeated interruptions of this sort can lead to demotivation, because you’ll feel like you’re overwhelmed… yet not getting anything done!

                                Contrary to popular belief, our brains perform best when we’re focused on one objective at a time. We’re generally not good at constantly switching our attention between different tasks. Multiple studies have shown that when we do this, the performance of each task suffers compared to if we focused on them one by one. So multitasking isn’t the best option when it comes to wanting to get more done quickly.

                                How Much Do Distractions Cost?

                                As I mentioned previously, in today’s society, we’re faced with so much information that it’s easy to be bombarded by distractions.

                                If you’re a typical working American, you’ll be distracted every 11 minutes; and, it will take you 25 minutes to settle down again to your task. Additionally, the more complicated your project, the longer it will take to regain your focus. This happens because your brain has to put in considerable effort when switching between complex objectives.

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                                Distractions have a huge cost on our focus and productivity. If you want to improve or increase your focus, you need to learn to deal with the distractions in your life.

                                What are Internal Distractions?

                                When it comes to distractions, we tend to think of them as external occurrences: your phone starts ringing, someone talks to you and interrupts your train of thought when you were immersed in something important, or the sudden onset of construction noise when you’re in an important meeting.

                                It’s very easy to blame external distractions as the cause when you can’t focus. But, there’s actually a hidden type of distraction beneath the surface that is just as, if not more, responsible for taking away your focus. These are Internal Distractions.

                                The problem with internal distractions is, if you’re not acutely aware of them, you can be wasting both time and energy without even knowing it. So, before tackling external distractions effectively, you first have to take care of your internal distractions.

                                Priority Chaos

                                There are a few types of internal distractions, but let’s start with probably the most common one: the concept of Priority Chaos.

                                One of the most common distractions we encounter is that we have too many options on hand. This can cause priority chaos.

                                For example, some people may find it hard to focus at home because there are too many options to choose from. You can choose to feed your dog, read a book, watch TV, have a snack or take a nap.

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                                Besides the costs of distraction mentioned before, priority chaos is a big demotivator. When there are too many potentially attractive options, it’s hard to focus your energy and choose one of them – ideally the one you should be doing.

                                Priority chaos is also a demotivator because it makes you feel guilty. When you let your internal distractions overtake your focus, you’re the one who chooses to divert your own attention and energy away from your task. So when the task you wanted to complete doesn’t get done, you can’t blame an external factor. Whether you do it consciously or not, you’ll end up blaming yourself!

                                Why Does Priority Chaos Happen?

                                Your brain subconsciously prioritizes tasks based on three factors.

                                1. To fulfil an existing need. For example, you need to go to the bathroom urgently, so your brain is guaranteed to prioritize it.
                                2. To achieve a certain feeling of satisfaction, such as the satisfaction of eating a delicious chocolate fudge cake.
                                3. The perceived cost of achieving the benefit. What is the effort, energy or time required to complete this action?

                                The brain automatically take these 3 factors into account even when you’re not thinking about it.  

                                Unfortunately, unless you’re consciously making an effort, your brain is not always the best at making accurate judgement calls. It tends to have a bias towards short term benefits and short term costs.

                                As there are often many more options our brains link to short term benefits, when you’re trying to focus on a task that gives you a long term benefit, that task usually becomes low priority. This is the essence of Priority Chaos.

                                How to Overcome Priority Chaos?

                                The good news is that it’s not so difficult to overcome this common internal distraction.

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                                The first step that you can take is to identify what task needs the most focus to get accomplished. Once you have that figured out, simply break down the that task into smaller, bite-sized tasks. Each bite-sized task should have a very clear short term benefit (something that you can easily describe in one sentence), and a very clear short term cost (something that you can quantify, such as time spent).

                                For example, let’s say you have a grant proposal to write for an upcoming project at work. The first bite-sized task that you can accomplish is to outline the grant proposal and split it into 4 different categories. This will ensure that you cover everything that is needed, and allows you to focus on each section one at a time.

                                Also, set a time limit or duration for each bite sized task. The time limit should be short enough so that it’s a no-brainer to want to check it off. Remember, the brain has a bias towards short term benefits, so it’s likely you’ll find it hard to resist checking off a bite-sized task!

                                The next step would be to evaluate your other options. Besides focusing on your grant proposal, what are all the possible things that you could be doing that would divert your attention away? Be realistic about what they are! Write them all down, and list out the benefits and the costs associated. You don’t have to write them down in detail, just a general description will do.

                                For instance, instead of writing your proposal, you could spend 20 minutes watching a comedy series on Netflix. The benefit is that you get entertained and have a good laugh. The cost is that you’ve just lost 20 minutes of your time, and that comedy series did nothing to help you with the grant proposal.

                                Once you have your list completed, start prioritizing them. You have a time limit, so you need to order your tasks by priority, starting with the focus task as your top priority. Then fit the others around it.

                                For any remaining tasks on the list that won’t fit within your allocated time, don’t worry. You don’t have to give them up. Just schedule them for another time.

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                                Long and Short Term Benefits

                                As explained earlier, our brains are not good at evaluating and comparing short term and long term benefits.

                                Short term benefits usually have a relatively low cost and are concrete, allowing our brains to easily grasp them. We usually associate long term benefits with high cost, and these perceived costs are usually not as clear cut. The longer term it is, the more effort it takes to imagine the benefits. This automatically creates a mental barrier and resistance in our brains. As a result, we tend to trade long term gain for short term gains.

                                This is the reason why you might know that something is good for you in the long term, such as losing weight and exercising, but for some reason, you can’t force yourself to feel excited about it. On the other hand, you might know that something is bad for you, such as binge eating junk food. But, the anticipation of short term satisfaction overwhelms your conscious ability to resist it.

                                This is the next type of internal distraction that we face, and it is called Short & Long Term Mismatch. Thankfully, this can be tackled, too.

                                If you’d like to learn more about this internal distraction and how to overcome it, subscribe to our newsletter today, where you will automatically receive more of this knowledge that will allow you to be in greater control of your situation and actions.

                                There is More Than Focus alone!

                                Whether it’s wanting to increase your focus to be more productive, or wanting to manage your time better, here at Lifehack, we’re committed to helping you find and become a better you. If you’d like to truly transform your life around, you shouldn’t be focusing only on one area of your life–such as changing a career or learning to manage your time better, and expect life-changing results. Instead, you must focus on changing yourself in several areas at once–which are what I call the 7 Cornerstone Skills.

                                These 7 Cornerstone Skills will help you to build a long term foundation. It’s not teaching a set of independent skills — it’s one system with different aspects. Here at Lifehack, we’ve created the perfect course that will enable you to learn all 7 skills, and as you go through the course, we’ll connect the dots into a single cohesive whole. You’ll progress on a journey of personal growth and transformation with each module that you complete. So if you’re feeling stuck in any area of your life today, why not start this journey with us?

                                Featured photo credit: Erik Lucatero via unsplash.com

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