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FAD: File, Action, Delete. Make Your Goals Happen.

FAD: File, Action, Delete. Make Your Goals Happen.

It is almost June and the question on my mind is whether or not I can really enjoy my holidays because my goals are on track. The summer sun is calling us outside while those in the Southern Hemisphere are snuggling up for winter. I always feel a sense of urgency around this time of year; the clock is ticking and I realise that I only have half the amount of time left to complete all the goals I set at the start of the year. Items on the to-do list need to be crossed off and I need to make revisions to actions that have not been achieving the desired results.

Summer holiday unplugging brings with it a revival in my thinking. My creative inclinations start blooming again, and ideas and plans start taking shape. Reflection is important during this period: looking back, looking forward and taking decided action. Knowing how to take decided action is key.

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My creative inclinations start blooming again.

Firstly, I do a brain dump of all the goals I am working on and all the new ideas that are swirling in my mind. I also bring my master list to the exercise. I then use the File, Action, Delete method to take action:

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File:

There are a number of reasons to file items from both my master list and my new ideas list:

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  • I will only need to take action at a later date.
  • I can only take action when I have completed another task.
  • I am waiting for someone else to get back to me about something.
  • I am still planning the action or gathering information about it.
  • I need to oversee activity related to the item but I am not directly involved.
  • I will ‘file’ these items by scheduling them into my calendar so that I remember to follow up on them. When the allotted date comes up, I will then either move the item into the action category or I will delete it.

Action:

Items can be actioned when:

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  • I need to take action immediately in order to progress the activity.
  • All tasks that needed to be completed prior to this item are complete.
  • I am not waiting for anyone to provide further information or input on the item.
  • All research and planning around the item are complete.
  • There is a deadline attached to the item.
  • I action these items by immediately taking the next step that is required to progress the goal to its next phase. If there are too many items to action on the spot, I schedule them into my calendar over the next couple of weeks. If an items has been actioned immediately it also gets deleted from the lists.

Delete:

Items can be deleted when:

  • There is no longer a need to complete the item.
  • The item has passed its due date.
  • The item was an idea that never came to fruition.
  • The item requires action from someone else and is not related to you.
  • The item no longer interests you at all.
  • The item was actioned or filed.
  • The FAD method is versatile and can be applied to many areas of work and life. For example, it can be used to clear out an inbox. It can be used to clear out cupboards or storage spaces (with some modification to the language of course: store, use or throw out). It can also be applied to specific projects and their multiple action items. It can be applied to company restructuring when reviewing processes. It can be applied to a personal training regime.

There are many benefits to using the FAD method but I find the following three to be the greatest::

  • A continual sense that my goals and master list are achievable.
  • A very clear focus on what is most important, right now.
  • A sense of regularly de-cluttering which means I do not feel mentally burdened.

Have you used the FAD method before? Where can you see this method being applied in your work and life?

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Last Updated on June 1, 2021

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy (And Need to Change That)

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy (And Need to Change That)

“Busy” used to be a fair description of the typical schedule. More and more, though, “busy” simply doesn’t cut it.

“Busy” has been replaced with “too busy”, “far too busy”, or “absolutely buried.” It’s true that being productive often means being busy…but it’s only true up to a point.

As you likely know from personal experience, you can become so busy that you reach a tipping point…a point where your life tips over and falls apart because you can no longer withstand the weight of your commitments.

Once you’ve reached that point, it becomes fairly obvious that you’ve over-committed yourself.

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The trick, though, is to recognize the signs of “too busy” before you reach that tipping point. A little self-assessment and some proactive schedule-thinning can prevent you from having that meltdown.

To help you in that self-assessment, here are 7 signs that you’re way too busy:

1. You Can’t Remember the Last Time You Took a Day Off

Occasional periods of rest are not unproductive, they are essential to productivity. Extended periods of non-stop activity result in fatigue, and fatigue results in lower-quality output. As Sydney J. Harris once said,

“The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

2. Those Closest to You Have Stopped Asking for Your Time

Why? They simply know that you have no time to give them. Your loved ones will be persistent for a long time, but once you reach the point where they’ve stopped asking, you’ve reached a dangerous level of busy.

3. Activities like Eating Are Always Done in Tandem with Other Tasks

If you constantly find yourself using meal times, car rides, etc. as times to catch up on emails, phone calls, or calendar readjustments, it’s time to lighten the load.

It’s one thing to use your time efficiently. It’s a whole different ballgame, though, when you have so little time that you can’t even focus on feeding yourself.

4. You’re Consistently More Tired When You Get up in the Morning Than You Are When You Go to Bed

One of the surest signs of an overloaded schedule is morning fatigue. This is a good indication that you’ve not rested well during the night, which is a good sign that you’ve got way too much on your mind.

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If you’ve got so much to do that you can’t even shut your mind down when you’re laying in bed, you’re too busy.

5. The Most Exercise You Get Is Sprinting from One Commitment to the Next

It’s proven that exercise promotes healthy lives. If you don’t care about that, that’s one thing. If you’d like to exercise, though, but you just don’t have time for it, you’re too busy.

If the closest thing you get to exercise is running from your office to your car because you’re late for your ninth appointment of the day, it’s time to slow down.

Try these 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

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6. You Dread Getting up in the Morning

If your days are so crammed full that you literally dread even starting them, you’re too busy. A new day should hold at least a small level of refreshment and excitement. Scale back until you find that place again.

7. “Survival Mode” Is Your Only Mode

If you can’t remember what it feels like to be ahead of schedule, or at least “caught up”, you’re too busy.

So, How To Get out of Busyness?

Take a look at this video:

And these articles to help you get unstuck:

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Featured photo credit: Khara Woods via unsplash.com

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