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Genius – You Can Be One Too!

Genius – You Can Be One Too!
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When we think of a genius we think of someone who was a prodigy in their childhood and later went on to capitalize on their mental powers and make a success out of their lives, perhaps finding the cure for cancer or joining NASA to help launch man into outer space.
As a general rule these are people we hold up as an exception to the rule, a run against the norm. We believe that their incredible mental abilities have allowed them to stretch beyond the limits of normal of humanity; however, this is not the case.

Oddly enough, scientists believe that it is the physical formation of the brain that determines a person’s intelligence. A brain with a greater quantity of gray matter in the cerebral cortex, the portion of the brain which controls its higher functions (the lower portions of the brain control bodily activities, such as breathing and the pumping of the heart) will bless a person with a greater intelligence.

It is believed to be the reason that many children who possess above average intelligence come from parents who possess a great deal of intelligence; the physical structure of the brain is handed down genetically.

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Is it impossible for a person who does not have an excessive quantity of gray matter in their brain to be intelligent? Certainly not! The ability of the brain to function is based greatly on the ability of its neurons to connect with each other.

An increase in neuron connection equals an increase in brain activity, which equals an increase in the thought process and the ability of the brain to respond more quickly in certain situations.

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There are many situations that result in an inability of the neurons to connect with maximum efficiency. One of the most common is sleep deprivation, an epidemic that is sweeping across the globe as men, women and children of all ages attempt to accomplish more in a day than it was ever intended for them to do. Drug and alcohol use will also have a negative effect on the ability of the neurons to connect properly.

The good news is that everyone’s brains operate by these same fundamental principles, regardless of the amount of gray matter present. What does this mean? It means that by successfully increasing the ability of the neurons to connect anyone can increase their intelligence.

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How can one increase the connection of their neurons? By using them! The brain can continue to produce new neurons into old age; the degeneration of the mind that accompanies the golden years is generally caused by disease or disuse rather than a natural body process.

By continuing to exercise the brain through reading and academic puzzles anyone can increase and maintain their brain power, even if they aren’t your average genius.

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If you ever think that genius can only be born, you can be seriously wrong.
In 1952, an experiment was done by Aaron Stern on his daughter, Edith, which proves the world that given the right environment and strategies, a person’s intelligence can be developed and trained. Edith was truly a genius who obtained a PH. D. degree at the age of 18.

In short, Aaron Stern trained Edith from the time she was born. Playing classical music to her, using picture cards and flash cards to teach her everyday even she was only a few weeks old. At the age of 5, she had finished reading the entire encyclopedia Britannica.

The good is you can train yourself to be a genius too even though you started out late. It’s only a matter of the right strategies and methods. Start by listening to classical music on a daily basis or using Mindmaps to brain storm from ideas.

George Tee is the author of “Secrets Of Scoring ‘A’s” and founder of Learning Nest – Secretsofstudying.com . A few of his popular articles are 5 Hacks That Make Study Simple And Effective, 11 Things Students Do To Get Back At Teachers and Time Management for a Stress-Free Life

More by this author

George Tee

George is the founder of Secrets of Studying. He is devoted in sharing his secrets of learning and growing as an entrepreneur.

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Last Updated on October 15, 2019

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

Why we procrastinate after all

We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

So, is procrastination bad?

Yes it is.

Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

How bad procrastination can be

Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

Procrastination, a technical failure

Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

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