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How to Organize Your Clothes And Save Space

How to Organize Your Clothes And Save Space

As someone who identifies as a Tom Boy, I have an embarrassing amount of clothes. Everything from bulky coats, to vintage dresses, converse sneakers to my 75+ geeky t-shirt collection. But just because I have an online shopping addiction doesn’t mean that my closet has to become a horrifying wasteland that’s reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic film. Here’s some tips and tricks to organizing your clothes and saving space.

1. Donate Old Or Unwanted Clothes

 

    I know, I’m hitting you where it hurts.

    The first step to getting organized is to get rid of the things you don’t want or need anymore. It will make the subsequent process much faster and easier. For those of you who find it hard to let go, I recommend The Closet Trick from Discardia:

    Turn all the hangers in your closet around the wrong way (ie the hooks pointing outwards). When you wear something, put it back with the hook the “normal” way. In six months, any hanger that is still facing the wrong way is holding an item you haven’t worn. This means it’s time to donate it.

    Be strong!

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    2. Pack Away Out-Of-Season-Clothing

      Why clutter up your cupboard with clothes you won’t even need for another six months. Take advantage of your empty luggage by making them work you even when you’re not on vacation. Pack away all un-needed items in them and simply slide them away somewhere neatly. If you prefer saving even more room, invest in some vacuum bags.

      3. Combination Storage

        Utilize a combination of storage units to fit your different needs: drawers for folded items, hangers for dresses and suits, boxes for random bits and pieces. It will make things look neater, and everything will be easier to find.

        4. Umbrella Stands

          This sounds weird, I know. But these odd little items are far handier than you might think. They’re perfect for storing unique items that need to be readily on hand, but don’t pack away particularly easy, such as yoga and exercise mats.

          5. Shoe Shelves

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            Instead of dumping your shoes at the bottom of your closet, or by the front door, invest in some neat shoes shelves or cubbies to house them.

            6. Utilize All Vertical Space

              Don’t let all of that space below the hangers go to waste. Use the vertical space both above and below the rod in order to store more.

              7. Color Coding

                Sick of digging around to find that one item? Color coding is the answer. Not only does it look aesthetically pleasing, it makes finding things a lot easier.

                8. Hooks

                  Add extra storage space by using hooks on the back of your closet doors.

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                  9. Hanging Jewellery Storage

                    Too much jewellery without much space? Sick of everything getting tangled in a box? Utilize one of your spare hangers and turn it into some more vertical storage.

                     

                    10. Make Your Closet More Aesthetically Pleasing

                      Turn your creativity loose and think of ways to add pleasure to the routine of getting dressed and looking through your closet every day. If you spend more time sprucing up your closet, then you will be less likely to let it get messy in the future.

                      11. Optimal Belt Storage

                        Don’t let belts take up more room than they should. Invest in some command hooks to place against the wall or on the inside door of the cupboard. Or even better, a sectioned off drawer.

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                        12. Hat Boxes

                          This may sound old fashioned, but hat boxes really are the best way to effectively store your hat collection. Plus, they’re the best way to protect them from damage.

                          13. Proper Handbag Storage

                            Similar to shoes, handbags can sometimes end up in a pile at the bottom of your closet. Avoid this by placing them on shelves. As a bonus tip, take the time to stuff them with some paper; this stops them from topping straight over.

                            14. Sweater Care

                              Trying to hang sweaters on hangers is one of the worst closet mistakes you can make. Not only will they stick out in a bulky fashion, they can be stretched out and even fall straight to the floor easily. Fold them neatly and store them on a shelf instead.

                              15. Pants, Skirts and Shorts Storage

                                Hang these tricky items with clips, but be sure to fold in the sides so the outside of the garment isn’t marked. This system also makes everything look uniform on the hanger and gives it a cleaner side profile to your closet.

                                Featured photo credit: Organised Closet via prettymayhem.com

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                                Tegan Jones

                                Tegan is a passionate journalist, writer and editor. She writes about lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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                                Last Updated on October 15, 2019

                                Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                                Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                                Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

                                Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

                                There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

                                Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

                                Why we procrastinate after all

                                We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

                                Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

                                Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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                                To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

                                If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

                                So, is procrastination bad?

                                Yes it is.

                                Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

                                Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

                                Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

                                It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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                                The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

                                Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

                                For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

                                A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

                                Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

                                Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

                                How bad procrastination can be

                                Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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                                After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

                                One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

                                That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

                                Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

                                In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

                                You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

                                More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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                                8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

                                Procrastination, a technical failure

                                Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

                                It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

                                It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

                                Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

                                Reference

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